Tag Archives: Space

From giant space carriers to starfighters, moon bases to moon buggies, whether you love LEGO models inspired by real-world space programs or science-fiction, you’re in the right place.

Groundbreaking hovertank seems to defy gravity

Your eyes aren’t deceiving you, this hovertank is indeed hovering! Space enthusiast Ben Smith has created a floating hovertank inspired by the fan-favourite Galaxy Patrol from the LEGO Collectible Minifigure Series 7, that not only looks awesome with a rugged colour scheme, but breaks the laws of physics. The boarding ramp is the only point of contact with the sand blue terrain, which raises the question: How is a ramp on the front of the vehicle able to actually hold it up and not collapse?

Infantry Fighting Hover Vehicle

Find out more about how it floats!

Black and Yellow

Black and Yellow, you know what it is – the 1980s LEGO Space theme “Blacktron” featuring a color scheme with heavy usage of black and yellow. In Nagisa’s build aficionados can get the best of two worlds – Star Wars and Blacktron as this design is a mashup of the two themes. Fusions of LEGO space themes with pop cultural icons are pretty common among fan-builders, but they are always refreshing to see nonetheless. Here we have the landspeeder from Solo: A Star Wars Story film which was already translated well into LEGO in set 75209, revamped in the style of Blacktron. Nagisa uses vintage control panel printed tiles and a newer curved yellow trans-clear 3x6x1 windshield to accomplish the signature aesthetic of the Blacktron faction. Of course, two fully decked out Blacktron minifigures accompany the speeder as pilots.

Nagisa offers a few configurations of the speeder which utilize different elements as thrusters – each offering a slightly varied look all of which are pretty sleek. Overall Nagisa does a great job of displaying creativity and ingenuity while still retaining the original concept of the vehicle from the Star Wars film.

Kennedy Space Center awesomeness in 10...9...8...

Here at The Brothers Brick we often feature LEGO spaceships, shuttles, and rovers both real and fictional and we are usually quite impressed. But as you can imagine we achieved a new level of…impress-ness when we saw the entire Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39A. This stellar creation was built by Lia Chan. Lia is a person of few words, no words, in fact. Other than providing a title we have no idea how many pieces this has or how long it took to build. One thing is clear is that this was a labor of love and the end result is just breathtaking.

Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39A

Lia could have stopped there and we would have been plenty impressed enough, by golly! But an alternate configuration features the shuttle launching with a realistic plume of exhaust. That is just…stellar!

Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39A

It sounded like a good idea

Seismic communication? In my Federation? It’s more likely than you think. The Brick Artisan has created a LEGO Heavy Communications Rover that overcomes planetary dust and electrical storms with the power of vibration. It’d take a scientist to explain that, probably. Meanwhile, we can marvel at that intricate radar dish construction. There’s everything in there from minifigure jackhammers to battle droid torsos. The overall shaping of the rover reminds me of the old Rock Raiders theme, or the even earlier 6950 Mobile Rocket Transport, which isn’t too shocking considering the wheels and fenders were likely sourced from the Rock Raiders line and the canopy pieces from Classic Space — those three interlocking yellow windscreens take this build to another place entirely.

Heavy Communications Rover

Speaking of Rock Raiders, how many of you first thought you were looking at a cave interior as the background here? I sure did. But that’s actually a still from Fury Road showing a massive dust storm. It still works for this creation’s backstory, but it sure felt weird to realize that. Anyway, if you want to see even more details of this clever build, check out this unedited shot.

Don’t LOL at this VTOL

M:Tron was a classic space line of LEGO sets back in the day, best recognized by the red color scheme on its vehicles. Though the line ended decades ago, builder Blake Foster resurrects this spacecraft in true M:Tron fashion.

This Heavy VTOL, which stands for Vertical Take Off and Landing, is a masterpiece in imagination. Blake Foster ingeniously combined bricks that you usually don’t see together, using large rounded red bricks with harsh green fluorescent wings jutting out. His explanation for this creative decision was that the M:Tron Corporation secretly implemented stolen alien technology into their vehicle.

I can’t get enough of the tiny details, like the power plant work around the gun or the vents on engines. See the magnetic drop pods on the bottom of the VTOL? What a great idea! The vehicle can easily transfer cargo at a moment’s notice. Perhaps it would make a great addition to his M:Tron magnet factory.

The wonders of space captivates both young and old

Show of hands, who loved all things having to do with outer space as a kid? Also show of hands, who never lost that dream even as an adult? Right? Space captures the imagination and keeps a child-like fascination within us like nothing else can…except maybe dinosaurs. Instagram user architeclego captures this feeling of wonder quite nicely with this LEGO diorama called To the moon. Whether it be the Classic Space t-shirt, the rocket diagram, or even the bunny companion, I can get lost in these details forever. The moon shining through the attic window is a sight to behold. What can I say? I’m a kid all over again!

