Posts by Kyle Keller

Micro Nausicaä glides over a LEGO Sea of Corruption

I don’t think there are enough words to describe my love of the Studio Ghibli movie Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind. And the same can be said for this gorgeous LEGO build by Tino Poutiainen. The vibrant coloration of all the virulent fungi fits in perfectly with the aesthetic from the film, giving off that strong “poison arrow frog” vibe. Heavy use of round disks and plates, combined with more texturally complex parts create enough nooks and crannies to trigger some serious trypophobia. The skull of a long-dead God Warrior, resting atop the pile of fungi, is spot on. I especially like the use of old and new LEGO shades of gray to add some wear to the husk. But the icing on the cake here is the micro Nausicaä herself, soaring above on her mehve. Using under ten parts, it’s a shining jewel in an already brilliant crown.

The Sea of Corruption

The spice trade is dangerous business

From the Star Wars series The Book of Boba Fett, builder Ordo (Fabian B.) brings us a wonderful LEGO depiction of Fett and his Tusken Raider clan taking on the Pykes atop their repulsor train. There’s just some fantastic sculpting at the front of the train, using hinges and bars/clips to create the right domed shape for the nose. I also appreciate the texturing choices along the cylindrical engine, providing variety while at the same time focusing on clean lines. But what really takes the cake for me here is the speeder bike design! They look so lithe and agile, zooming across the Tatooine sands. And the clouds of dust they’re kicking up are ingeniously built!

Train Heist - The Book of Boba Fett

The Attack Titan is a smash hit!

Right on cue, Sandro Quattrini has come out with yet another outstanding LEGO build, this one from the Japanese manga/anime Attack on Titan. While I’ll fully admit that I’ve never watched or read any of the source material (I know, but we all have our flaws), I don’t have to be familiar with the show or books to see how impressive this build is! The Titan is caught mid-smash as it bursts through a wall, adding so much movement to a stationary build. All over the arms and chest, you can see the clever use of rods and other long, thin parts. This conveys all the raw power pouring out of this beast, tense muscles heaving forward with so much effort. Couple that bodily strain with an expertly-crafted face and the Titan’s rage seems to radiate out of the screen! Sandro has a reputation for expressive LEGO characters, but the Attack Titan’s excessively-toothed visage is some of their best work to date, in my opinion. And I can’t help but want to start on episode one of AoT thanks to this.

Attack Titan

Three new Obi-Wan Kenobi LEGO Star Wars sets revealed, including Jedi Starfighter and BrickHeadz [News]

Straight from the deserts of Tatooine, LEGO has premiered three new Star Wars sets today, all of them based on the Obi-Wan Kenobi series set to debut Friday, 5/27, on Disney+. These sets bring back some familiar faces from past Star Wars ventures beyond the titular Jedi, whether it’s a new Darth Vader Brickheadz design, or the Inquisitors of Star Wars Rebels fame in a new Krennic-esque transport. But the big milestone for LEGO in these sets appears in 75333 LEGO® Star Wars™ Obi-Wan Kenobi’s Jedi Starfighter™. Not only does this set offer an updated version of the starfighter, but it also includes Taun We, the first-ever Kaminoan minifigure outside of a video game. While the BrickHeadz set isn’t available for preorder, the two ships can be purchased now on LEGO’s website for shipment on August 1st.

We’ve got more on these new Star Wars sets below, and you can also check out the other upcoming LEGO releases for Summer 2022:


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You’ll fall for this Assassin’s Creed LEGO scene

In his latest LEGO build, W. Navarre posits an Assassin’s Creed video game set in Spain circa 1398. Our roguish hero is taking his hallmark “leap of faith” down to the streets below. But, while the assassin minifigure is clearly the focus of this build, I can’t help but admire the excellent buildings making up this Spanish city. There’s some excellent stonework displayed on the balconies, and of course the iconic terra cotta rooftops of Spain. And, while the vast majority of the build is sepia-toned, I love the pockets of bright color dappled throughout. A hint of light bright yellow on the side of a building, a splotch of turquoise visible through a window, and the occasional dark red roof tile all stand out, even in the fuzzy background.

Assassin's Creed: Spain 1398

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Best to avoid this sentinel of the void

The Lehvak-Kal, the latest LEGO build by Djokson, absolutely sucks, and I mean that entirely as a compliment! This swarm sentinel of the vacuum looks ready to consume all in it’s path with it’s nozzle-like claws. They’re on the ends of those excellently used pneumatic tubes, a part that’s notoriously difficult to build with. I also love the crafting of its smaller pair of arms and its mandibles. When I look at the Lehvak-Kal, I can almost hear it’s chittering. Although that doesn’t make much sense, when sound can’t propagate in a vacuum.

