Tag Archives: Post-Apoc

It’s right on the tip of my tongue, too!

When I first saw this post-apocalyptic build by SweStar one little word came to mind but, wouldn’t you know, I plum forgot it just as I was about to mention it. It’s a little one syllable nonsense word. Gosh darn it, the ol’ noggin isn’t what it used to be! Let’s see, there is a rather leggy mech, a black cat, a garbage can on fire and a mysterious figure with a papoose but none of that is helpful, really. I swear, I’d forget the nose on my face if it wasn’t right in front of me! Sometimes I walk into a room and forget why I did it. Has that ever happened to you? What the heck was the little word I was thinking of? Oh, well. With my luck, It’ll probably come to me just as I’m falling asleep. I hate it when that happens!

BIP

Halloween Zombie Freak-Out 2019!

What are your Halloween plans? Mine are to buy a bag of candy for trick-or-treaters, stay in and watch a few schlock horror flicks, but leave the lights out in hopes trick-or-treaters won’t actually come so as to have all the delicious candy for myself. What? Don’t judge. I like schlock horror flicks. It would seem Pieter Dennison has some schlock Halloween plans of his own that involve surviving the inevitable zombie apocalypse. Shipping containers make great zombie deterrents (right up until they learn to climb) and a rickety ladder serves as optimum transport between the two of them. I can’t see how that can go badly. Cattails (nature’s corndogs) populate the center area while the power lines in the background are an excellent touch. If this layout was a movie, I’d totally watch it with a bag of candy. Trick-or-treaters be damned!

halloween 2019

Apocalypse build makes use of “shattered” bricks

“The End” clearly isn’t the end of fantastic LEGO creations in this post-apocalyptic build by SweStar. Using more than 50 round tiles as roadway, dozens of clear slopes and a random assortment of brick debris, SweStar is able to pull of the look of mankind’s dreary future. I found the use of slopes as broken windows to be very insightful and realistic. The red truck frame also stuck out due to it being one of the oldest LEGO accessories in this build, a literal relic from another time.

Brothers Brick

Safety, practicality, and dignified luxury mean nothing when raising hell

Many prefer the safety, practicality and reliability of a Toyota while driving to work. Others find that the versatile design and all-wheel drive of a Subaru speaks to their rugged sensibilities while exploring the great outdoors. Some, with greater means, may enjoy the sense of  dignified luxury that a Lexus can provide. Chris Perron’s Gyrobike, on the other hand, is none of these.

Gyrobike

Because when your name is Buzzsaw and you’re sporting a post-apocalyptic mohawk, you ain’t got time for dignified luxury, Jack! You’re all about rippin’ the road and raisin’ hell! Based on the wild concept designs of artist Calum Alexander Watt, this beast, like the Subaru,  is also all-wheel drive. Meaning…it is all wheel and not much else. Can it pick up the kiddos from school? Sorry, rugrats, get your own damn ride! Can it get groceries at the local supermarket? Heck no! This Gyrobike is designed for crushing groceries! And heads, probably.

Everything is awesome when I turn my music up

Apocalypse is never a valid reason to stop enjoying your favourite tunes. Look at Emmet who keeps his chin up when the world around has almost been destroyed. British LEGO fan and builder justin_m_winn peeks inside Emmet’s hideout equipped with high-end stereo. This two-layers vignette has a lot of details smoothly mixed together. A room like this would fit somewhere inside 70840 Welcome To Apocalypseburg set; just imagine Emmet shaking up all of his neighbours with Everything is Awesome!

Awesome Remix Emmet - At The Decks

Emmet isn’t alone in keeping his chin up during the impending LEGO apocalypse. Justin has also built “Apocalypse Benny” (with his robotic arm) a wonderful display vignette, using super-rare pieces from original Classic Space sets.

Apocalypse Benny - Space Repair

The future is bright, colourful and apocalyptic

Maybe it’s the light blue water or maybe it’s the cheerfully bright photography of this LEGO creation by lokiloki29, but it looks almost like a postapocalyptic world would be quite the place to live. Minus the whole probably being dead thing.

New refuge

The overall scene looks mostly simple, combining few large monochromatic sections like the water, the grass, and the containers. The real details are hidden inside the containers and around them in the shape of a little tree, a very well made gradient of the oozing toxic waste, and a cute shelter inside the upper container.

