Tag Archives: Monster

Need a hell-ping hand?

This five-fingered demon by Nathan Hake is an unconventional monster that makes for a suitably spooky way to celebrate Halloween. Inspired by cover art from an album by the Dead Pirates, Nathan has crafted plenty of character into this gruesome glove. The use of curved slopes and hinges creates a surprisingly anatomically accurate hand shape that feels like it could grab hold of anything. And a fortuitous lighting mishap gave the final pic a classic horror movie feel.

Hand or glove?

A monster has fallen into the sewer in LEGO City!

Are you old enough to remember Dirty Jobs? This scene from Shannon Sproule reminds me of that show. It’s easy to project the personality of Mike Rowe onto the hard-hatted figure descending into the sewer, particularly with the backstory that Gracie (as the monster is known) gets along just fine with the City workforce. It’s a fun little slice of life that shows we can all get along if we try. (And if we offer the monsters in our lives chicken legs and cheeseburgers.)

Mornin' Gracie!

We’ve featured a lot of monstrous creations over the years. Why not check them out?

So, head or no head?

Guys only want one thing and it’s disgusting. However, in the world of praying mantises, that doesn’t always work out. It’s the lady who gets the head — literally. Expert builder Djokson sets the table for a romantic candlelit dinner, with fancy tablecloth and a glass of wine. Lady mantis appears to have been stood up by her suitor, until her meal is served on a big platter.

Date Night

While this is a fun scene, we have to talk about NPU when we write about Djokson’s many ingenious creations. For example, Lady mantis wears pieces of cloth that can only be from either Scala or Belville — two old LEGO themes full of large dolls. It’s just hard for me to pinpoint which cloth piece is from which. However, the eye sockets of each mantis are the shoes of said dolls, with the good old minifigure arms wedged inside them. Other pieces include the rubbery Krana and Kraata from Bionicle, which Djokson uses in the head and stomach respectively. I also enjoy the use of the fantastical key element from LEGO Elves, which gives the elbows a spindly look.

I guess you could say Djokson’s builds make me… lose my head.

LEGO can’t really hurt me, right?

Is it a kaiju? A demon? Something from another planet? Whatever the answer, the Protoweapon XV1 – “Nightcrawler” – by Andrew Steele is certainly a threat to us all. With a form that’s an unholy fusion of mech and organic, this spikey beast is coming for us, and there’s nothing we can do about it. Personally, I hope I get done in by the clawed hands and not the yellowing clown grin.

Protoweapon XV1 - Nightcrawler

Click here to see the monster up close.

Do you want tentacle babies? Because that’s how you get tentacle babies!

There was a time when LEGO builder Grant Davis was a regular here at The Brothers Brick but lately he’s been as rare as truck nuts on a Prius. That’s because he’s been away at the university. But that’s all about to change because he is competing in the ever-popular Iron Builder competition against our friend and recent TBB alumni Benjamin Stenlund. Grant calls this one “The Experiment” and, like many sci-fi movies and Florida Man stories, it features toxic goo, tentacles, and a situation that’s about to get calamitous. This is only his first entry in this competition so we can expect to see plenty more from Grant and even Benjamin soon. Iron Builder always means job security for us. Speaking of job security for us, check out the other times we were totally gaga for Grant’s stuff.

The Experiment

The panic room of your childhood nightmares

Remember when your parents told you that there weren’t monsters under your bed, in your closet, or outside your window? Well, this LEGO build by Flickr user Brixe63 certainly paints a different picture. Not only are there monsters in this little brick-built room, but the room itself is also a monster!

Gefangen im Alptraum

The wallpaper for this room is built out of white and sand green plates and tiles. The monster window utilizes modified 1x1s and 1x2s with teeth pieces in white and red, depicting a bloody mouth fresh after a kill perhaps. Many dark green vine elements creep from the door or erupt through the walls and floor like tentacles looking for a fresh grab. There’s even a ghostly white minifigure hand reaching out from the little cabinet whose drawers are made out of brown bucket handles. The floor is made out of tiles laid on their sides not connecting to any studs, this is a good approach for this build as they can be arranged in a messier way in order to give the floor a lively appearance. This room is definitely a room out of a childhood nightmare, and I am glad I am not the poor minifigure lying in bed in terror.

