About Chris

Chris Malloy (porschecm2) has been a LEGO fan nearly all his life, having started with System bricks at age 3. He's been active in the online community since 2002, variously enjoying the lively families at FBTB, Classic-Space, Classic-Castle, Builder's Lounge, and Forbidden-Cove. In 2011, he finally made it to his first convention, Brickcon. He enjoys building in a wide range of themes, but keeps returning to Castle, Space, and Pirates. He has been a member of the LEGO Ambassador program since 2010. His flickr account can be found here.

Posts by Chris

This LEGO Lancia rally racer almost looks real

When it comes to crafting scale LEGO car models, there are few better than builder Bricksonwheels. This amazing 1:11-scale Lancia Delta depicts the winning car from the Tour de Corse in 1992, and it’s marvelously detailed. The eye-catching decals were designed in collaboration with fellow builder JaapTechnic, and the slew of sponsor emblems and stripes bring the car to life.

Lancia Delta HF Integrale EVO - 1992 Tour de Corse

The full name for this magnificent little hot hatch is a Lancia Delta HF Integrale EVO, and the LEGO version uses about 1,700 pieces. It’s got a full interior, including an accurate roll-cage, and all four doors open, along with the rear gate and hood. The builder created this slick overlay to show off all the goodness inside.

Lancia Delta HF Integrale EVO - 1992 Tour de Corse

 

Racing like a bluebird across the sky

This dart of a LEGO car by GunnBuilding is a reimagining from the original heyday of the automobile, when people first realized that racing steel machines with wheels was great fun. The tiny single-seater is strapped together with a tenuousness befitting its early origins, the curved slopes of the hood held closed by rubber bands and numerous other elements held on by only the merest clutch. The result, however, is brilliant, and this car looks as speedy as it does classy.

Bluebird (Updated)

Can you stomach this?

Of all the things we’ve seen built from LEGO over the years, individual organs have to come near the end of the list. Proving that they are, in fact, on the list though, is this cheery two-dimensional stomach by ForlornEmpire. There’s actually a lot of complex building involved in creating this digestive system, with skillful SNOT-work required to position the various curved slopes making the wavy edges.

I am your Stomach!

The sands of Jakku

The great desert of Jakku conceals the remnants of the Empire’s defeat, the great hulk that used to be the Imperial Star Destroyer Inflictor. We’ve seen this setting in LEGO before, but this new take by kofi looks magnificent. The smooth sand dunes created with tan tiles and curved slopes give the Inflictor heft, making you feel as though it really buried itself into the ground as it crashed.

SW_Starship Graveyard on Jakku

Be sure to check out these other interpretations of the crashed Star Destroyer on Jakku, including the amazing model that won our LEGO Creation of the Year award for 2018.

Doing a lot with a little: big LEGO creatures done small

You don’t need a huge pile of pieces or a deep wallet to be able to create something beautiful with LEGO. This bottlenose dolphin by Ken Ito (暁工房) is a perfect example of how just a few pieces can bring a scene to life. The dolphin consists of fewer than 20 pieces, and the base employs only simple, common elements. But there’s more motion evoked with them than you’ll find in many models that are much larger.

Ken’s gorilla is another perfect specimen, utilizing simple pieces to craft the animal’s shape. The head and face are particularly impressive, which really consist of only three slopes, but there’s no mistaking this noble creature’s gaze.

Fair far worlds

This charming scene of interplanetary science is brought to us by Sad Brick. It’s a simple LEGO scene of an astronaut placing a sensor on a newly discovered world, but it’s charming as can be. The greebly goodness of the sensor encased in a clear canister, with a wire strung to an outboard relay is perfect brick-built technobabble, while the arrays of flora in three colors makes the scene come to life. The use of the Collectible Minifigure Plant Monster helmet for large leaves is something I actually haven’t seen often.

Meteorological Sensor

A bit of the southwest with a charming LEGO adobe home

TBB alumn Nannan Zhang wanted to do something different from not only his usual fantasy stylings, but also unique from most LEGO architectural models. That led him to try his hand at this modern adobe home, inspired by a mix of streamline art deco and the southwestern United States. The home’s smoothly plastered walls and curved lines may look simple, but don’t be fooled because this takes some real skill.

