Tag Archives: Vignette

Vignettes are like the haiku of the LEGO world. Usually built on a base 8 studs wide by 8 studs deep, vignettes show a little scene or a moment in time. But like written poetry, there’s plenty of variation on the basic theme.

Your very own mini portal for your daily commuting

It took me a moment to recall a round printed LEGO piece that Sheo. used for the whirl in the centre of this portal in his latest creation. And then it hit me — it’s a very nice use of dinosaur tails and small claws! The final result is a wonderful example of negative space done right with LEGO pieces. And now it’s not the minifigure in front of the portal, but the builder who is the true wizard.

Mini-Portal

The right place to practice your mystical arts

Enchantments, potions and magic! What else would one need? César Soares sure knows what is important in life – who cares about all that pointless real stuff, right? Joking aside, this is a pretty impressive creation. The builder says he has wanted to build in this scale for quite some time, and I can totally agree. Minifig utensils and the thicknesses of some bricks are often out of proportion with the minifigs they are made for, and that often looks very cartoony. This is not a bad thing on its own, but some times, it is nice to see more realistic Miniland scale creations like this one.

Enchantments, potions and magic!

I have said that this creation is impressive, and just being built in Miniland scale is obviously not enough to achieve that. The scene is filled with unique part usage, most notably cloth pieces. Just look at the broom and the unrolled scroll! And still there is more to see, like legs of the chair and table that are tilted off right angles, clever use of the log minifig costume under the table on the right and the wall texture, which uses a technique most often seen as floor, due to how unstable it would be when set upright. I wonder what kind of magic César used to keep it in place!

Too many cooks in the kitchen...

LEGO photography is an art in and of itself, as demonstrated by brickexplorer’s images shared on Instagram. This particular scene is cute and funny thanks to well-executed visual storytelling. It’s a tale of the guy who thinks he can cook but is so distracted by his pets that he sets his food on fire. Meanwhile, Brickexplorer’s failed little chef is oblivious to the woman shouting at him from behind. If the fish flopping around near the dishwasher is any indication, this guy is about as good at taking care of his pets as he is making dinner.

Everything about this scene is lively and fun to look at, thanks to the builder’s use of color and lighting. The way the sun shines brightly through the window reminds me of a morning sunrise. And editing the image to include smoke makes this scene all the more believable.

Just another day on Yavin IV

Star Wars is a pretty rich source for LEGO fans to find inspiration, and while we have featured many massive creations on TBB recently, especially as part of our Star Wars Day coverage (like the Death Star Hangar Bay or the crashed Star Destroyer on Jakku), sometimes a simpler scene can be just as magical. Take this vignette by LegoFin, for example. While there is nothing simple about that layered rockwork, which captures the look of the ancient Masassi temple perfectly, the scene shows a slice of life picture of a mechanic working to maintain the fleet of Rebel fighters, and a pilot sharing a moment.

Yavin IV: Base of Operations

Get on your bikes and ride

Here’s a fun vignette from Elspeth De Montes of a Technic figure bike mechanic working on his bicycles. Open drawers and containers full of tools and parts make the scene lively, but the bicycle model is the highlight here, showing off the excellent use of various bars, clips, and even a ray gun for the frame.

LEGO bike mechanic's workshop

Perhaps the most notable parts usage on Elspeth’s bicycle is the clear pulleys as wheels, which she says was inspired by a fellow builder. Elspeth’s bicycle model is fantastic, and you can build your own with this step-by-step breakdown.

LEGO bicycle breakdown

Massive LEGO Star Wars The Force Awakens scene depicts Rey in crashed Star Destroyer on Jakku

A three-week collaborative effort between Eli Willsea and Grant Davis resulted in a beautifully atmospheric LEGO diorama depicting Rey scavenging a derelict Star Destroyer from Star Wars Episode 7: The Force Awakens. The build itself is incredible, showcasing both builders’ talents in creating battle damage, believable layers of sand coverage, greebling, partially buried TIE fighters and Lambda shuttles, and behind it all the stark Imperial architecture. The lighting in the scene is practical, making use of bright lamps and a smoke machine to complete the aesthetic.

