Tag Archives: Vignette

Vignettes are like the haiku of the LEGO world. Usually built on a base 8 studs wide by 8 studs deep, vignettes show a little scene or a moment in time. But like written poetry, there’s plenty of variation on the basic theme.

The Letter that needed to be delivered to the Cupboard Under the Stairs

I’m always thrilled by tiny vignettes that squeeze in details that tell the story well. This vignette by Zed highlights the memorable scene in Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone when the Hogwarts invitation letter is delivered to Harry in the Cupboard Under the Stairs. Though not fully movie accurate — as I do recall the door of the Dursley’s home was at the bottom of the staircase — it makes more sense for this little vignette to have it on the opposite end. I still can’t figure out how LEGO elements were arranged to construct that sturdy-looking entrance door, but it certainly looks good.

A letter from Hogwarts

Sit down, open wide, and get ready for the fluoride

When I saw this dental chair built by Luis Peña, I was uncomfortably impressed. On one hand, it triggered anxiety about needing to schedule a dental appointment. At the same time, Luis’ attention to detail brought my teeth out of hiding with a beaming smile. The entire scene feels authentic, with a tilting chair, folding overhead lamp, and a drill. “Yikes!” Luis presented this lovely model to his sister-in-law, who is celebrating her 30th anniversary working as a dentist.

Dentist’s Office

These LEGO scenes from Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them are magical

The wizarding world is back with a new Fantastic Beasts movie this fall, and with it comes a whole bunch of new LEGO, such as Newt’s Case of Magical Creatures. Over the years we’ve featured a lot of great custom Wizarding World LEGO creations here on TBB, but these vignettes by Thorsten Bonsch are among my personal favorites, capturing some iconic scenes from the first Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, which was released to theaters in 2016.

The collection opens with Newt on the deck of the ship that will deliver him to New York. One of my favorite parts is the black robot arm that makes the armrest on the bench, which gives it a great wrought-iron look.
Fantastic Beasts 1

Next, there is the scene at the New York Customs station, where Newt disguises his mysterious case as an ordinary collection of mundane possessions. All of the other mini-figures in the scene are well suited to the time period. Also, this scene has some of the best floor textures I have seen in a while, including a simple 1×1 plate set upside down. Continue reading

This survivor of the apocalypse is not clowning around

Creating a street scene with real character is all about the details – big and small. And when it comes to post-apocalyptic scenes, like this street scene by Jan T. the best details are in the destruction and erosion of man-made structures as nature re-claims what is hers. I’m not sure how I feel about the clown. Either it would freak the heck out of me if I were to encounter him on the street, or it would bring a smile to my face, and we would share a laugh as we scrounged for supplies.

Nuke York

There are so many great parts used in this scene and one of my favorites is the use of the twisty stem surrounding the large leaf plant part that most of us just throw away. You can find these used as vines flowing in and out of the buildings. Then there is the mini-fig back brackets used to create a lovely architectural detail above the door on the left building. The broken walls and windows are also quite nice.

Take it easy for a little while

Everything appears chill and cozy in Heikki M’s LEGO scene of an attic apartment room. The attic implied with the sloped ceiling and the brick wall in the back of the room are top notch techniques in a scene full of fantastic detail to take in. I also appreciate the use of textured bricks in the rug. Is it suggesting a raised texture, or someone who walked through? You decide, but it’s great either way.

Night in the Attic Apartment

Off-road adventures with Land Rovers, Chevys and Scouts...Oh my!!

If you have been following The Brothers-Brick for a while, you might remember us sharing Pixel Fox’s off-roading vignettes. One of Pixel Fox’s hallmarks has been blending LEGO bricks with real-life materials for landscaping. His latest model is a spectacular Land Rover Discovery traveling through the African wilderness. The dirt may not be LEGO, but it doesn’t feel out of place and adds an air of authenticity to the vignette.

Land Rover Discovery Series 1

Next up, we have a bright orange International Scout. Originally introduced in 1961, the Scout is considered to be the forerunner of the modern SUV. This is a really fun scene by Pixel Fox that reminds us why we shouldn’t feed the bears.