Coming Home to Santa Fe

The back looks just as good as Nannan utilizes a wide variety of curved elements to mold the tan trim lines around the windows and make the iconic rounded wall corners. There’s plenty of great details to take in, too. My personal favorite is the chile ristras which hang next to the doors. They’re instantly recognizable, and something I’ve never seen done with LEGO before. The potted cacti made with green gears are just perfect, too.

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For a weary traveler, any port is a good port

Mos Eisley and Mos Espa may have the big name recognition in the Star Wars universe as the leaders of backwater ports, and recently Niima Outpost has been an up-and-comer. But there are myriad other tiny trading posts and starports throughout the universe, and LEGO builder Sam Malmberg takes us to one such unnamed frontier town with this dusty scene. The Imperials have a strong presence here, but there’s plenty of hustle and bustle with traders and merchants plying their wares.

Dusty Spaceport

Sam’s approach to the dry ground looks especially great, with scattered studs giving the impression of hard-packed but slightly disturbed dirt. The building facades around the back edges also give these scene a lot of depth, making it feel even larger than it is.

It’s time to play the music with this amazing animatronic LEGO Muppet Show [Video]

One glance at this amazing LEGO Muppet creation by Andreas Keinbart and I can already hear Beaker frantically meep-meep-meeping. Based on the recurring Veterinarian’s Hospital setting from The Muppet Show, the huge multi-level motorized diorama features many of the beloved Muppet characters in brick form. Up top in the lab are Dr. Bunsen and Beaker, with Sweetums coyly hiding in the back.

VetLab_Lab_2_1200

Incredibly, many of the characters are animated with LEGO gears and motors. Beaker’s mouth, of course, opens and closes, and Sweetums peaks in then goes back into hiding.

Down below in the operating room are Dr. Bob (aka Rowlf), Nurse Piggy, and Nurse Janice, along with their patients, a rabbit, a chicken, and Baskerville the Hound. Continue reading

WWBFD: What would Boba Fett drive?

As you sit there musing on your vast Star Wars knowledge, do you ever ask yourself WWBFD? That is, what would Boba Fett drive? Well, according to LEGO builder brickcitywhips, the answer is a Ferrari F40. And I have to say, they make a compelling argument with this wicked overhaul of the official LEGO Ferrari F40 Creator Expert set. Sure, it’s just a color swap (which is actually not even close to easy), but it’s also super sweet and absolutely makes me want to build some character-inspired vehicles of my own. Maybe an R2-D2 Volkswagen Camper Van?

This LEGO Pingu is just too adorable

If you grew up in the 90s watching European television, there’s a good chance you love Pingu. The stop-motion animated adventures of the adorable little penguin ran for over 15 years starting in 1990. Builder Johan Alexanderson has made four tiny LEGO scenes of an ordinary day in the life of Pingu as he putters about his nicely furnished Antarctic igloo. The penguins are an adorable mix of minifigure elements and bricks with a little customization for the eyes. Noot noot!

An ordinary day for LEGO Pingu

Pingu has appeared on TBB a few times in the past, including a previous scene by Johan where Pingu meets a walrus. We also highlighted a cute larger-scale Pingu.

This LEGO version of Sheriff Hopper’s cabin from Stranger Things looks perfect

Netflix’s hit show Stranger Things may be an unlikely candidate for a LEGO model, but builder Andrea Lattanzio is making it look amazing. This secluded cabin is the perfect safehouse for Eleven, and the shack’s dilapidated homeliness comes shining through in this recreation, which features perfect architectural details like uneven shingles and board siding (in some places made of sideways masonry bricks).

Stranger Things | Sheriff Hopper's Cabin + Chevrolet Blazer

Of course, it wouldn’t truly be complete without Sheriff Hopper and his 1980 Chevrolet Blazer. Andrea is a master of realistic LEGO vehicles, and the classic truck’s boxy style works perfectly in LEGO, and tan and dark tan give an authentic paint job for the small-town police department.

Stranger Things | Sheriff Hopper's Cabin + Chevrolet Blazer

Unlikely though it may be, this isn’t the first time we’ve seen Stranger Things LEGO creations. We’ve previously featured the various heroes in three different scales: minifigures, BrickHeadz, and miniland-scale characters.