Tag Archives: Andrew Tate

Terminally pretty

Hot on the heels of a 1930s downtown street scene, LEGO builder Andrew Tate has now put together this fabulously retro airport arrivals hall. The tiled and patterned floor is a key element in lending this a smooth and shiny look, and the colors create something of a 70s vibe, but the other details are also spot-on. I like the little luggage carousel, but don’t miss the shop with its postcard rack and extensive selection of LEGO newspapers, the information desk and its pigeonhole wall, and most importantly, the well-signposted toilets. Throughout the model, there’s excellent used of official LEGO stickers and printed tiles, which add interest and detail without contributing too much visual clutter. The best bit of all? The map on the wall — fantastic use of quarter-tiles to make for a stylized yet immediately recognizable Mercator projection depiction of the world.

LEGO airport arrivals hall terminal

Everything’s great when you’re downtown

Take a trip back in time with Andrew Tate‘s bustling downtown scene, depicting a LEGO city during the 1930s. There’s a corner bakery, a menswear store, and a lovely cinema featuring the Egyptian architectural motifs popular on such buildings at the time. The streets are nicely busy, with a tram and a period-appropriate car, and packed full of minifigure action. In a refreshing change for a model set in such an era, there’s not a mobster to be seen! I particularly like the variety of colour and styling in the upper storeys of the buildings, and the top-most portion of the cinema frontage is just fabulous.

Welcome to the Coral Hotel, where your ocean view room is ready!

This gorgeous piece of LEGO architecture by Andrew Tate is an Art Deco fantasy. Growing up near beach towns as a kid I saw tons of places like this with names like The Dunes, Ocean Vista and The Tides. They were bright, cheerful buildings with tropical color schemes and sun burned beach goers coming in and out. I was fascinated by the various examples of architecture, which ranged from Art Deco design to that of the Atomic 50s.

The Coral Hotel

Get a closer look at this Art Deco architecture