Nexo Knights 70318: The Glob Lobber | 70319: Macy’s Thunder Mace | 70320: Aaron Fox’s Aero-Striker V2 [Review]

The next wave of Nexo Knights is upon us, and we’re continuing our review series. We’ve already reviewed the four Ultimate series Nexo Knights sets. The sets are available in some markets already, and should be widely available soon.

Today we’ll be looking at 70318: The Glob Lobber, 70319: Macy’s Thunder Mace and 70320: Aaron Fox’s Aero-Striker V2.


70318: The Glob Lobber

70318 The Glob Lobber

In wave one of Nexo Knights we got two £7.99 / $9.99 / €9.99 sets that weren’t in the Ultimates line. These two were 70310: Knighton Battle Blaster and 70311: Chaos Catapult. In my opinion, these were perfect little sets: for a small amount of money you were getting two minifigures and some nice new pieces. I think these trump most of the Ultimate sets and even 853515: Knights Army-Building Set or 853516: Monsters Army-Building Set due to their inexplicably high price here in South Africa (close to $30).

Click to read the full reviews of all 3 sets

Passing on to LEGO Nirvana

There’s a saying in Japan that you’re born Shinto, get married as a Christian, and die a Buddhist. In other words, you practice Shinto rites from birth, have a Western-style wedding, and leave this world through Buddhist funeral ceremonies. Thus, one of the many unique aspects of Japanese culture I experienced growing up there was seeing station wagons with tiny, shiny golden Buddhist temples sprouting from their backs. These little mobile temples are actually Japanese hearses, and Moko has once again used his collection of chrome-gold bricks by building a LEGO version of this iconic Japanese vehicle. In case you’re too dazzled to notice, I’ll also point you to the clever front grill on this 4-wide LEGO car.

Japanese Hearse

Check out Moko’s blog for more photos, including breakdowns and building techniques.

And for all our bilingual readers out there, here’s a totally ridiculous vehicle. Unfortunately, that’s the best I can do, since the very silly pun in Japanese (「オハカー」) simply does not translate. The car has a pullback motor, though I suspect a crash could result in grave consequences.

That pun is so funny I need to go lie down now and meditate on my life. Memento mori.

This real-life LEGO Minifigure Costume will fuel your nightmares for years [Video]

Adam Savage and the crew of Tested have been dabbling in the world of LEGO lately, including visiting BrickCon and building Jason Allemann’s Sysiphus Kinetic Sculpture. Their latest LEGO hijinks, though, are sure to leave you appalled — they’ve designed a “real-life” interpretation of a LEGO Minifigure as a cosplay costume. If you’ve ever wondered what a happy yellow minifig head might look like if he was made of flesh and blood, wonder no longer. It is disturbing, and looks fresh out of Area 51.

Super Mario looks super with bricks

In 2015, the thirtieth anniversary of Mario, Nintendo released an awesome amiibo of every player one’s favorite koopa slaying plumber as a 3D version of the original character sprite. Perhaps used as a guide, John Kupitz constructed the 3D projection with LEGO bricks to equally impressive results. Sure, the voxels in the LEGO version aren’t perfect cubes, but they’re close enough that the build is instantly recognizable.

30th Anniversary Mario (18)

Building hot rods at the local parts shop

This street scene in what looks like sunny California by sanellukovic certainly doesn’t lack for local color. My eye was immediately drawn to the excellent brick-built lettering that spells “PARTS” on the garage, as well as the realistic palm trees with leaves in varying colors, but it’s the little scenes peppered throughout the larger diorama that kept me looking. The engine on a dolly inside the shop is great, but my favorite mini-scene is the old lady picking up after her chihuahua who’s just done some business on the grass.

Parts Shop

The builder has also shared this excellent 1929 Ford Model A Sedan “rat rod,” with a highly detailed engine and a body in a rusty-looking “dark nougat.”

1929 Ford Model A Sedan Rat Rod

If it bleeds, we can kill it

I watched Predator with the lights off late one night by myself when I was 14, terrified just as much that my parents would find me watching a hyper-violent R-rated movie as I was of the invisible alien antagonist. Cid Hsiao has built a Predator figure that uses the organic armor of Bionicle and Hero Factory to great effect. Placed on a stand built from regular LEGO bricks, I need this imposing fellow standing guard on my desk.

lego_predator4

The Foxbat Fighter rebuilt for combat

As new pieces and building techniques emerge and as builders improve their style, it’s interesting to see a builder revisit a previously built design. Benjamin Cheh Ming Hann shows a side-by-side comparison of his custom fighter design, the FB12 Foxbat, with his original 2013 build on the left and 2014 rebuild on the right. Improved color blocking, an overall smoother shape, and added rear fins and air intakes show Benjamin’s efforts to rework an already great compact fighter design.