Scavenging The Destroyer

Grant has also shared a behind-the-scenes video showing a time-lapse of the diorama’s construction. The video shows just how much structure is necessary to support the large interior scene that makes Rey look so small. The builder walking back and forth adding bricks also proves just how huge the diorama is!

If you enjoyed Eli and Grant’s scene, you might also like the crashed Star Destroyer scene by KevFett2011.

A Miniature Mediterranean Masterpiece

One of the joys of building in microscale is the challenge of doing more with less. In “The Bull Girls,” flickr user Letranger Absurde has proven adept in the art of micro-building. The entire scene has a Mediterranean flair to it. In particular, the microfigure with the red dress reminds me of a Spanish flamenco dancer. You can even find a piece of a flamenco dancer in the thatched-roof building…literally! The curtain over the entrance is actually the dress from the Series 6 collectible minifigures flamenco dancer.

The Bullgirls

It’s amazing what one specific part can do bring a little LEGO creation to life, and this model is packed full of fun details. The use of the black wizard beard for hair is brilliant, and I’m a big fan of the roller skates & cupcake holders that make up the microfigures’ dresses. The curved tree trunk also adds a lot of character.

My favorite part is the bull, which uses brown frogs for legs, minifig arm for a tail, “gorilla fist” for a head, and white cattle horns that first appeared in the 1994 Pirates Islanders theme. It’s a truly inspired design!

An atmospheric moonlight cruise in unknown waters

The first word that comes to mind when describing this LEGO swamp scene is atmospheric. Markus Rollbühler has clearly been affected by the dark and damp Danish winter and channelled those dark thoughts when creating this scene The cinematic style is very well done, there are some really fantastic effects – rippling water surface, fog, huge depth of field and the soft lighting.  The scene shows some intrepid explorers paddling towards an orc settlement consisting of houses set on high stilts, it makes for a very eerie setting.

A Night in the Swamp

Taking a closer, clearer look at the Orc’s stilt houses reveals some fantastic details. The side panels are made from tracks and the hose stilts look suitably risky as an engineering feat. I love the simplicity of using the curled minifigure whips as a way to hang the lanterns, it’s very effective.

Click here to see a closer view of the swamp monsters

Explore Endor, Jakku and Hoth driving one these brilliant motion sculptures

Star Wars saga is all about two things – machines and locations. Of course, some may say it’s also about the Force, family relationship and friendship, but none of this would work without iconic spacecrafts and mesmerizing sceneries. Chris McVeigh reveals a very special collection of three vignettes featuring our favourite pieces of machinery. But what is absolutely cool about these builds is that each of them has a motion feature, which brings an AT-ST, the Millenium Falcon and an AT-AT to life with a simple turn of the crank.

AT-ST on Endor

Click here to see this adorable collection of moving models!

An artistic view of Italy, painted in bricks.

We have been enjoying a taste of Italy in a series of  photographs by  brickexplorer on Instagram. First we take in the view of a gondolier cruising along the famous canals of Venice. I love the combination of natural elements (be that water, sky or earth) with LEGO built surroundings.

Next, let’s stroll through the narrow cobbled streets in the old town.  A gatto is eyeing up a crossaint while some washing dries in the sun, what a peaceful scene.

Finally, as the sun goes down, it’s time to relax and enjoy some freshly made stone baked pizza. The lights inside the pizzeria make it seem so inviting,  I’m not sure how far people travel to enjoy theis infamous pizza, it looks like a rocket has just landed on the left.

The cuddly king of the north

I realize polar bears are an endangered species and killing machines, but can you blame me for wanting to pet one? Especially so after seeing this extra cute LEGO recreation by Jens Ohrndorf. The build expresses a lot of character and that is not just a consequence of using the eye tiles. The subtle angle of the neck and the shaping of the back are very characteristic for a polar bear. It is a feat of photography that Jens made the bear not blend in with the ice base under it.

Icebear 2.0The builder calls the photo on his Flickr Icebear 2.0, because it is actually a remake of an older build. The older version is well worth taking a look at, but the improvements in the updated build are quite obvious.