Tag Archives: Diorama

There’s nothing like a massive LEGO diorama to prove that you’ve arrived as a LEGO builder. The LEGO dioramas we feature here span everything from realistic medieval castles to scenes from World War II, and more than a few post-apocalyptic wastelands.

Rewind the scene and play it again, and again, and again...

The wonderful thing about LEGO building is that we get to see the same thing built again and again yet they come out very different each time. This build by GolPlaysWithLego does it yet again and that never cease to amaze me. It reminds me when I was younger and had to keep rewinding my favourite scenes from Star Wars on the VHS countless times just to enjoy the coolness of it all. This scene from the planet Hoth is filled with the tiny goodness of a couple of Snowspeeders, an AT-ST and the big baddie AT-AT. I love how the red elements on the Snowspeeder break the monotony of the muted colors and both partially in motion seconds before the mighty AT-AT takes a fall.

Nanofigure-scaled AT-AT LEGO MOC v4.0

Nanofigure-scaled AT-AT LEGO MOC v4.0

When did you last let your heart take flight?

“Welcome to Agrabah. City of Mystery, of Enchantment, and the finest merchandise this side of the River Jordan…” This cool little LEGO Disney diorama by Peter Ilmrud captures both the exotic atmosphere of Aladdin’s hometown, and a real sense of action and excitement with characters leaping around the rooftops and the magic carpet soaring above. With multiple minifigures crammed into its tight circular footprint, the model has some nice detail in the framing walls. I particularly like the use of panel pieces to provide architectural texture to the top of the buildings. The only slightly jarring note for me is the mixing of regular minifigs with Friends-style mini-dolls — a form of LEGO heresy in some parts — but the overall scene is so nice we’ll let it slide.

A Day In Agrabah

Relive the battle of Sokovia from The Avengers: Age of Ultron in this huge collaborative display

The Marvel Cinematic Universe has given us some epic spectacles in recent years, with the battle of Sokovia from The Avengers: Age of Ultron being one of the biggest. Inevitably it would take a team of super-talented builders to replicate the movie’s centre piece in LEGO form; step forward SaltyLUG who amazingly have achieved just this.
Ultronscene
Displayed at Brickfair Virginia, this sprawling scene captures the key scenes from the battle in a single diorama. Amongst the exquisitely built streets mayhem’s breaking out everywhere. Look closely at the front of the church and you’ll find Thor, Vision and Iron Man confronting Ultron. Elsewhere Utron’s army causes havoc amongst the general populace. Inside the Novi Grad church the rest of the Avengers prevent further sentries from reaching and deactivating the repulsors keeping the chunk of Sokovia afloat.

There are many more details and several Easter eggs to find if you look close enough. The group have also recorded the development of the project on NS Brick Designs’ blog.

A market where you can buy cartoony and sell realistic

LEGO castle is one of the most perfected themes hobbyists build in, with nearly standardized textures and all sorts of solutions to build your perfect castle or medieval village. There is a price that comes with this, because just trying to build the best medieval creation you can some times is not enough. Originality has split the theme in question into two wider categories: cartoony style with crazy colours and rugged pseudo-realistic builds containing almost exclusively earth tones. Mountain Hobbit has a bit of both, especially noticeable in his latest creation, the Wefyrf Valley Wheat – Market

Wefyrf Valley Wheat - Market

The landscaping is very neat with flowing curved shapes giving the village a realistic setting, and the dense treetops add to that too. But we should focus on the main part of the build, the village in the centre. The builder uses some wacky shapes for the walls of the houses that are set at a slight angle that still seems believable and coupled by natural colours they almost look realistic, but still somewhat joyfully cartoony – something LEGO bricks do not naturally lend to physically, but definitely do conceptually as a child’s toy in its basic purpose.

Blacktron attack on Redstone Five

Last year LEGO model builder Moto debuted his dazzling Chrysalis spaceship, and recently at Denver Comic-Con he enhanced his original creation with a space dragon attack on a remote space base with space heroes on the defensive. In the builder’s own words- “While performing standard maintenance, the Redstone 5 launchpad has come under attack from the Blacktron Dragon Obscurtronum!” and you can see the brave efforts the base occupants are making to guard against the assault.

Blacktron attack on Redstone Five

The star of the show here is still undoubtedly the Chrysalis ship, which shines on the screen even better now with a contrasting background element and the bustle of the battle scene.

Blacktron attack on Redstone Five - Back

The only place where you can trade chocolate for dragon eggs

The LEGO Elves theme keeps surprising me personally with how popular it is amongst fans. While the related LEGO Friends remains successful, it is the Elves with their characteristic motives and colours that keeps inspiring builders to expand the story on their own. The rich world surpasses its target audience and as Martin Harris proves, there is something for everyone in it.

