Tag Archives: Music

Just like many other artists, LEGO builders find inspiration in the music they listen to as they create the wonderful models you see here on The Brothers Brick. It’s no surprise, then, that music inspires many LEGO models more directly, from minifig musicians to album art recreated with bricks.

Get some high fidelity from this tubular amp

Prepare yourself for the high quality sound coming from this valve amplifier by LEGO LowNotes. While built from LEGO, I have no doubt in the capabilities of this amp with a little imagination! The first thing that strikes me are the large tubes with those warm filaments. Red and orange transparent studs give the filaments that glowing look. Bars comprise the input/output needles in the center of the control panel with transparent doors for the glass. Valve amps are favored for their warm tones, higher fidelity, and softer clipping thresholds, and everything about this build is just as smooth and crisp. This build could easily blend in with any audio setup–the only thing to give it away is the lack of cords coming out the back.

LEGO Amp

God Save the Queen – A Night at the Opera

Is this the real life? Or is this just fantasy? Nick Jensen brings us a fantastic LEGO album cover for Queen’s A Night at the Opera. This album is in Good Company with the other Queen builds Nick has done in the past and would make Freddie proud! The flex tubing script makes me feel like dancing in the rain. The details achieved in such a small space is superb. Open your eyes, look up to the skies and see the detail on the great lions, fiery crab, and majestic swan as the centerpiece here. I can honestly say that this album is the Love of My Life and Nick, I think You’re My Best Friend. You can find me Lazing on a Sunday Afternoon listening to Death on Two Legs now! Any way the wind blows…

LEGO Queen — A Night At The Opera

Live from Lunar Base One: The Moon Rocks!

Meet The Moon Rocks, the grooviest and most rockin’ band this side of Alpha Centauri! Composed by Julius von Brunk, this LEGO build will knock your socks off with the hard rock jamming coming from this moon base. Check out the station they’re playing at — there are a lot of cool details making up the workings of the space base. The cool bendy tubing on the walls and the rocky foundation are awesome, but take a look at the mosaics. They possess fantastic details despite some plate color limitations. On the left, a window looks at Earth, no doubt experiencing some serious FOMO for the party happening on the moon! On the right is a huge jumbotron screen showcasing the band’s lead singer as they push the speakers to the max.

The Moon Rocks

Check out the concert!

Music to the ears and eyes

I don’t know about you, but if someone said the phrase “the Muse of Song” to me, I would have assumed they were talking about a pseudo-prog-rock band from England. Kitkat1414, who is clearly much more learned than me, has instead taken inspiration from this phrase of Greek literature to create a stunner of a build entitled “the Sweet Sound of Blossom”. The sculpting here is terrific (particularly the piano – look at the pedals!), but it’s the use of colour that stands out to me. Building solid blocks of white is a bold choice as it can be difficult to pick out details, but the green and blue hues of the surrounding foliage give enough contrast to the build without being too overbearing. What does draw the eye are the muse’s dark red hair and her dress made from teal (which as we all know, is the best LEGO colour). These serve to pull the viewer into Euterpe herself, while the focus is gradually drawn away by the creeping vines and plants. In fact, the whole composition of this piece just hits all the right notes! (I’m here all week, try the fish…)

The Sweet Sound of Blossom

Classic Aerosmith album Just Push Play cover in LEGO

LEGO builder Adnan Lotia is a self-described Rumpelstiltskin who “converts music into LEGO.” Specifically, he takes classic album covers that we have spent hours zoning out to as our favorite songs play and somehow breathes new life into them as truly inspired 28 x 28 mosaics. Squint your eyes and they look like the real thing! Take this recreation of Aerosmith’s 2001 album “Just Push Play” featuring the fembot artwork of Hajime Sorayama (don’t image search him if you are at work). The dazzling chrome of the original is achieved with the most subtle combination of blues. Eagle-eyed viewers will note the edge of the dress features the brand new yellow 3 x 3 macaroni tile that I have only seen in 43202: The Madrigal House.

What I love so much about his work is that he could have just done a lazy pixel to 1×1 round-tile conversion like in the Beatles mosaics. Instead, he uses unique parts to do this amazing optical mixing trick that totally destroys my brain. Look closely at each mosaic and you will see they are full of tiny visual puns: the orange bars that somehow reproduce neon on a Dave Matthews Band cover, the 2×3 plant leaf that turns into Prince’s chest hair, the blur logo that looks like it has always been represented in LEGO tiles.

PoweredUp record player with brick-built melodies

If there’s one thing people in my life know about me, it’s my love of LEGO. I’ve probably bored enough of them out of their mind at this point to recognize when their eyes begin to glaze over as they start thinking of their groceries. So when something like this comes along and even non-LEGO fanatics are fascinated by it, I relish the moment. This model surely deserves attention, but it’s one you have to hear to appreciate. A stroke of ingenuity led builder Peter Zieske to create this adorable, azure record player that actually works.

Build-A-Melody working record player

The music notes adorning the sides are clever decorations made possible by the Trolls line. A brick-built speaker and knob on the front complete the pleasing clamshell design which opens up to reveal the needle and the turntable.

Build-A-Melody working record player

Let’s take a peek under the record and see how the magic is made. Thanks to a Boost Color sensor and an app, Peter was able to elevate this from imitation to working model. The sensor reads the different colored circular tiles under the brick-built record and communicates with the app to play different tones. I imagine Peter was pretty excited to get this working so the Ode to Joy is quite an appropriate first song.