A ship designed to bug you

Giant spaceships are cool, but I think we’ve seen the strength of the small one-man fighter to slip in and do some real damage. Blake Foster created the Grumpy Gnat Attack Fighter in under 24 hours…a level of speed this thrust-heavy vehicle understands. Built in Classic Space colors, the transparent-yellow windscreen hails from 2011’s 7985 City of Atlantis, and the blue cowling is sourced from a variety of Bionicle parts. I particularly like the Rahkshi Back Cover along the top and sides. The gap designed for the Rahkshi spines makes a perfect place to have the ship’s fins extend through. And the little touches like the red and green navigational lights just make me smile.

Grumpy Gnat Attack Fighter

This isn’t Blake’s first foray into new Classic Space vehicles. Not by a long shot! Check our archives for more space-y goodness.

Double the tensegrity, triple the trouble

Over the past few months, LEGO tensegrity sculptures have been all the rage, with their gravity-defying stacking attracting builders of all stripes to try their hands. While most tensegrity structures consist of a single floating element, a few builders have managed to add another floating section to that, which makes the delicate balancing exponentially more difficult. David Roberts makes it look easy, though, with this tower of rings.

The Three RingsTensegrity sculptures stay aloft thanks to being held in tension with three tethers (chains in this case), but David’s model also adds tension to the rings themselves, which simply comprise Technic tread links joined inside out to make a tensioned circle. It all comes together to create a beautifully simple sculpture.

Now, who wants to try their hand at creating a tensegrity sculpture with three floating levels on top of the base? Any takers?

Want to see more tensegrity sculptures? Check out our LEGO Tensegrity archives for examples from tanks to dragons.

Tread VERY carefully

Okay, so lately Cecilie Fritzvold has been building cool LEGO stuff using the dynamite bundle element as a key part. We’ve already seen arcade games and undersea adventures, and today we head into the cold wastelands of an ice planet. The explosives take on a few new uses in the Spark BLOR-20, serving as part of the flexible drilling arm and as the center of a sensor array. Oh, and a whole bunch of them combine to form heavy-duty tank treads. It’s an innovative use, but it gets extra points from me because of the tracks left in the snow behind the vehicle. Rows of modified plates create the look; clever part usage indeed.

Spark BLOR-20

Juggling klowns from outer space!

In space, no one can hear you laugh! Or scream in terror depending on your relationship to clowns. Builder Blake Foster brings some humor to the outer reaches of the universe with this wonderful LEGO juggling clown mech. I’ve just recently begun a fascination with mechs so I’m always excited to see them come up these days. Most mechs are so very intense so it’s always refreshing when they don’t take themselves too seriously. This one balances that seriousness and humor perfectly with its nicely detailed grey skeleton and additional primary color accouterments. I love the rounded fingertips that mimic oversized clown gloves and the little bow tie is a hilarious addition. The 50’s style bubble helmet is the perfect topper, filled to the brim with the curly green clown wig.

Spaceclowns: Jugglebot

But that’s not all! This is just a smaller part of a much larger model.

Read on to see the rest!

The little space rover that could

If you are planning to explore distant planets in search of scientific discoveries, You could find no more stylish way to do it than aboard this little rover by Mountain Hobbit. Not only does it have the latest in long-range communication tech, but you can even grow all your own food in the hydroponics bay, and scan the horizon with a state of the art sensor package. One of my favorite details is the wheels, which show the side usually faced toward the vehicle, with dark green tiles shoved into the spaces in the rubber.

Space Rover

It’s nice to be outside

We’ll all anxious to get out and about again, and LEGO builder Andrew (CRCT Productions) has found a safe way to do that. Well, depending on your definition of “safe.” I suppose there’s a certain amount of risk in getting up to the International Space Station. And more risk deciding to go on a spacewalk from there. But you have to admit the risk of catching COVID-19 at that point is pretty low.

The Space Walk

Designed in a scant eight hours, this creation shines with quality greebling. An abundance of grey ski poles, binoculars, and 1×1 round flower plates add texture, complemented by a heavy use of 1×2 cheese tile and curved slope. And it may be an obvious thing, but I also like how the astronauts are posed to be floating rather than attached to the surfaces by their feet. It adds some nice context to the build.

The Space Walk

Okay. So this is obviously a depiction of a spacewalk. But did anyone else also think that this was a photo-realistic LEGO camera? Just for a second? I can’t be the only one…