Tag Archives: Architecture

LEGO provides the perfect medium for recreating the buildings and landmarks of the world — LEGO has even released a line of official LEGO Architecture sets. Check out our coverage of the official sets, and don’t miss all the gorgeous architectural models created by LEGO fans from around the world.

21037 LEGO House [Review]

Every child knows how easy it is to build a house with LEGO bricks. It’s almost impossible to build a bad-looking one. And the concept of “house” is pretty universal: 4 walls, a door, a window, and a roof — any form, any type and any materials you want. But what happens when you build a house based on an actual building that was originally designed to look like it was built with LEGO bricks? This mind-boggling concept hides behind the most unique LEGO Architecture set to date — 21097 LEGO House. Like other Architecture sets, this model is based on a real building, but this time it’s the LEGO House in Billund, Denmark that opened in September 2017. The set is only available at the LEGO House gift shop for 449 DKK (~$70 USD).

The box art shows off the model and its wonderful colours. The back displays the main feature — a removable second floor revealing the House’s spacious interior. This is a rare play feature amongst the relatively small Architecture models.

Click through to read our full review of this interesting and unusual set…
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Once upon a time in old Beijing

This diorama by vincentkiew showcases the beauty of traditional Chinese architecture and landscaping. A quaint courtyard and miniature garden completes the peaceful setting, and the use of the new Ninjago fences as well as the wallpaper brick are fantastic details that add style to the creation.

Once Upon A Time.. (35)

There are many delightful detail shots to discover in the Flickr gallery, or you can check them out in this slideshow accompanied by traditional Chinese music.

Once Upon A Time. (2)

Amazing detailed recreation of a city train station in Germany

The City Station of Trossingen in Germany built by Steffen Rau is simply breathtaking. The architectural detailing and color are astounding and eye-popping, with intricate features on the facade that look like it took some marvelously complex techniques to achieve that even an architect would be proud of. The siding just below the roof which was most likely wooden gives a beautiful compliment in color to the red roof tiling and a nice contrast with the mid-section in black and white.

Trossingen Station 6

The back of the building features the train tracks and a platform with minifigure commuters waiting for their train to arrive.

See more of this massive LEGO train station

25,000 bricks and 200 man hours for a LEGO chapel replica

Building a showcase that’s meant to be permanently displayed as a model in the very building is always going to be a challenge and an honor. Builder Julien Andries had the pleasure of showcasing his 25,000-brick replica model of a school chapel at the grand opening of the newly renovated building. Though I’m no expert in architecture, I’m willing to bet that the original building is probably more than a century old.

Commissioned model finished

Reference to the original chapel and comparison looks like Julien did an astounding job!

Original for comparison

The golden age of colonial Paris 1889

We are back visiting Paris in 1889 again with Castor Troy’s latest addition to his Steampunk-era rendition of the city. The Colonial Office has a striking black, white and gold color scheme with some beautiful architectural details. No expense has been spared in this particular office as a number of fancy gold elements can be found, such as the ornamental fences and, in particular, the Ninjago swords used in the roof to the far right. Castor has also created a great selection of minifigures to populate the uneven, grubby streets in front of the plush offices.Paris Steampunk 1889 - The Colonial Office

This is just one building in an incredible Paris 1889 collaboration, so you may enjoy another of Castor’s buildings that we highlighted a few weeks ago, The Lourve in 1889.

PARIS STEAMPUNK 1889

Learn from a LEGO master at the Royal Academy

There’s a whole medieval world created by LEGO fan builders as part of a role-playing game called Nine Kingdoms hosted by German-language site RogueBricks. Even RPGs need educational institutions and Markus Rollbühler has built the Royal Academy, a place for students to come and learn from the masters. There are lots of interesting LEGO techniques that we can also study at the Royal Academy with some fine LEGO construction and parts use on show. My eye was immediately drawn to the tree, with its foliage uniquely constructed using plumes of green feathers. I also love the bird’s nest sitting on the roof of the Academy, my ornithological knowledge is rather limited but it looks like a stork has made a home up there.

