Tag Archives: Train

LEGO trains have been for sale since the 1960s, and LEGO fans have been creating their own custom layouts with LEGO bricks ever since. Whether you enjoy 4.5-volt, 12-volt, 9-volt, RC, or Power Functions LEGO trains, and whether or not you have an opinion about 8-wide, 9-wide, or some other scale, you’ll find lots of gorgeous engines and rail cars right here on The Brothers Brick.

A bridge beneath the tracks

There is so much about this little scene that stands out as awesome. Regularly featured here on TBB, excellent master builder Tim Schwalfenberg does it again with his River Crossing. He says, “You can’t really have a train without some sort of track to display it on,” so he built one. The textures and colours of the rocks and foliage are impeccable. The intricate detail that has gone into the iron framework of the span across the turbulent rapids is amazing, and the brilliant red engine leaps out from the subtle textures of the natural colours and contours on the cliff face.

River Crossing

A streetcar named Peter Witt

Some people call them streetcars. Some people call them trams, and other people call them trolleys. Whatever you know them as, Nouvilas’ version of a Peter Witt is so nice it’s “off the tracks.” A Peter Witt is a type of tram car, named after the man who designed the first one back in 1914. Nouvilas built his streetcar for a collaborative diorama representing Harlem, New York, in the 1930s. I really like the way the cheese slopes flare out to create the curve of the “bumper,” and the chocolate brown and tan color scheme feels authentic for the period….almost makes me hungry for a Nestle bar!

Peter Witt Streetcar

Click to see the full Harlem layout

An abandoned hangar leads to a remake of a classic LEGO train set

Alexis Dos Santos has been chugging along with some new train models, and this rustic scene consists of two separate structures. Alexis’ “Abandoned Hangar” on the left serves as a tribute to the history of trains, while the building on the right celebrates the history of LEGO trains. I really enjoy the way these two buildings play off of one another, with the darkness of the hangar giving way to the bright and colorful rail yard.

Abandoned Hangar

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Hands-on with the new LEGO City Trains in New York [News]

At the LEGO Fall Preview 2018 event we got a chance to take a look at the new LEGO City trains that were revealed yesterday. The designers have chosen to stick with a familiar theme that includes another modern passenger train as well as an industrial type train. We’ve also got a first look at a few new track packs that will be coming earlier in the summer. Let’s take a look at what’s in store.

See our complete coverage of the upcoming LEGO Trains

First pictures of the new LEGO City trains with new Power Functions elements [News]

LEGO City is growing especially rapidly this year, and while citizens enjoy hiking and rafting or busy making a doctor’s appointment, the new trains are arriving – 60197 Passenger Train and 60198 Freight Train. Both look very fresh and include some brand new Power functions elements, which we can’t wait to play with!

60197 Passenger Train | €129.99

Click here to see both trains!

When you need a lot of power, a locomotive is like no other

This classic diesel-electric locomotive dates to the 1940s, and generates a whopping 1,600 horsepower. The ALCO RS-2 seen here, #2099, was operated by the Sante Fe railway, and this model by Beat Felber is the spitting image on the real deal, right down the bold stripes, thanks to some careful decal application. It’s powered with Power Functions motors, and also has working headlights.

Santa Fe ALCO RS-2 1600 hp Demonstrator #2099

The engine is a switcher, meant for shuffling cars around rather than taking cargo on long hauls across the country, and the builder has paired it with some lovely cars to show it off.

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A near-perfect double

Some might say that there are two kinds of LEGO creations: those that are pure imagination, and those that are modeled after something specific. You could argue that the former is harder because you have to come up with a design out of thin air. The latter at least has a sense of direction! On the other hand, if you’ve ever tried to recreate a non-LEGO subject in detailed LEGO form, you would know that it’s really difficult to get it to look just right. But one builder, wes_turngrate, has managed to pull this off in exceptional fashion! His LEGO version of a Great Western Railway 8750 Pannier Tank Engine is just about as close to the original as you can get!

18. GWR 8750 with 'O' gauge 5700 for comparison [P1040378]

Obviously a lot of love and attention to detail went into this train. You may notice there are a couple slight differences between the two pictured, but they’re actually that way for a reason. The O-gauge model train in the background is his late father’s original GWR 5700 Class engine. Apparently this LEGO version is modeled after a minor variant (8750). Even so, these are incredibly close and we’re very impressed either way! Wes, I’m sure this is one build your father would be proud of!

16. GWR 8750 with printed parts [P1040391]

Incredible self-driving LEGO train system shuffles balls around endlessly [Video]

This railway contraption by Akiyuki seems to have a single objective: mesmerizing viewers with an incredible orchestration of moving trains while appearing to be doing something relatively productive.

Overview of GBC Train System

Its only function is a closed looped system that transports LEGO balls. This type of machine is commonly known by LEGO fans as a Great Ball Contraption. Here, the machine consists of a circuit of tracks and seems to perform a crucial task, and that appearance is itself quite a major feat of design and ingenuity. For me, I’d prefer to call it out as an Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) machine—which is a fancy way of saying it gives me the shivers—and it makes me want to stare at it continuously.

Train Showcase

Consisting of several modules and utilising four carriages to transport the balls from section to section, let’s take a look at the various modules that make this thingamajig tick.

Click to see the modules in detail

Going loco all the way to Micropolis

Sometimes it’s a single LEGO piece which sparks the inspiration for an entire model. That’s what seems to have happened here, with David Zambito deciding the Nexo Knights helmet visor might make a good cowcatcher for a locomotive. He wasn’t wrong – it looks excellent – as does the rest of this microscale creation. The details on the train are good, although I wish the loco itself was a different colour to offer better contrast with the grey rockwork around the tunnel. The mix of skeleton arms used for steam is an obvious highlight, but don’t miss that little tent and campfire – a lovely touch which breaks up the surrounding landscaping.

Country Side Tunnel

An actual LEGO locomotive that distributed LEGO bricks

A Köf or Klienlokomotive literally means a “small locomotive”and, in the 1980s,  LEGO utilised a yellow Köf at their German LEGO distribution center in Hohenweststedt.  As a huge fan of the classics, builder Faust Chang has built a scaled replica model of the Hohenweststedt train,  with details right down into the dashboard and engines. I’m sure for train fans and aficionados alike, it’s pretty cool to know that there’s a tiny train out there that once was run and operated by LEGO.  Sadly in 2002 the Köf was sold by LEGO and  was painted red by its new owners.

Click to see more details

Everything is on track for Christmas

This is surely the most festive LEGO model we’ve seen all year — a brilliant gingerbread train, decked in Christmas icing and decorations. Put together by Koen for a competition on the LEGO Rebrick site, this was a worthy winner. The locomotive is an obvious highlight with it’s gleaming iced sections and little pops of candy colour, but my favourite part is the tiny house on the rear carriage — a beautiful confection with cupcakes on the roofline and liquorice detailing. Yum yum.

Gingerbread Train

Riding the rails with a LEGO WWII Army supply train

An army marches on its stomach, and it’s hard to feed a soldier without an appropriate supply route. Cutting off an enemy’s supply routes is a quick path to victory, so it’s imperative to adequately guard your own routes. Enter the armored train, ready to defend itself. Builder tablizm brings us an amazing demo model of a US Army military train, showing off a variety of cars from different eras.

Let’s take a closer look at the individual cars below.

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