Fade to White*

It’s a bit of a challenge to build a unique mech these days, but to build one pretty much entirely in a monochrome colour scheme and look this good is a feat. But Dead Frog inc, who has a long history of quirky and interesting Drones and Mechs, did just that:

Fadeout

I particularly like the the piece usage on the foot and the disproportionate – but very interesting arms.
(*And yes, I know it’s actually light-bluish-grey)

The Conquest of Lampsacus

The indomitable Mark Erickson has created yet another beautiful scene. I love the detailing on all of these buildings. Mark has done a great job of packing them with believable historical detail, making them all work together while still keeping each building unique. Not an easy job at all. My hat is off to you, sir!

The Conquest of Lampsacus

And the Blips have it

Some time ago, Peter Reid inflicted the cutest little robots on the universe and things have never been the same. Christened “Blips”, they have covered the galaxy in a widespread epidemic of love, hate and rampant insomnia. This picture is a collection of their vehicles and it’s a thing of beauty. I could see this as a poster on the wall in my LEGO room. Hmmmm.

Blip Vehicles

Pac-Man Ghosts: Blinky, Pinky, Inky & Clyde

Michael Kuroda has built yet another great piece that features wonderful gaming icons from our childhood. This mosaic of the classic ghosts from Pac-Man is simple, yet elegant. Michael has done a wonderful job of capturing their look and feel, while using the border to symbolize their home, the maze from which they can never escape.

Pac-Man Ghosts

Mihai Marius Mihu curses louder than you and it shows

Mihai Marius Mihu calls this piece the “Citadel of the Loud Curse”. If I lived anywhere near that thing, I’d be running for the hills! I don’t know which is more frightening…the gaping red mouth or the silent ash-colored, house-crushing Titan. Regardless, this is a very striking build and, like good art, it draws out a response from its viewers. Mihai is exceptionally skilled at that!

Citadel of the Loud Curse

The workhorses of the Commonwealth Navies

Julie Vandermeulen has recently completed a 1/38 scale model of HMCS Haida, the world’s last surviving Tribal class destroyer, which is currently a museum ship in Ontario. Its beautifully sculpted hull is an impressive 377 studs long and the model took 9 months to complete.

HMCS Haida (DDE 215)

Between 1936 and the end of WW2 a grand total of 27 Tribal class ships were built for the Royal Australian Navy, Royal Canadian Navy and (British) Royal Navy. Many of these ships fought with distinction. In British service, in particular, they were used in a number of high-risk operations and consequently sustained heavy losses, with 12 out of 16 ships sunk. Most Canadian and Australian ships survived the war and continued to serve into the fifties and sixties. The model represents Haida as she appeared in the Korean War. Her sister ship, HMCS Iroquois, was even deployed in the Cuban Missile Crisis. Tribal class destroyers may not be as well-known as the larger and more glamorous cruisers and battleships that served during WW2, but they were true workhorses. I very much appreciate seeing one of these fine ships in LEGO.