The Royal Academy

There are almost too many gems to mention, as the Academy itself has some lovely architectural details such as the beautifully shaped dormer windows. Can you spot the brown minifigure hockey sticks in the scene? There’s a lot to love in this creation and if you like this build, you will certainly enjoy spending a quiet summer evening at Markus’ windmill.

Incredible revenge is best served explosively

They say revenge is best served cold, but it seems like Syndrome is serving up his hot and explosive. monstrophonic has built a LEGO scene from The Incredibles featuring Syndrome and his Omnidroid attacking the superhero family. Our heroes are beating a hasty retreat as some impressive firepower rains down from above. The explosion has been nicely crafted, but it’s the fantastic architecture as the backdrop that makes this street scene truly awesome.

Syndrome's Revenge

The front on image doesn’t quite show the clever angles the builder has used to create a forced perspective effect. The view from above reveals the acutely angled buildings…

Syndrome's Revenge

A whimsical and woodsy cottage

This two-story cottage looks as though it belongs on top of Mount Crumpit or possibly deep within Fangorn Forest. Even with minimal (and rather muddy) landscaping, this ramshackle LEGO house by Pieter Dennison is spectacular! In addition to the wonderful curved roof and cobbled walls, this creation is full of intricate details such as wrought iron lanterns, laundry drying in the breeze, and creeping thorny vines (created with green minifig hands and sprues, possibly from this piece).

The cottage of old man Percy

Nature lovers will Lovell this modernist home

Lovell Health House is an International Style modernist residence designed and built by Richard Neutra between 1927 and 1929.  It was built for the active, health-conscious Lovell family in the hills of Los Angeles.  The house’s construction is rather interesting. In addition to the steel structure integrated with tension cables, the house is actually one of the first to use gunite. Mattias Søndergaard has captured Lovell House in LEGO form with its clean lines and overlapping planes perfectly suited to LEGO construction.

The Lovell Health House

Whilst the house sits nestled into the cliff surrounded by nature, Mattias has used some artistic license to give the natural flora of Los Angeles a ‘New Hampshire’ colour spectrum.

A palace fit for a minifigure queen

Royal palaces are normally buildings with amazing architecture, plush interiors and rich decoration, and this LEGO palace is no different. Built by Johan Keuterink, this huge modular palace has a few similarities to Buckingham Palace, not just in its Neoclassical architecture style, but also the two Royal Guards that the Queen has lent to protect the entrance! Although the Baroque details will not be to everyone’s taste, the aim is to impress visiting heads of state, and Johan’s palace should certainly achieve such an aim. I love intricate exterior street lights and the front door with some suitably impressive gold handles.

Modular Palace

Johan has taken the time to ensure that his palace has a lavishly decorated interior — Donatella Versace would feel at home in this house! The throne room is an example of the extensive details inside the palace with vast chandelier, patterned floor, and more gold than Fort Knox.

IMG_2562

Buying a round may render you penniless

When creating this digital LEGO model of three different buildings, Łukasz Libuszewski was inspired by the beautiful architecture of Prague. On the right, we have the pub on the ground floor and a museum showing the old town on the first floor. There is a handy cashpoint just outside the pub, so no excuses about running out of cash when it’s time to buy drinks. There is also a slightly abandoned looking tenement building on the left — it’s definitely in need of repair. Access to the lookout tower is via the central steps, but take care as those shadowy stairs look a little eerie to me.

OTP

A view from the rear shows some of the interior design with the old town layout in the museum and some cosy looking tables and chairs all set up in the pub below. I particularly like some of the architectural details such as the tan stonework around the window at the back of the pub and the use of the Elves keys in light blue grey within the look-out tower.

OTP

While this build is a digital build, it has been beautifully crafted and, although there a few elements that do not exist in LEGO’s official collection, it looks build-able ‘in the brick’

David Beckham receives a set of LEGO Stadiums for teams he’s played for during his career

What do you do when you hear of a famous Celebrity Fan of LEGO coming to town? You find out where he’s heading and you build him something that he would be delighted to have, and that’s what a few friends from Seoul, South Korea did when they found out the legendary David Beckham was coming to town. Led by Brian Yu the BrickMaster LUG recreated five iconic football stadiums that are homes for five clubs Beckham had played for during his professional career.

5 Football Stadiums

Click here for the story behind the gifts!