Lehvak-Kal

A hole lot of construction going on

There is so much going on in this LEGO construction scene assembled by Kashim K, and I’m not just talking about the well-posed minifigures. Everywhere I look, there are delightful uses of texture and color blocking to communicate different features in the build. Whether it’s the mechanics on the arm of the excavator, the patches of clay visible in the dirt, or the studs-out texturing on the white building, each surface offers a new tactile or visual experience that keeps the build dynamic. Even the transition from smooth wood slats to rough concrete walls in the pit hits the mark perfectly. But my favorite feature is below the road on the left side of Kashim’s creation. The pipes/tubes (visible in the ground thanks to the cutaway at the edge of the scene) are a strong reminder for those of us in the US to dial 811 before we undertake a project like this.

City-Scenery with a constructionsite

Koala-ty time at home

This quiet, marsupial-filled LEGO scene from Jane Gibbons-Eyre is exactly the vibe I want as I head into a much-needed vacation from work. The posing on her two koalas is fantastic, as are the perfectly-scaled chairs they’re sitting in. In fact, all the items in this tableau feel well-crafted and deliberate. The record player, the plie of books, the plate of food, the lamp – each piece stands on it’s own as an individual creation, and also as one part of a larger scene.

A quiet night in

More details in this serene scene below

Swords to plowshares

Spring has sprung, and farmers all across the northern hemisphere are headed back into the fields to prepare for harvest season. For example, Stefan Johansson has depicted a LEGO Ukrainian couple getting ready to test out their newly-acquired 40-ton harrow. But all joking aside, this creation speaks volumes on a universal truth: war doesn’t spare anyone. Whether it’s a soldier on the front lines or a farmer just trying to bring in their crop, the brutal attack on Ukraine has hit everyone in some way. And in times like these, when grandmas are taking out Russian drones with jars of pickled tomatoes, I’m reminded of a line from the video game Portal 2: “…when life gives you lemons, don’t make lemonade! Make life take the lemons back!”

Spring harvest in Ukraine

But I’m sure you didn’t come here for Cave Johnson quotes, so we should probably talk about the build. The color and style of the ground is exquisite, reminding me of walks through mint fields in northern Indiana. The sunflowers are simple, but extremely effective! I love the angles and texturing on the tank, but I think the tractor is the real star of the show here. You can see from the picture below, this machine has the look of a real LEGO set coming out of Billund. I can’t imagine it being built any better!

Massey Ferguson Tractor

In Spudkirk, it’s all about the little things

The fictional town of Spudkirk is home to this LEGO scene by builder Evancelt Lego, featuring a row of tiny townhouses and itsy-bitsy infantrymen. And the details here, even at this scale, are larger than life. The cobbling on the wall is excellent, demonstrating how war-weary the town must be. The use of color in the road, specifically the blotches of lime green and burnt orange, further the worn look of the town. And it does this without drawing too much attention away from the rest of the model. This allows other, more nuanced details to shine through, like that teensy tree on the left. The yellow-orange flowers as foliage on top of a trunk mostly composed of a brown stud shooter fits perfectly at this scale.

Quartering in Spudkirk

This outpost is in vogue

As we’ve seen in the past, Ayrlego knows how to throw together a pretty rad LEGO building. And this new Mokolei Outpost is no exception! But where their previous constructions typically show the wear of time, with nicks in the walls or peeling plaster, this tan and turquoise tower looks fresh and new. Of course, there’s the typical cobbled feel to the terrain. And the other wooden structures bear a weather-worn patina. But all of this comes in stark contrast to the crisp edges and detailed texture work on the outpost, with pristine lion-head sculptures and ornate patterns carved into each wall. It’s a design fit the chicest sheik.

Mokolei Outpost

A handy pile of stone and machinery

This latest build by Dark Small is quite the manual smattering of LEGO pieces. While no individual part feels quite at home in the creation, they come together to form five mechanical digits reaching for the sky. It’s impressive how, even while creating the distinctive hand shape in such an irregular manner, Dark Small still manages to enable such realistic posing of the fingers. As a result, the build comes off far more organic than it’s rocky and nuts-and-bolts make-up suggests. Combine the main piece with a killer background consisting of more mechano-terrain and some delicate flowers, and I’ve got to hand it to them: this is one impressive scene!

The forgotten hand