Tag Archives: Houses

A set of roofs you’ll absolutely a-door

The first in a trio of LEGO creations from different builders, this nefarious deal for a poisonous potion is brought to us by Eli Willsea. The wooden beams and boards creating the patchwork docks on which the vial of poison is exchanged are absolutely terrific. There’s some excellent use of the minifig hand to create ladder rungs, and just enough chaos in the various bar part choices to give that ramshackle feel. But the highlight of the build for me lies in the houses in the background. The color choices are perfect, and perfectly compliment the brown skeleton on which they’re all built. And those roof tiles! Each utilizing a different type of hinged panel (large entry door, kitchen cabinet door, or book cover), they are an absolute marvel to behold! The varied look between the domiciles shows off Eli’s design prowess while feeding that feel that this is the wrong side of town.

An Unsavory Deal

And if you’re wondering about the other two builds in the series, stay tuned!

This modern home is the perfect place to find yourself

Builder Sarah Beyer has crafted a home that looks like a high-end VRBO listing, and we’re wondering when we can check-in. The pine trees shading the swimming pool promise a getaway from civilization’s stresses. But the flat roof and terrace, along with a windowed conservatory, mean you can still relax inside with all the latest modern comforts.

Pineglade House MOC

Inside you’ll find everything you could want during a long weekend vacation; from the latest in home entertainment equipment to a dining area suitable for a romantic dinner for two. Does anyone know the WiFi password?

Pineglade House MOC. Dining area and kitchen.

Stop by this upgraded R.V. for a little R&R

Pan Noda just wowed us with a pair of houses traveling on sneakers, but now they’ve gone the other direction and made a mobile camper into a more permanent domicile. This busted RV has been upgraded with a ramshackle second and third story to become the perfect wilderness estate. There’s lots to do, from enjoying a meal around the campfire, to hanging the laundry on the roof, or playing on the world’s most precarious swing. For our younger readers, the mismatched colors and patchwork construction might call to mind the Weasley’s Burrow, but I’m reminded of the junkyard home of The Cadillac Cats from Heathcliff… You know, Hector, Wordsworth, and Mungo? No? Ugh, you kids today. No respect for the classics.

RV house

Baba Yaga? More like Baba Yeezys

You might have heard of Baba Yaga – a witch of eastern European folklore, who famously lived in a house that walked on chicken legs. Pan Noda has built a walking hut sporting a more modern choice of footwear — look at those sneakers! Whatever witch or wizard lives here certainly has taste. Perhaps they’re travelling long distances and don’t want their home getting sore feet. Either way, they’re certainly practically minded: The outhouse has been granted a pair of legs as well; I guess it means less plumbing to worry about. Even the mail box has walking appendages! This mobile home family is full of character, and with little context for the build we’re free to imagine our own fantastical story for them. Personally I like to think they’ve escaped from a Far Side comic strip – the whole scene is quite Larson-esque!

RV.B

Songwriters’ block is a thing of the past in this bard’s abode

I love seeing castle-themed builds that are a bit different. Francis Wiemelt (Hubba Blooba) has built this charming residence for a mediaeval bard, and there are so many cool little details! The most striking aspect is the roof, which has a very satisfying colour gradient using various shades of purple. The walls are also nicely done, with a neat cross beam at one end of the house. Light aqua pieces are judiciously placed to stop the pristine white making the place look too nice. It is the middle ages, after all; this place looks like it would be found in a clearing on the edge of town, it’s probably not easy to get decorators out that far. There’s plenty of life around this little cottage, including the bard herself with cuffs on her sleeves using 1×1 round plates. Take a look down to the bottom left, though – the tree has mushrooms growing on the side, in this case, tiles held on by clips; and best of all, there’s a little snail down there as well!

The Bard's Cottage

Whisk us away to the world of Malay

Sometimes a builder waits years for just the right LEGO pieces and colors to come out. That’s exactly what Vincent Kiew did in planning this lovely Kampung House. It took a while for LEGO to produce just the right pieces in dark brown and reddish-brown. The colors are alternated nicely here to replicate the indigenous craftsmanship used in these traditional dwellings. The stilts, shutters, even the intricate roof are all spot on. The chickens, the cat, the cow, even the cart full of vegetables help convey a feeling of relaxation and tranquility. I imagine the home would offer a cool reprise from the Malaysian heat. Vincent tells us this creation was based on a particular village house on Penang island. He also states that being a city-dweller growing up in Kuala Lumpur, he has not had the chance to stay in a Kampung House but his wife had when she was a child. She shared stories of her childhood with him as he worked on this project.

Kampung House.

This photo gives us a better glimpse of Vincent’s attention to detail. I’m loving the shutters, woodpile, as well as chickens languishing in the shade.

Kampung House.

Vincent closes out his write-up with a question; “does this creation remind you of your sweet childhood, too?” I imagine for our readers from the Malay Peninsula it might. As I was born in Woonsocket, Rhode Island, it doesn’t. In order to envision my childhood, you’d have to imagine cramped three-story walk-up apartments and simple Shaker-style New England homes. But still, we deeply appreciate you sharing your architectural sentiments from your part of the world.

