Dance ’til you drop

Fresh from his win in our Bricknado contest and rapidly becoming on of my favorite brick sculptors, simplybrickingit has put together this wonderfully engaging and kinetic pair of Jive dancers. Such is the interaction between these two figures that – according to the builder – they cannot stand up alone, but counterbalance one another when connected at the hand.

BrickNerd returns to our screens with Episode 301

TBB friend Tommy Williamson, aka the BrickNerd, has just posted a new episode of his YouTube show about all things LEGO. And we’re really excited to see him back after such a long break! In this episode Tommy reveals his new studio, digs into a dino-themed BrickLoot box (with a special surprise), checks out Chroble’s minifig display shelves, and reviews the LEGO Helicarrier.


Regular TBB readers may remember we did our own Helicarrier review a while back, featuring a “flight test” that was (sadly) completely fake. Well Tommy not only called us out for being such cowards, but he even decided to one-up us and do a real flight test! Watch his video to see the result.

Horrified by this slur on our good name and reputation, The Brothers Brick have responded with an official rebuttal of Tommy’s completely valid and very reasonable accusations. Because we’re jerks.

Spacefair Fleet Week & Rancorbait Galactic Celebration

It’s Seafair Fleet Week here in Seattle, and the annual “Parade of Ships” went past my downtown office window this afternoon. Inspired by all those big boats on Elliott Bay, I went looking for a nice set of cool LEGO ships, and quickly found these beauties by Rancorbait.

First up, the “Nova” Medium Assault Cruiser incorporates great brick-built striping and a sporty red fin.

"Nova" Medium Assault Cruiser

The “Eclipse” Heavy Assault Cruiser is very obviously part of the same fleet, with a consistent design aesthetic, though the Eclipse is a bit larger and has significantly more greebles. The bridge overhanging the white section is an excellent touch.

"Eclipse" Heavy Assault Cruiser

Finally, though it’s a different scale and certainly isn’t part of the same fleet, I can’t help but love this big red “Warthog” gunship. There are just so many non-right angles all over this thing!

Warthog

Under the watchful eye of the Moai

Contrary to what many casual observers may think, building small is the true challenge for a skilled LEGO builder. Letranger Absurde (aka vitroleum) shows he’s up to that challenge, though, with this wonderfully tiny Rapa Nui replete with Moai overseeing the arrival of a European sailing vessel.

Easter Island

The Moai themselves are the “Nice Parts Usage” standout in this little creation, using the new blaster guns as the famous stone statues.

SpaceX Falcon 9 Landing in LEGO

Space is dangerous. Getting there maybe even more so, what with riding a controlled explosion to overcome gravity and all. In the United States, the majority of the space flight innovations came from NASA with a significant amount of help early on from the Air Force and German aerospace engineer Wernher von Braun.

Max Schellenberg gives us an intro to modern space travel with this brilliant microscale version of a Falcon 9 landing in the Atlantic Ocean. This is adorable and I love it.

Lego Spacex Falcon 9 Landing

Now, there are a number of private companies developing new technology: Boeing and Lockheed Martin regularly launch the Delta IV rockets under United Launch Alliance; Boeing is developing their CST-100 crew capsule. Sierra Nevada has their Dreamchaser. Jeff Bezos has Blue Origin, for tourist space flight, launching out of Texas.

And Elon Musk has SpaceX.

Off all of these, I get the most giddy about SpaceX. Because the first foray into reusable equipment with the Shuttle program still required going and fishing the boosters out of the Atlantic, along with the orbiter returning safely to earth. SpaceX has developed their Falcon 9, capable of launching a payload into space, and having the booster return to a fixed point. Namely, their “autonomous spaceport drone ships,” the Just Read the Instructions and Of Course I Still Love You. They’ve recently leased one of the former launch complexes on Cape Canaveral Air Force Base and converted into a landing facility as well.

That is amazing.

Interstellar Sales Professional

Evidently, selling earth-like vacuum cleaners is a dangerous, adventurous business. Sebastiaan (Alien Cat) returns to us from real-life adventures to present the little Alien Cat’s terribly hazardous profession selling vacuum cleaners across the known universe.

Business is clearly doing well, if this sporty read number is any indication:

Get off my lawn! 2Clearly his driving skills haven’t improved. That, or he failed to account for changes in gravity and atmosphere from one planet to another. Crash Course 7

I’m particularly fond of this lovely little star ship called Tia Maria.

Tia Maria 2

“Strength for Freedom” – the battleship USS Missouri

Dan Siskind has been designing a microscale USS Missouri, and he and his Brickmania crew have recently completed a full minifig-scale version that they’re hauling around the country to various events. I’m really looking forward to the micro-scale kit myself, but Eínon couldn’t wait, and built himself his own WW2-era “Mighty Mo.” It’s unusual to see ship models without a big block of bold red under the ship’s waterline. But the subtler dark blue with a range of gray hues suits the venerable and historic battleship — now a museum ship on display in Pearl Harbor, Hawai’i — rather nicely.

Battleship USS Missouri BB-63 - LEGO Model

Into the deeps of Gdańsk Bay

In 1968, Polish inventor Antoni Dębski and his colleagues built an underwater habitat and sunk it to 26 meters (85 feet) deep in the Baltic Sea, where they then spent 7 days testing the habitat. Polish builder Karwik has recreated the historic Meduza II from LEGO and presented it in this evocative scene, complete with atmospheric lighting and a shipwreck to explore.

Meduza II (1968)

If you’re in Warsaw, you can now see the restored habitat at the Polish Army Museum.

“Hammerhead” Exploration and Surveillance Suit

There’s a lot to love about this hardsuit by Christopher Hoffmann, from the spot of yellow on the long arm (a camera?) to the random “50” road sign and excellent color blocking between the white torso and dark gray arms and legs. Christopher says that the AC Research, Inc. suit is “For all of your topographical and biological surveillance needs, from Titan to Ganymede.” Sounds about right.

AC Research, Inc. Exploration and Surveillance Suit "Hammerhead"

One of the things I enjoyed most about the models I built for Ma.Ktober a couple years ago was building the discrete bases to showcase each model. Christopher gives the base itself substantial attention and detail, with organic landscaping to contrast with the hard mechanical detail of the suit.

Aloft in the clouds with César Soares

César Soares is one of those builders whose every creation we could feature here on The Brothers Brick as “blogworthy.” His colorful, intricate models use interesting techniques and he varies themes across Castle, Town/City, and pop culture, with a range of subjects from large-scale dioramas to smaller vehicles and vignettes. His latest model is a gorgeous floating rock with beautiful landscaping, the requisite balloon for transportation, and an eccentric building with César’s distinctive curved roof design.

The Floating Island of Todaidh Beag

Incidentally, one of the large-scale collaborative displays planned for BrickCon 2015 is floating rocks. Any chance you can come to Seattle this October, César?