New refuge

The Lego Movie 2’s biggest set: 70840 Welcome To Apocalypseburg [Review]

The LEGO Movie 2’s range of sets has got us excited, not least because of Classic LEGO Space astronauts in multiple colours. But what really set hearts aflutter and pulses racing here at Brothers Brick was the reveal of the massive 70840 Welcome To Apocalypseburg — a shanty town built around a fallen Statue of Liberty, apparently Emmet & Co.’s new home town in the forthcoming film.

70840 Apocalypseburg finished build and packaging

70840 Welcome To Apocalypseburg includes 3,178 pieces and 12 minifigures. The set is available now for LEGO VIPs, and is on general release February 1st, 2019 from the LEGO Shop (US $299.99 | CA $399.99 | UK £279.99).

Read our hands-on review of 70840 Welcome To Apocalypseburg

The future looks bleak, but at least the decorations are still holding strong!

It seems as though building a scene set in the year 2049 is the thing to do these days, no doubt in part because of the new Bladerunner film. However, this scene by Eddy Plu depicting Tokyo in the year 2049 has some great elements that set it apart from the crowd. Usually when building LEGO scenes, builders tend to focus on the background, and rarely is there anything in the foreground. But here, the Eddy has added some leaves and other objects to the foreground, giving the scene a higher degree of depth and making it much more interesting to admire.

Tokyo 2049 東京

Also, don’t overlook the cracked and uneven street, which makes it seem like either an explosion or an earthquake has happened in the future, and the nice curve the sidewalk and buildings situated on it seems to follow suit in looking precarious.

Moving house – post-apocalypse style

Post-Apocalypse or “ApocaLEGO” is a LEGO building theme which can see more dull brown and grey creations than the most boilerplate of steampunk. Here’s a glorious exception to the rule by Rat Dude: an imaginative take on the genre which sees enterprising survivors build a moveable dwelling out of transport containers and a truck — like some mobile version of the stacks from Ready Player One. Revelling in its central idea, this model is gloriously detailed, festooned with every likely requirement of the wasteland warrior catered for — solar power, fresh water, air con, a vegetable garden, and even an outhouse for the effective disposal of waste!

Post Apocalypse LEGO crate house

This thing is well worth a closer look, and the builder has provided some imagery of various angles. Great attention to detail on the model — just look at all the little touches that have been crammed into it. This layer upon layer of detail has created an engaging model within a building theme that usually leaves me cold. I can’t imagine a better ride in which to tour our dystopian future.

Post Apocalypse LEGO crate house

A well-stocked wasteland workshop

If Santa and his elves survived the apocalypse, they would do very well for themselves in an outpost like this, built by Tony Toy. Without a landscape to define its locale, it would be equally at home on the edge of a toxic ocean, or the top of a rugged mountain peak. Besides a number of industrial details like an abundance of pipes going here and there, a tower crane for servicing what could be a submersible, or a drone, and a machine shop for working on a well armored truck, there is a thoughtful inclusion of alternate colored plates and bricks to lend a well-weathered look to the walls. I also like the way that Tony has crafted modules with subtly curved ridges to give the outpost a stacked, cobbled together look.

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See more details of this highly detailed post-apocalpytic workshop

A cold cellar in a hot desert

Either I was more exposed to post-apocalyptic LEGO creations or they were actually more common back when I joined the LEGO community nearly a decade ago, but this theme always brings back memories of immersive scenes filled with danger and adventure. Zombies, bunkers, bullet holes and toxic waste — what else does one need? The seemingly simple theme actually hides limitless potential — if the whole world went down, there are a lot of locations to build, and James Libby chose to show us a desert.

Cement Oasis

The main feature of the scene is the cutout showing an underground survival bunker including some utilitarian furniture, and of course weapons. The top has some nice details too, the best and the most subtle one being the little wall around the trap door, which has just the slightest tilt to it. What I like the most though is the tan border. The texture adds depth, while the stylish cutout and the skeleton “buried” in the sand create an atmosphere reminiscent of a comic panel.

Maschinen Krieger “CAMEL” walker stomps onto the post-apocalyptic battlefield

Every October, LEGO builders assemble their bricks for Ma.Ktober, a build challenge inspired by the 1980’s Japanese plastic models Maschinen Krieger. Chris Perron‘s contribution this year combines an old-style Dewback body with a bubble canopy and some rather ingenious parts usage for greebly bits on its legs, including crutches as struts. The sponson-mounted cannons are also an excellent touch.

CAMEL