Not your average farmer’s market

No matter what day of the week it is, it’s always nice to go to the local farmer’s market. Not only are the food and goods top-notch, they also have a nice atmosphere. Not unlike Andrew Tate‘s village grocer, which has a charming house rather than tents and food stalls. No doubt the fruits and vegetables sold outside in crates are locally grown, given the small-town feel of the build. The ground floor has a small convenience shop, and the rest of the house must be where the owners live.

Village Grocers

Andrew pays homage to a more famous LEGO grocer, a popular Modular Building set from 2008. The green and tan awning is similarly to the blue and white awning of the LEGO set, and both share the same white Fabuland lamp-posts. Andrew also references LEGO’s Winter Village series with this village grocer’s alpine architecture. It fits right in there, minus the cold and snow. Come to think of it, what’s Winter Village like when it’s not winter?

A rustic cottage just in time for spring

We’ve had a couple of warm days here in New York already, which means the time for long drives on scenic country routes is here. Eero Okkonen’s LEGO cottage model is just the type of home one would encounter on such excursions.

Villa Korpkuusi

What I love most about this brick-built dwelling is its imagined silo incorporated into the home’s build; you can find such a design in the real world. Okkonen utilizes many 1×2 plates in the formation of the dome topping his silo, while the house as a whole utilizes various bricks and differing slope pieces in varying configurations. The stone foundation of the home is rendered with ingots, slopes, bricks, and round-bottomed 2x2s in light grey, which complement the popping green evergreen trees Okkonen primarily fashions out of flower stem elements. Overall this is a timely model for the shifting of seasons.

Pippi Longstocking and Villa Villekulla

Ben Tritschler’s latest LEGO model triggers feelings of nostalgia for me. You might know her as Pippi Longstockings, Pippi Langkous, Pippi Langstrumpf, Fifi Brindacier, Pipi Calzaslargas or as Pippi Långstrump, which is her original Swedish name. In 2005 UNESCO published lists of the most widely translated books. In regard to children’s literature, Pippi Longstocking was listed as the fifth most widely translated work with versions in 70 different languages! Ben used the stories of Pippi as inspiration for his latest creation and it is truly remarkable. The resemblance between the LEGO model and the source material is uncanny. Ben used light yellow, a colour which isn’t that common which limits you as builder quite a lot. In the garden there is a big tree which uses a lot of tree trunk costumes for the tree trunk.

Pippi Longstocking and Villa Villekulla

Ben even put together figures for the main characters. And they are instantly recognizable. From left to right I present you: Captain Efraim Longstocking, Mrs. Prysselius, Tommy, Pippi, Annika, Kling and Klang.

Figbarf Pippi Longstocking

There’s no doubt a-boat it, that’s a fine house

Some LEGO elements really have only one use, at least, to most of us. But Nicolas Carlier has stepped up to the challenge and found a masterful way to use the LEGO boat part, used here as the frame for the front window of this precariously supported wizard’s house. I’m getting a bit of a Weasly’s Burrow vibe here, but that’s alright with me.

Wizard'S House

The Mountain, the Ocean and the River

I know we’ve featured the windmill before, but Hanwasyellowfirst made two additional builds called ‘Ocean House’ and ‘Riverside Scholars’ and they are exquisite! If these were LEGO sets, I would buy them in a heartbeat! There is a lot of creative parts usage in these buildings. I love how the spoked rounded top window look in combination with the ornamental lattice . There are quite a few different roof designs with all sorts of different parts used for shingles. Did you notice the fish ornamental used on top of the roof. I am not sure if Hanusedtobeyellow used it as a nod to the first LEGO ninja sets or if it is just a coincidence, but I am going for the first option. The riverside scholar building has the ornamental fence on it’s side, which looks stunning. The best thing about this building has to be the framing of the door and the foliage on the roof.

The Mountain Windmill, The Ocean House and The Riverside Scholars

It’s spring, springtime again

This past spring was pretty memorable, to say the least, but here’s to a more hopeful beginning. So what better way to celebrate the incoming season than a floral LEGO build that won’t cause a fit of pollen allergies? There’s much to love about the House of Flowers Konoyaro, from its striking dark red brickwork to its smaller details, like the Unikitty lupines. And aside from the Tudor-esque jettied and structural walls, the house is virtually void of 1x bricks. Instead, Konoyaro has opted for a variety of plate techniques, most notably stacked at the corners for a meticulous brick texture effect. You can also find more plates staggered at the base of the small bay window and surprisingly, in the loosely sculpted trees upfront. But my favorite detail by far is the brick-built front door. It’s a classy alternative to prefabricated doors that I’ll be taking note of for future inspiration.

House with Flowers

We’re no stranger to Konoyaro’s vibrant and textural brick building style. Dive into our archives to find their Little Mermaid build we’ve featured this past September!