International Harvester Scout 80

Last but not least is a 1970s Chevrolet C/K pickup truck, ripping through the swampland of the Southern U.S. This scene appears to utilize real water but, unlike real swamps, you would be hard-pressed to find any mosquitoes. It also features minifigures making some questionable decisions, but I guess what happens in the swamp stays in the swamp.

Chevrolet C/K 3rd Gen

Evil George seals the fate of a family of innocent mice

I ain’t gonna lie, I’m calling it as I see it. I see a character with a side profile eerily similar to George Lucas. And it seems like he’s trapped a family of mice in the crawlspaces behind the wall by not only cutting off their food supply but sealing their fate to starve, behind an inescapable wall. I guess George is just bored these days with little to look forward to since he sold the Star Wars franchise to Disney. If you’re wondering where builder Nick Sweetman got those sand-green wall patterned bricks, they’re pretty rare, since the piece only appeared in a single LEGO set, 76062 Batman Classic TV Series Batcave.

Who Ya Going Call ? Mice Busters

One tasty cup of coffee makes the day better

This wonderfully detailed coffee stand by LEGO 7 does not have a single brick out of place — from the hanging glasses rack to the roasting machine in back to those delicious pastries on display. Even the custom stickers and the logo on the apron of the baristas are a perfect choice.

DOLLY COFFEE

For even more details, check out this top view, featuring a grinder, outdoor tables, cash register, water cooler, and a professional looking espresso machine.

DOLLY COFFEE

Your very own mini portal for your daily commuting

It took me a moment to recall a round printed LEGO piece that Sheo. used for the whirl in the centre of this portal in his latest creation. And then it hit me — it’s a very nice use of dinosaur tails and small claws! The final result is a wonderful example of negative space done right with LEGO pieces. And now it’s not the minifigure in front of the portal, but the builder who is the true wizard.

Mini-Portal

The right place to practice your mystical arts

Enchantments, potions and magic! What else would one need? César Soares sure knows what is important in life – who cares about all that pointless real stuff, right? Joking aside, this is a pretty impressive creation. The builder says he has wanted to build in this scale for quite some time, and I can totally agree. Minifig utensils and the thicknesses of some bricks are often out of proportion with the minifigs they are made for, and that often looks very cartoony. This is not a bad thing on its own, but some times, it is nice to see more realistic Miniland scale creations like this one.

Enchantments, potions and magic!

I have said that this creation is impressive, and just being built in Miniland scale is obviously not enough to achieve that. The scene is filled with unique part usage, most notably cloth pieces. Just look at the broom and the unrolled scroll! And still there is more to see, like legs of the chair and table that are tilted off right angles, clever use of the log minifig costume under the table on the right and the wall texture, which uses a technique most often seen as floor, due to how unstable it would be when set upright. I wonder what kind of magic César used to keep it in place!

Too many cooks in the kitchen...

LEGO photography is an art in and of itself, as demonstrated by brickexplorer’s images shared on Instagram. This particular scene is cute and funny thanks to well-executed visual storytelling. It’s a tale of the guy who thinks he can cook but is so distracted by his pets that he sets his food on fire. Meanwhile, Brickexplorer’s failed little chef is oblivious to the woman shouting at him from behind. If the fish flopping around near the dishwasher is any indication, this guy is about as good at taking care of his pets as he is making dinner.

Everything about this scene is lively and fun to look at, thanks to the builder’s use of color and lighting. The way the sun shines brightly through the window reminds me of a morning sunrise. And editing the image to include smoke makes this scene all the more believable.

Just another day on Yavin IV

Star Wars is a pretty rich source for LEGO fans to find inspiration, and while we have featured many massive creations on TBB recently, especially as part of our Star Wars Day coverage (like the Death Star Hangar Bay or the crashed Star Destroyer on Jakku), sometimes a simpler scene can be just as magical. Take this vignette by LegoFin, for example. While there is nothing simple about that layered rockwork, which captures the look of the ancient Masassi temple perfectly, the scene shows a slice of life picture of a mechanic working to maintain the fleet of Rebel fighters, and a pilot sharing a moment.

Yavin IV: Base of Operations