The Elvan sea port of Elvadion

The Elvan sea port of Elvadion is an epic diorama showing us a less adventurous slice of life in Elvendale. There is everything one could expect of an Elves creation here, from bright colours and ornate architecture to cute animals, including dragons.

Click to explore the port town more closely!

Cube art, but without the Cubism

Creativity and art are closely related concepts, and there are few things that promote creativity as much as LEGO bricks. As a result, LEGO fan creations often turn out to be the subtlest works of art, as builders express themselves without the pressure of being serious or conveying some deeper meaning or emotion. But in other examples, like this one by Anthony Wilsonn, the main purpose of the creation is indeed to carry an artistic meaning.

Sanctuary 64

The creation seems to be a composition of different, seemingly unrelated pillars and statues set in a natural environment that connects them to a coherent whole. The most impressive parts are set in the centre of the image — the square “arch” and the blossoming tree growing around it. Anthony provides a bit of story to the build, but he still leaves it vague enough that the creation remains open to our interpretations.

The grace of disgrace: an incredible resurrected dragon

It appears Aaron Newman has developed an affinity for flying elements in his LEGO creations, as they appear in several of his latest builds. Floating and flying parts are nothing new, but few builders take the effort of going the extra step to make them look this good (presumably by digitally editing out the supports–or maybe learning black magic and making parts float for real!).

Triumph of the Skelemancer

Aaron has used his editing and presentation magic on more than just the flying draconic skeleton. The purple light emanating from the circle on the ground was achieved with a glass table and a lot of effort, while Aaron says the backlit stained glass windows were just as difficult to get right. We should not ignore the actual LEGO build though. It is all about atmosphere here and every part helps create it. The architecture with the circular design of the hall gives a nice focal point to the scene, and the impression is finished off by the ground texture, passing from a cobblestone floor through a circular section of the tiling into a clean glowing purple area. And if you are, like me, wondering what makes the little purple gaps between the “stones” of the circle, Aaron has revealed the secret: purple quarter-circle roller coaster tracks!

Dare you face the giant lord in his Profaned Capital?

One of the more interesting video games in terms of story recently has been the Dark Souls series with its subtle lore. Revan New has created this visually impressive diorama of the Profaned Capital from Dark Souls 3 with hardly any description, save for it being inspired by said videogame. With imposing pillars and arches set in a rocky environment, this is definetely one of the most memorable areas of the game.

Profaned Capital

See Yhorm the Giant upon his dark throne

A new kind of old temple in the new world

Mesoamerican temples lend themselves naturally to LEGO, with their blocky shapes and colours that are often abundant in collections, namely grays and greens. There seems to be an influx of Mayan and Aztec temples lately as you might have noticed on The Brothers Brick, and we have the Summer Joust competition to thank for this. One of the creations built for this contest is this one by Andreas Lenander

Temple of the serpent - summer joust 2018 - front left side

The first thing that catches our attention is the dark tan ground, a change from the expected greens that are used in similar creations. While I like the contrast that green gives, tan is probably more realistic. The sand and olive green overgrowth on the temple is an interesting colour choice, joined by dark green, which looks almost black in the photo. This darker colour gives a strong impression of wet moss, setting the scene in a particularly dank swamp. Some of the more unique parts usages include the Statue of Liberty headgear used as serpent’s head ornaments and the brown treads used as vines.

A new beauty born from a new beauty born from decay

Château Nottebohm is an abandoned mansion in Belgium, and while it may not be the only one of its kind, there has to be something special about it to inspire Marion to build it in LEGO not once, but twice! Abandoned buildings are an acquired taste, but even if we would not all agree they are beautiful, decades of disuse have granted the mansion an aura of mystery and the impression of nature reclaiming what man has taken.

Château Nottebohm.01

This amazing creation really rewards a closer look, so click here to see more!

This island marketplace has everything you want; from LEGO bricks to... LEGO bricks.

Builder John Snyder calls this creation “The Island of El Harraz,” and while I believe that this could be a part of an island, it is probably not the whole deal, considering where the camel and ostrich would go, why the denizens would have a market and what the structural integrity of medieval buildings would be on such a small sandy island. That aside, the creation is just sweet. Until a few years ago, Middle Eastern-inspired builds were rare, but lately, we’re seeing more of this established style of architecture (that is at least as deserving of attention as the classic European utilitarian military forts).

The Island of El Harraz

There is a nice composition to the whole scene, with buildings set up rising higher the further they are from the front. The colours used are simply perfect, and anyone who’s lived in or visited the areas that inspired John inspired would recognize them. This is all topped off by vivid minifigure action staged throughout the diorama, such as the ostrich looking on from the side with a surprising amount of character.