Hang a left at the giant anemone

LEGO fan themes come and go, waxing and waning with the tides. But sometimes they burst back up from the ground like the nightmarish worm they are. The Black Anemone by Sebastian Arts (Aliencat!) harkens back to the simpler times when the old gods roamed the Earth. This build features organic curves, a splash of red in the extended tongue(?), inverted LEGO tires…everything you could ask for in a subterranean monster. But there are two small details that make this build fun for me. First is the LEGO minifigure skull cradled in the rings of the beast like a tiny teddy bear of death. The second is the road sign advising a hard left hand turn. That’s one detour that I think most people would be happy to take.

The Black Anemone

It’s been a few years since our last spotlighted Black Fantasy creation. Could this be the beginning of a revival? If so, is that a good thing? I’m honestly not sure.

Halloween this year brings a full moon, and a full moon brings...

It’s spooky season, and that means it’s time for spooky LEGO creations. And what’s spookier than Nathan Hake’s feasting werewolf? Spooky might even be an understatement, this thing is downright frightening. Maybe even scary.

Lego werewolf

It’s also incredibly well built. The werewolf itself is expertly sculpted using a plethora of bars and robot body parts, as well as ample minifigure hands for extra detail. There’s something meta about a vicious werewolf being built out of people’s hands! For me, the icing on this terrifying cake is the use of the sails from the Silent Mary, a somewhat haunted pirate ship, as ripped and torn clothes hanging off of the foul beast. Not to be overlooked is the expert scenery, acting as a backdrop. The lamppost elicits a Victorian vibe, an era that’s spooky in and of itself. Underneath the beast and the blood dripping from its mouth, the sidewalk tiles lay beautifully. Simple plates and tiles are arranged in a way to give the texture perfect for the setting.

It takes guts to build something like this

I have resorted to cheap puns to grab your attention with that title but now that you’re here, you’ve got to admit this is pretty cool. You’re looking at (or looking through) a new LEGO creation by Tino Poutianen called Glass Cerberus. The traditional guardian to the gates of hell is fearsome enough as a three-headed dog but the mythical creature has now seeped into nightmare territory. We’ve seen a lot of gutsy creations lately, what with it being close to Halloween and all. Now if only I could gain this hound’s favor perhaps we can find a favorable end to this post. Who’s a good boy? Who’s a good widdle boy? Just kidding! It all ends in unspeakable horror.

Glass Cerberus

Nightmarish creature will stomp on you

In case you ever wondered what would result if a scorpion and a spider got freaky and produced something even freakier, wonder no more. This nightmarish creation by Ivan Martynov reveals the result. While the legs might look a bit spindly, make no mistake, this creature is not to be trifled with.

Spider of Leng

Here’s looking at you, kid

This creepy build by Bart De Dobbelaer combines great LEGO part usage with eldritch horror. Or maybe this creature from beyond just wants to borrow a cup of flour. Who are we to judge by appearances? I mean, sure, the mouth full of tentacles ringed by dozens of teeth does seem a bit aggressive. But the multiple claws forming a spiky head of hair might just be a fashion statement. You know, like those DOTs bracelets that ring those not-at-all-evil eyes. The outer frame is pure evil, though. The gold accents may be shiny, but the expert use of brown organic curves of different thicknesses is unsettling in the extreme.

The abyss

Bart excels at finding just the right balance between craftsmanship and horror. Take a minute to check out some of the other creations that we’ve featured.

Werehyena is no laughing matter

What could be more frightening than being chased by a monster that is part human, and part predator? One that tends to laugh maniacally all the while! Yannick Godts has created a wonderfully detailed monster to give any werewolf a run for its money. The use of the dark tan-colored palm leaves makes the perfect ruff on the werehyena’s back, while a red hand is a great way to show the lolling tongue.

Bultungin