Tag Archives: Train

LEGO trains have been for sale since the 1960s, and LEGO fans have been creating their own custom layouts with LEGO bricks ever since. Whether you enjoy 4.5-volt, 12-volt, 9-volt, RC, or Power Functions LEGO trains, and whether or not you have an opinion about 8-wide, 9-wide, or some other scale, you’ll find lots of gorgeous engines and rail cars right here on The Brothers Brick.

Riding the rails with a LEGO WWII Army supply train

An army marches on its stomach, and it’s hard to feed a soldier without an appropriate supply route. Cutting off an enemy’s supply routes is a quick path to victory, so it’s imperative to adequately guard your own routes. Enter the armored train, ready to defend itself. Builder tablizm brings us an amazing demo model of a US Army military train, showing off a variety of cars from different eras.

Let’s take a closer look at the individual cars below.

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Amazing detailed recreation of a city train station in Germany

The City Station of Trossingen in Germany built by Steffen Rau is simply breathtaking. The architectural detailing and color are astounding and eye-popping, with intricate features on the facade that look like it took some marvelously complex techniques to achieve that even an architect would be proud of. The siding just below the roof which was most likely wooden gives a beautiful compliment in color to the red roof tiling and a nice contrast with the mid-section in black and white.

Trossingen Station 6

The back of the building features the train tracks and a platform with minifigure commuters waiting for their train to arrive.

See more of this massive LEGO train station

New South Wales AD60 class LEGO locomotive

When tasked with building an insanely long LEGO train component (60+ studs in length or 70+ if permanently coupled), Alexander steamed full speed ahead and he didn’t stop until his LEGO locomotive reached an impressive 98 studs in length! Based on the NSW 60 class (which operated in Australia starting in the early 1950’s), Alexander’s choo choo has two XL motors, working headlights and marker lights, and some rather sleek custom vinyl decals. Not to mention, it’s pretty much a spot-on rendition of the real thing.

OcTRAINber: NSW AD60 Class Garratt

To check out more photos, head on over to Alexander’s Flickr. And for even more super-long LEGO trains, check out OcTRAINber.

Crossing the bridge

The arrival of the Blue Comet

Fancy a train trip to New Jersey? Make sure you have your ticket booked as the iconic Blue Comet by Cale Leiphart is arriving! Its thoroughly designed body measures more than 40 studs in length and features a ton of the tiniest elements: valves, sand and steam domes, levers and regulators — all in blue, which makes this build a remarkable assembly of LEGO parts in regular blue color.

Comet Locomotive 01

And it wouldn’t be a proper locomotive without a full set of carriages. As usual, Flick album has all the details of this impressive train.

Comet Train Set 02

All aboard the Disney Train!

I’m pretty sure a motorhead like Donald Duck would love to get his wings on this beautiful toy steam locomotive. David Liu has turned Mickey Mouse into a coal car, while Goofy makes an adorable passenger car. Built for his son, the model has built-in radio control, however, his son prefers playing with it with his hands.

Disney Train

The color schemes look perfect and instantly recognizable – even from a thumbnail. Donald’s sailor’s hat on the engine smoke stack is a fantastic touch! And you really need to join Mickey and Minnie for a refreshing beverage in the passenger car.

Goofy's Passenger Car

Station yourself here to get back on track

One of the buildings that most large cities have is a railway station, and LEGO cities are no different in this respect. morimorilego has built this rather traditional looking railway station with its bell tower and pleasing arched design, using a complimentary combination of greys, reddish brown, and tan. Every station needs a clock at the entrance to help passengers decide if they are late and require a last minute dash to the platform.

Module Station

There are plenty of nice architectural details and interest with the main façade.  The Mansard-esque roof and floral displays bring a touch of class to this building but those light stone steps will definitely be high maintenance on rainy days when muddy footprints strike.

Module Station

At the end of the iron road

Some classic LEGO themes are wildly popular, but somehow feel underrepresented by custom LEGO models, such as LEGO Pirates and Wild West. At least for the latter we have a new build to enjoy in this frontier train station by Marcel V. With its unique roof and prominent clock, the build looks almost steampunk, but there are no fictional elements to be found.