FB12 FOXBAT FIGHTER Mark I & Mark II Special

See more views of Benjamin’s FB12 Foxbat on his Flickr, with an album each for Mark I and Mark II.

Keeping things running at optimal level

This rad little droid built by Marco Marozzi has all kinds of neat details packed inside its frame. I especially like face, with the thin tire squeezed in between two translucent orange armor plate pieces to break up the orange a bit. Though the droid is what grabbed my attention here, don’t miss the overall maintenance scene with engineers in oversize helmets — a bold idea to choose over standard minifigure headgear, but it works well.

Droid Maintenance

Slimes: they make a popping sound when they burst

Slimes. What are they good for? Nothing. They’re purple and oozy and maybe a little bit cute, but they get into everything and multiply like there’s no tomorrow. Sometimes, you just have to take a the drastic option, and that means grabbing the biggest hammer you can find. SPLAT! Well, that’s one fewer slime to worry about. I feel like this hilarious little vignette by Letranger Absurde was inspired entirely by the purple splat piece, aka Toy Story Stretch’s octopus arms, and I don’t think I’ve seen a better use for that piece yet.

Slime Buster

Cold winter at the Nordheim Greathouse

Isaac S. is working on a Skyrim collaboration, and based on the other bits he’s posted, it looks like it’s going to be wonderful. The Nordheim Greathouse brings it all with lovely textures to the wood and stone, along with a very very chilly atmosphere with bits of ice and lots of snow. I love the details, like the wood around the windows at the top of the tower, and those wonderful brick built, locked doors.

If you’re in the area, I encourage you to check out BrickFair VA, coming up Aug. 3 – 7, 2016.

Nordheim Greathouse

The Brothers Brick is now a tween! Happy 11th birthday to us! [News]

TBB Birthday11-year-olds are notoriously problematic — or at least I think so, having worked with unruly preteens as a lifeguard and summer swim instructor back in the day. Now that The Brothers Brick is a tween, you never know what trouble we’ll get up to. One of the things that frequently lies ahead of the tween LEGO builder is that he or she will enter what adult builders in hindsight call the “dark ages,” that time in your life when LEGO matters a whole lot less than, well, all the other things that teenagers typically do.

The thing is, The Brothers Brick has already been through a bit of a LEGO dark ages, as real life caught up with many of our long-time contributors back in 2013 and 2014. Hey, it happens — we’re all volunteers and our families and day jobs always take priority over LEGO. The good news is that we’ve made a number of significant changes to how we run things around here, and we think you’ll agree.

After we wrapped up the Battle of Bricksburg at BrickCon in October, we recruited a cadre of 10 new contributors, from all over the world. Over the years, TBB contributors have hailed from the US, Canada, UK, the Netherlands, Australia, Croatia, South Africa, Turkey, Russia, and Mexico. We feel that it’s important to reflect the diversity of the global LEGO fan community — while we write and publish in English, there are TBB readers everywhere. A few weeks ago we even interviewed a group of LEGO builders and TBB readers in Antarctica! About only bits in the following coverage map that aren’t blue are North Korea, Eritrea, and Western Sahara. Globally, that’s more than two million people who visited Brothers-Brick.com over the past 12 months.

TBB readership 2015-2016

Click through for more about you and everybody else who reads TBB

Hispabrick Magazine 25 is out now [News]

Hispabrick Magazine issue 025 is out now and is packed full of articles.  As always, this magazine is free to download and is available in both English and Spanish.

This issue includes:

  • An in-depth review and test drive of Set 42056 Porsche GT3 RS.
  • The creator of series of Star Wars Maxifigs talks about his ‘larger than life’ creations.
  • Reviews of
    • 75098: Assault on Hoth
    • Minecraft 21128: The Village
    • 71012 – LEGO® Minifigures Disney™ Series 1
    • 71011 – Collectible Minifigures Series 15
    • 21305 – The Maze
    • 76052-1: Batman™ Classic TV Series – Batcave
    • Energy LEGO® Tablet 8”
  • Exhibition of LEGO® constructions at the XIV Collectors Fair in Mungia
  • A look at fan creations, this time the theme is sailboats.
  • A review and photos of Nathan Sawaya’s touring exhibition “The Art of the Brick”.
  • The team take a look at the updated WeDo 2.0 robotics set and compares the new educational robotics sets to their predecessors.

This latest issue can be downloaded in PDF format – Hispabrick Magazine 025 PDF (English)