What does Marcellus Wallace look like?

“Say what again. I dare you. I double-dare you mister falcon.”

tablizm has used LEGO to capture the infamous scene from Pulp Fiction where Jules and Vincent demand the return of Marcellus Wallace’s briefcase. Poor Brett doesn’t look happy, probably because Jules just took a big bite out of his burger. All together now: “The path of the minifig is beset on all sides by the infinity of sorting and the terror of standing on a brick. And you will know my name is Lord Business when I lay my instructions upon thee..

What! Say what again one more time!

TBB Weekly Brick Report: LEGO news roundup for October 22, 2017 [News]

In addition to the best LEGO models created by builders all over the world, The Brothers Brick also brings you the best of LEGO news and reviews. This is our weekly Brick Report for the fourth week of October 2017.

21312_Prod

TBB NEWS: It has been a slow news week, but we still got launched into space and have a few days left to get double VIP points at the LEGO Shop online.


OTHER LEGO NEWS: This week only had a few other interesting LEGO-related news articles. Here are the best of the rest.

The most wanted man on the seven seas

Wooden leg, hook hand and an eyepatch – this pirate figure by LEGO 7 is exactly what one would think of when they hear the word “pirate”. The figure is more than just a perfect depiction of a stereotypical pirate captain, it is a great build combining complex angles in the torso, a simple yet effective face construction and beautifully detailed weapons. The captain’s remaining eye gives an impression of a charismatic character, additionally facilitated by the posture.

Captain Blackbeard

Porsche: There is no substitute

When I was a wee lad my mates were all about the Ferraris and Lamborghinis. Not me though, nor Serge S either. Don’t get me wrong — they are both highly skilled manufacturers of beautiful cars — but for me, nothing even comes close to the classic Porsche 911.

Early Porsche 911

With his faithful recreation of every curve and nuance of this early 911’s superb lines, Serge has lovingly furnished this crimson coloured Carrera with working doors, bonnet and trunk.

Early Porsche 911 Early Porsche 911

A classic speeder speeds in space

Step aside Rey, there’s a speedier Classic Space speeder in town.  Sad Brick has taken the idea of the Star Wars speeder bike and turned it into this grey, greeble-tastic bike complete with bumble-bee stripes on the side.  While the bike is cool-looking and fun, the landscape is really something else.  This is definitely Martian territory, with some weird looking, colourful flora…and perhaps fauna hiding amongst it.  I love the tall rock formations with the eerie red shapes appearing from behind.

Classic Speeder

The dust displaced in the wake of the speeder is just the icing on the cake for me.

A whimsical and woodsy cottage

This two-story cottage looks as though it belongs on top of Mount Crumpit or possibly deep within Fangorn Forest. Even with minimal (and rather muddy) landscaping, this ramshackle LEGO house by Pieter Dennison is spectacular! In addition to the wonderful curved roof and cobbled walls, this creation is full of intricate details such as wrought iron lanterns, laundry drying in the breeze, and creeping thorny vines (created with green minifig hands and sprues, possibly from this piece).

The cottage of old man Percy

By the dragon’s bones, this one’s a terror

Builder Jayfa is a Bionicle- and constraction-system whiz, and one of his latest technological terrors is this bone beast from the beyond. The skeleton dragon employs rows upon rows of tiny teeth for the vertebrae, and a marvelously sculpted head using largely classic System bricks perfectly incorporated into the constraction elements in the body. The aggressive pose helps bring the beast to life (or should that be undeath?), and Jayfa notes that it took a few revisions to get the creature to stand without supports, strengthening the legs and adjusting the balance.

Hex (now without stand)

Nature lovers will Lovell this modernist home

Lovell Health House is an International Style modernist residence designed and built by Richard Neutra between 1927 and 1929.  It was built for the active, health-conscious Lovell family in the hills of Los Angeles.  The house’s construction is rather interesting. In addition to the steel structure integrated with tension cables, the house is actually one of the first to use gunite. Mattias Søndergaard has captured Lovell House in LEGO form with its clean lines and overlapping planes perfectly suited to LEGO construction.

The Lovell Health House

Whilst the house sits nestled into the cliff surrounded by nature, Mattias has used some artistic license to give the natural flora of Los Angeles a ‘New Hampshire’ colour spectrum.

A crook with a hook and a flustered fabled fairy

A while ago, we featured a build from Jae Won Lee of a very emotionally stressed Tinker Bell. With this updated build in the picture, it all now makes sense. A larger-than-life Captain Hook seems to have captured Tinkerbell! I must admit those eyeballs set deep within his sockets give off a frightful look.

Captain HOOK 01

All is not what it seems as he has built a mechanical laugh to give life to the dastardly Hook – check out the video for it in action!

A singularly great ship called Prometheus

Ashes of the Singularity is a real-time strategy game set in a future where the technological Singularity and advanced “Post Humans” wage war against each other for the resource Turinium. Gilcelio Chagas has built a LEGO version of the Prometheus, a Post-Human Coalition capital ship that features in the game. The shaping of this ship is fantastic with the colour blocks of red providing a perfect highlight. There’s a lot of weaponry on show with imposing turrets and guns visible throughout the ship.

Prometheus

I love the angled slope of the hull and the red highlights, but my favourite detail is definitely the use of the wheel rims and light blue interior along the outer edges of the ship. Are these for power? weapons? steering? No idea, but I love them.

Deep in the forest, in a hidden place...

The LEGO Elves theme has some of the most unique sets of recent years, but we rarely see any custom creations inspired by this official theme. There are exceptions, of course, and the exception we are looking at today is Sean Mayo‘s Fairy Tree House. This build was set on display in the LEGO House’s Masterpiece Gallery, which may shed some light on the choice of theme. Indeed, if I had to choose builders to showcase their work in the LEGO House, Sean Mayo would be very near the top of the list.

Fairy Tree House

The focal point is obviously the tree with a quaint little house at the top, both crafted masterfully. The surrounding deserves some attention too; the overgrowth is exploding with imagination (The ferns are made out of grill tiles!) and the rocks, while simplistic in technique, work really well – it really shows how a top builder can make any technique look good. My favourite part is the little boat, though. There are so many curves all over that give it a whimsical and organic look.

Doing a stand-up job of keeping hobbits out of Mordor

Barad-dûr — or as most people will know it, that tall black scary thing that can see very far — has magical properties and scares hobbits. Created by Koen, this intricate reconstruction of the Dark Tower is about as tall as the LEGO Saturn V. The bright Eye of Sauron and glowing lava stand out instantly, but it’s not until you look close that you notice the amazingly fine details. I love how the builder has integrated the blacks and greys around the base of the tower and the hundreds of spires, ramparts and turrets adorning Lord Sauron’s base of operations.

Barad-dûr

Then at last his gaze was held: wall upon wall, battlement upon battlement, black tower of adamant, he saw it: Barad-dûr, Fortress of Sauron. All hope left him.