Tag Archives: Movies

Films and the cinema provide a lot of great inspiration for LEGO builders all over the world. You’ll find LEGO models inspired by everything from Mad Max to Toy Story here.

That’s odd, usually the blood gets off at the second floor.

If you’re feeling a bit unsettled but don’t know why, there’s a reason for it. If you’re totally feeling the heebie-jeebies and you do know why, then you, dear readers, are keen to the fact that this is a scene from The Shining. Alex Eylar recreates the pivotal scene in LEGO but got the idea and permission from Reddit user /u/thatbenguy23. (If that’s your real name!) It kind of makes you want to take the family out for a winter retreat at the Overlook Hotel, doesn’t it? Let’s take the elevator up. What can go wrong? While we’re waiting for that elevator, check out this melancholy scene by Alex we posted last May.

The Shining

Will Luxo Jr. ever be held responsible for its malicious letter smashing?

Paulville MOCs is no stranger to our pages, racking up almost as many hit creations as the Emeryville, CA-based animation studio Pixar. This little scene perfectly captures the multi-jointed lamp Luxo Jr and the distinctive company font with long serifs formed by partial clip connections and bit of flex tube.

Pixar Logo

Wondering what the letter “I” looked like before it got squashed by that devious lamp? Paulville’s got you covered.

The prominent minifigure torso in the lamp is the latest Iron Forge seed part being used by builders the world over in the latest free for all round. Our own Ben Stenlund recently used some to great effect as birdhouses.

LEGO sets for Disney’s Raya and the Last Dragon revealed [News]

Three LEGO sets for Disney’s upcoming animated film Raya and the Last Dragon have been revealed, thanks to retailer Learning Express Gifts. Raya was originally slated to premiere last November but has been bumped to March 5, when it will release simultaneously in theaters and on Disney+. The new LEGO sets are part of the Disney Princess lineup and feature minidolls rather than minifigures. The sets introduce a number of new elements for designs iconic to the movie, such as Raya’s conical straw hat and her pill bug-like companion Tuk Tuk, and of course, Sisu the dragon. There’s no word yet when the sets will be available for sale.

Click to see more of the LEGO Raya sets

Arvo brothers bring Robocop to life with LEGO – I’d buy that for a dollar!

If you haven’t heard of the Arvo Brothers before, they’re Ramon and Amador Alfaro Marcilla, a pair of Spanish builders who are known for truly amazing LEGO sculptures. Their latest effort pays tribute to the 1987 classic, RoboCop. Standing around 2 feet tall, this towering figure is a dead-on recreation of Peter Weller’s portrayal of the titular character and is filled with intricate and screen-accurate detailing.

The first thing that becomes apparent is that there’s a level of articulation built into this sculpture. The shoulders, elbow, and head can all be adjusted to create a variety of bad-ass poses. The next thing that you notice is the spectacular part usage. There are just a few LEGO studs exposed, enough to let you know what he’s made of, but so few that you’re still required to really lean in to be sure. Curved tiles and slopes are everywhere, smoothing out the shapes and creating a perfectly streamlined set of armor.

Continue reading

He may be Gandalf the White, but he’s looking rather grey today

Tragically underused in LEGO builds is the immersive, cinematic shot. Sure, it’s vastly easier and faster to build a vignette, or a stand-alone building, but I deeply admire builders who can move their creation beyond plastic bricks and into an entire world filling the frame. Nathan Smith is one of those builders, playing with light and camera angles to put the viewer in the scene in a believable way. Are there many mind-blowing building techniques on display here? No, not really, though that door does look quite nice. But nothing is out of place, with meticulously arranged leaves and crates, and the smooth walls of the citadel allow the lighting effects to shine. And shine they do, illuminating a ruminating Gandalf perfectly.

"Before the Siege"

Love LEGO builds inspired by The Lord of the Rings? Then check out the TBB LEGO Lord of the Rings archives. They’re epic!

LEGO Ghostbusters 10274 ECTO-1: Everybody can relax, I found the car. [Review]

The pandemic has had a pretty grim impact on cinematic release schedules this year. Ghostbusters: Afterlife was originally slated for a July 10th release, but is currently delayed to June 11, 2021. That left a lot of fans pretty unhappy…but LEGO has found a way to keep us busy while we wait for things to return to a new normal. Arguably the most beloved converted 1959 Cadillac Miller-Meteor ambulance of all time, the Ghostbusters ECTO-1 will be available directly via LEGO.com and LEGO Stores starting November 15th. This 2,352 piece set will retail for US $199.99 | CAN $259.99 | UK £179.99. What secrets does this new version of the ECTO-1 hold? Read on and see!

