Tag Archives: Jens Ohrndorf

I never get tired of a good octopus

I can think of no creature on this earth more mysterious and otherworldly than the Octopus, with its lack of any bones, three hearts, and 8 seemingly autonomous arms, and a magical grace in the water. I’m not the only one who is a fan of the octopi (one of few creatures with multiple plural forms to go with their other multiple parts) Jens Ohrndorf has put together a simple but interesting model of an octopus seeking a crab lunch. While the use of tires is great at the base of the arms, I am most impressed with the clever use of a space rock to form the large body.

There once was an impatient caterpillar

This adorable LEGO caterpillar built by Jens Ohrndorf is the perfect illustration for a children’s storybook. Just the critter alone is cute, from his paint-roller antennae to his “fuzzy” body and flower-stem spines. But when you add those balloons, it’s magic. It really does give the illusion of this fellow’s body being lifted up. He didn’t quite use enough, though! Don’t worry little buddy! Be patient and someday soon you’ll be a beautiful butterfly!

Jens is great at giving his builds life and that spark of character. Just check out this fun cactus!

The esteemed astronomer and warlock

When I was a kid, my first introduction to Merlin was in the Disney animated movie, The Sword in the Stone. It has remained one of my favorite movies to this day, though I’ve learned that most depictions of Merlin are quite different. Seeing this LEGO build by Jens Ohrndorf, immediately brings me back to that beloved movie and character. The real triumph, though, is that stellar telescope. Using the palm tree trunk element to create the flared end gives it the perfect look.

Any true fan of the movie will know that the one thing missing is Archimedes, the owl. But don’t worry, Tyler Clites has us covered! And if you can’t get enough, we also have many more articles about owls, wizards, and magic.

No hokey pokey, but maybe a little spikey salsa music

This little melocactus may have sleepy eyes, but he’s not entirely mellow! Check out those spines and muscular maraca-weilding arms! Carefully crafted in LEGO form, Jens Orndorf has shown how a part with seemingly few build possibilities could be transformed into something fun. What better way to use a marbled green sphere (2 11×11 hemispheres) than to wrap it in stem-covered ridged hose and make it a cactus? Even better: give it a mustache and the expression of a mariachi singer. 

And now for some fun facts! The “melo” in melocactus refers to the melon shape of this cacti family. But the latin root of melo also means music, so this is meant to be! Another fun coincidence is that this type of cactus can be found in Cuba, the birthplace of salsa music!

If you would like to see more from Jens, check out these tiny elephants! Or maybe you’ll love this colorful little train!

The perfect time piece

A LEGO builder’s mind is trained to see creative possibilities in the most obscure elements. Jens Ohrndorf’s lateral thinking has come up with a perfect practical application for the 1 x 1 white plate with black square print. His beautiful metronome lines up the printed bricks to create the tempo selection gauges at aesthetically pleasing single plate intervals. Along with other neat choices like the winder key give the build the intended feel of a real world object.

Cute from tusk to... tail?

You gotta love it when you see a cool use of parts and wonder, “Why the heck didn’t I think of that?” One of the greatest things about the LEGO community is that we are in a wonderful position to share ideas with each other, all over the world. Inspiration makes us all better builders. And Jens Ohrndorf is certainly a builder who sparks creative ideas. These adorable little pachyderms are part of a menagerie of expertly crafted creatures. Many of which use clever techniques to achieve character. For example, the use of the Unikitty tail element for an elephant trunk is brilliant!

Mini Elephants

Anxious to see another technique from this builder? Check out these vultures, or perhaps a polar bear. Not into animals? Maybe this awesome toy train will interest you!

All aboard the wooden railway!

While the LEGO Group is famous for plastic building bricks, the foundation of the company was built on the success of its wooden toys. In light of this, it’s charming to see LEGO fans like Jens Ohrndorf making brick-built versions of classic wooden toys, including this train set. Jens’ model is reminiscent of the wooden railway toys made by BRIO of Sweden, capturing the colorful simplicity of these vintage pull-toys. The iconic metal axles found on BRIO trains are represented by 1×1 round tiles in silver.