1872 - Train Station

There are a lot of interesting bits to see here. The semi-circular section’s construction is quite impressive, as is the roof itself. The railroad tracks look very good, done with a technique I am seeing more and more in fan creations. And as a cherry on top, Marcel has sprinkled the creation with all sorts of clutter, from sacks and guns to the local wildlife — all of which breathes life into the scene.

All aboard the Kintetsu Railway at Hyōtan-yama Station in Osaka

There’s a strong possibility that I’ll be traveling to Japan for work later this year, and I’ve spent the last couple of evenings revisiting childhood haunts via Google Maps and looking at rail connections to get from one end of the country to the other. This train station by Japanese builder Kaz Fuji was thus quite timely as I plan potential rail travel to places like Kyoto and Nara.

瓢箪山駅_014

See more of these Japanese trains and the train station

Because even after we’ve traveled to distant planets, trains will still be cool

I adore futuristic LEGO trains, but sadly it’s a very small niche that we rarely see. Fortunately builder Frost has broken tradition and created a wonderfully futuristic planetary express, complete with trans-green accents and lots of mechanical detailing. The model looks like it would be right at home jetting across the surface of a distant planet.

ST100 Planetary Express

The builder has even incorporated power functions to propel the train and power 16 working LEDs.

ST100 Planetary Express

Life is a train journey. Get on board and enjoy the ride.

This 2-4-10 configured steam locomotive is known as the Texas configuration because of the arrangement of its wheels, and such locomotives were first used in the US back in 1919. What’s unique about Gerald Cacas‘s minifigure-scale train is that the wheels and tracks were not made using the typical LEGO train elements, but emulated using other, more-everyday parts.

Texas 2-10-4 configuration locomotive

There’s also a bit of detailing going on in the cab section of the train to give it that complete look:

Texas 2-10-4 configuration locomotive.

Please excuse the mess – kids are making memories

Did you ever design your own “dream room” when your were a child? I did, and it looked something like this boy’s room by John Snyder. Built for the final round of the ABS builder challenge and largely inspired by César Soares‘ amazing kid’s room, John says of his latest creation “it was really enjoyable to build a modern interior for a change, something outside of minifigure scale”. The scene is stocked to the gills with toys including (but not limited to) LEGO, action figures, costumes, planes, trains and even a castle! The stand out features for me are the working bi-fold door, fish tank, and brilliant red telescope.

Boy's Room

Stepping up from Kragle to drilling, cutting, and sanding – a chat with Randy Sluder [Interview]

Purists look away now, as we go inside the mind of self-proclaimed LEGO outlaw Randy Sluder and see some of the innovative building he is doing around the LEGO monorail system. Randy calls himself an outlaw because he’s not afraid to cut, drill, sand, and glue to create shapes LEGO never made. However, even he has lines he won’t cross — he only uses genuine LEGO bricks and the same glue LEGO themselves use on their large display models!

Union Pacific M-10000: Image 2

TBB: So Randy, tell us a little about yourself…

Randy: I’m a graphic artist by trade and have always liked the Art Deco style, so I gravitated to the Streamliner period of trains between 1935-1955. It was a time when “form follows function” wasn’t in vogue, the emphasis was on great design. And many people don’t know that Art Deco train design was as important to the movement as the architecture.

TBB: Where does your interest in monorail trains come from?

Randy: All my life I’ve been able to hear the sound of a train, at night, no matter where I’ve lived, and because I’m a wannabe “rail fan”, and a LEGO geek! What started as a fun project for the grandkids has blossomed into a cottage industry. In building a track for them I thought it would be nice to have a few more monorails. In researching LEGO monorail designs I found most were childish, block-type designs with the better ones made from current LEGO train bodies. Nobody was designing alternate vehicles for the LEGO monorail system. So after a lot of interesting research, I started creating trains for the monorail track.

Pennsylvania Railroad GE GG1 Locomotive

Click to read the rest of the interview