The LEGO Group sent The Brothers Brick an early copy of this set for review. Providing TBB with products for review guarantees neither coverage nor positive reviews.

Click to read the full hands-on review

This is no mine, it is a tomb

I’ve always loved this scene from The Fellowship of the Ring when the band makes their way into the Mines of Moria only to discover Balin and his dwarves have been wiped out. To me, it’s when the story first really turns an unexpected direction. Nathan Smith has beautifully recreated it in a LEGO diorama that perfectly imitates the scene’s camera angle and even lighting. From the scattered remnants of the dwarven miners, to the light on Gandalf’s magical staff, to the hobbits just barely visible in the doorway, this scene is just what I needed to take me back almost 20 years when I first saw the film.

"This is no mine, it is a tomb"

If Aragorn were running for president, I’d vote for him

I’ve said it before, and I’m sure I’ll repeat it, but I love The Lord of the Rings. The books, that is. Simon Hundsbichler must love the books, too, since he has finally finished the third installment of his trilogy, commemorating the climactic The Return of the King. I’ve been waiting for this one for a while, and it does not disappoint! From an incredible microscale Minas Tirith to an imposing Barad-dûr, every bit of this build is packed with great details and clever parts usages. Ogle that oliphaunt from Harad for a while, and admire the lever-arm orcs. There’s even an eagle and fell Nazgûl beast in the air!

The Return of the King

Did you miss the first two volumes? Check out Simon’s The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers builds here. And don’t miss the other great Lord of the Rings builds in our archives, too!

Mortgages are truly horrifying

I’m not the kind of guy who likes to watch horror movies; real life is scary enough, so why should my entertainment be scary, too? I mean, have you ever considered how much money you pay in interest on a 30-year mortgage? Terrifying! Add in taxes and maintenance, and it really does feel like my house is eating me. Now, I realize that Pieter Dennison built this incredible LEGO monster house after watching, well, Monster House, but I haven’t seen it. That doesn’t stop me from being frightened. Seriously, look at the state of those shingles, probably a slate roof that would take more than my left kidney to repair. And that siding needs fresh paint, if not a total tear-off (unless you slap some vinyl siding on top, like lipstick on a pig). And that front porch? There’s no way that railing is up to code. This is true horror, folks.

Monster House

Mad Max’s V8 Interceptor rides again

This sweet ride by Michael Kanemoto is looking mean in a way only classic muscle cars can. The black beast is a LEGO Technic scale recreation of Mad Max’s 1973 Ford Falcon, which is of course heavily modified and redubbed the V8 Interceptor. It appears here as it did in 1982’s Mad Max 2: Road Warrior, with massive fuel tanks mounted in back.

V8 Interceptor

Click to see more of the V8 Interceptor

Look at this stuff. Isn’t it neat? Wouldn’t you think my collection’s complete?

If you don’t recognise it, the title is a small excerpt of Part of Your World from Disney’s The Little Mermaid. (It’s also something I’ve never heard an adult fan of LEGO say when describing their collection.) Builder Konoyaro used the Disney movie as an inspiration for this creation and it looks stunning! The best part about this has to absolutely be the vibrant colours. Konoyaro used a lot of parts introduced in the Friends and Elves sets for the coral reef. Look how cute Sebastian and Flounder are on this scale. Small but still very recognisable. The award for best part used goes to the knit caps used as a shell bikini top. And I am really curious to how posable this figure is. It looks like it has joints in all the right places.

The Little Mermaid

On the shores of the sea comes the end of our fellowship in Middle-Earth

The bittersweet ending of The Lord of the Rings is a scene that impacted many readers and viewers such as myself. It is the last we see of our beloved heroes after so many trials and tribulations in their story. In this scene, our heroes join the elves on a boat departing Middle-Earth to “a far green country under a swift sunrise.” Many see this as an allegory for death and the journey beyond, whether it be heaven or something else. Like Bilbo, I like to think of this in a more optimistic way: a new adventure in an unfamiliar land. JNJ Bricks captured the moment in the Grey Havens right before their departure in a striking, immersive LEGO scene.

Grey Havens

The minifigures of Frodo, Gandalf, and the hobbits stand in the foreground, out of focus and facing away. The elves wait by the boat, ready to take them on their journey out of the completely brick-built harbour. LEGO parts make up everything in this scene, from the water to the sunset sky between the cliffs. My favourite detail, the arches, and towers across the water look just like the movie, despite being so small. The boat, being grey, is distinct enough to not blend into the background. The accuracy of this scene invokes the same emotion in me as I experience while reading the book or watching the movie. Now I am in the mood for some of Tolkien’s poetry…