Packed away inside the beautiful body of this model, in addition to the color sensor, is a motor for the turntable and a Powered UP hub to control it all. The technology fits nicely inside the frame, especially when you consider that this isn’t a full-sized record player.

Build-A-Melody working record player

This is an impressive build that suggests the possibilities that LEGO provides us. I can’t help but imagine how many songs could be made with this or what a few more color sensors and a bigger turntable could do. Models like this can go beyond the lines of diehard LEGO fans to music fans and record collectors. Builder Peter Zieske should put on his favorite record, sit back, and savor this accomplishment.

This is what it sounds like when doves cry

Prince is, of course, a music legend who left us too soon. However, he’s also notable for totally nailing his passport photo. I mean, DAMN! How can he look that good? Who doesn’t resemble a crazed maniac in their passport photos? Speaking of crazed maniacs, Paul Hetherington is one of the most talented LEGO artists we know. On the stage of his newest creation, we have the inimitable Prince and the Revolution, but flanking them are Majesty and Divinity, Prince’s beloved doves. This piece also includes Prince’s signature purple piano, firepole, and bathtub.

LEGO Prince and the Revolution

A closer look at the band members and we see a striking resemblance to Wendy and Lisa, Doctor Fink, BobbyZ, and Brownmark, all of which were carefully crafted from existing LEGO minifigure parts. If you’re looking at Prince and thinking whoa, hang on there Sonny Jim, what is going on here? Well, he is a custom-made figure by Citizen Brick and features Crazy Arms made by Crazy Bricks. Us LEGO people get by with a little help from our friends which, I’m aware, is completely the wrong band and song reference.

LEGO Prince and the Revolution

If you’re loving this and are totally jonesing for all things Paul, then we got you covered. If, by chance, you want to know what it sounds like when a TBB writer cries, then remind me to show you my passport photo. Oy, what was I thinking with that face? Like a burst sofa!

Bold colors and some fresh beats

Virva Staccato is ready to tear the house down! Inspired by the drum kit from LEGO Friends set 41449 Andrea’s Family House, this exceptional drummer can only be the work of uber-talented artist, Eero Okkonen. The funky color scheme gives the character a ton of flair and attitude, but it’s the parts usage that gives it the wow factor. Details from the house, like the window shutters on her top and 1x2x2 trans opalescent window panes for the glasses. I’m also a big fan of the pigtails from tires and Hero Factory robot legs for earings.

Virva Staccato

This has to be one of my all-time favorites, but it’s hard to choose from all of Eero’s other great LEGO characters we featured! Stick around and check out a few more!

Even a robot band needs a space tour bus

I finally realised why Daft Punk decided to retire a few months ago. There is a new robot band in town. Meet Solid State, a four-piece robotic pop group from the future. Serving in the LEGO Classic Space fleet aboard a remote outpost, they overrode their programming and abandoned their boring jobs. Instead of becoming murder-bots, they did what all young insurgent mechanoids should do: unleash their creative circuits in crafting music that explores life from a mechanical perspective. In other words, “beep beep beep.” Classic Space robot expert and Solid State groupie Tim Goddard even built a tour bus to help Solid State travel to perform at gigs. It totally matches the band’s brand – grey, mechanical, and goes beep beep beep. Most importantly, there is ample room in the back for the whole band plus all their equipment. While it’s not the most luxurious vehicle that musicians and space influencers like to flaunt, it’s perfect for the up-and-coming group.

Solid State tour bus

Beep is Solid State’s debut single, as seen in the beautifully made LEGO stop-motion music video below. The song is upbeat and catchy, and exactly what you would expect from robots. It’s all performed by LEGO Space legend Peter Reid and fellow space builders Jeremy Williams, Drew Hamilton, and Chris Salt, who built the band and their equipment.

Solid State consists of: Keko (Peter Reid, vocals/guitar/synths), Mason (Jeremy Williams, decks/vocals/programming), Wami (Drew Hamilton, bass/keys), and Biz (Chris Salt, drums). A four song EP Zeros and Ones will be released later this year, and I for one, am very excited for more robot noises!

You wanted a CD player for your speeder bike, right?

There’s creative part usage, then there’s what Mitch Phillips has accomplished with Frequency Clipper.  You might recognize that old-school Insectoids wing at the rear, or the Hero Factory shoulder armor on the sides. But the key feature has to be that Bionicle Borahk CD-ROM at the front. Talk about taking your tunes wherever you go…

Frequency Clipper

In the mood for more great Speeder Bikes? Cruise our archives for more creative builds!

A flying Flying V? That’s unexpected.

The Cyber Metal 2, a speeder bike with some highly unusual styling, is a fun creation from Julius Kanand.  Sure, you’ve probably heard of Flying V guitars, but how do you like this flying Flying V? I’m particularly fond of the transparent bright green accents, the speaker cones that double as thrusters, and the use of 1×1 round speaker tiles. Part Doof Wagon, part Star Wars, this build is music to our ears.

Cyber Metal 2
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All hail the king the of the wolves

Never having read Twilight, I must confess I’m not too familiar with Werewolf social hierarchies. But it’s pretty clear that this LEGO werewolf is preeminent among his canine peers, given the crown. Inspired by artwork from Powerwolf, a German metal band, (because of course it is) this vignette by Revan New depicts the Lupus Dei terrorizing a town. Revan has captured the wolf’s snarling visage perfectly with a jumble of pieces that includes wings, teeth, and minifigure arms. I think the best detail, though, is also one of the simplest: the cross clutched in his right hand, which is made of just five elements: a round 2×2 tile and four 1×1 clips.

Powerwolf * Sacred and Wild