Tag Archives: Post-Apoc

The cold relentless circling of the intestate earth

A man built a thing. He had a name, in those long-before times when salmon ran in the streams like silver clouds in the moonlight and people went about their business in great cities gleaming with glass as yet unmelted by fires from the sky. His name was Patrick B. The thing he built was built from bricks and told a story. A story about a man and his child a boy. That story was first told by a man named Cormac McCarthy in a book called The Road. A book is a thing made of trees but you cant eat it like you can bark and leaves and the little stems that try to push their way toward the darkened sky at the end of the months of snow. This thing this story these bricks by the man Patrick show the man and the boy as they walk long miles along long roads to the sea. It is a thing to behold. A thing you cant look away from.

The Road

Surviving the apocalypse is all about a well-provisioned outpost

When it comes to post-apocalyptic LEGO creations, there is a vast selection of sub-genres that builders are inspired by, from cyber-punk, to wasteland survival, to monster/zombie/alien-infested worlds… and so many more. This scene by LegoFin. is set in a world where massive flooding and pollution have forced survivors to carve out a life among the crumbling remains of cities.

CyberPunk 2046: Shells of Society

Aside from some very well-textured and very broken walls, I especially like the use of black bars throughout the structure for re-bar. This creates an even greater sense of danger and hostility in the environment. One missable detail is that the entire outpost is supported by a few small supports precariously balanced over the water. Then there’s all those utilitarian details like the radio tower, weather vane, and solar panels that complete the scene very nicely.

The last resort in building

Whatever happened to Fabuland – the 1980s animal-character driven play theme from LEGO – appears to be Dutch builder Sebastiaan Artsraison d’être in creating his last habitat in the world. In one of the strangest takes on the post-apocalyptic theme, the various animal-headed Fabuland characters have holed up in the Last Resort, a towering orange residential complex.

The Last Place on Earth 1

See more of this LEGO Space / Fabuland mashup

This survivor of the apocalypse is not clowning around

Creating a street scene with real character is all about the details – big and small. And when it comes to post-apocalyptic scenes, like this street scene by Jan T. the best details are in the destruction and erosion of man-made structures as nature re-claims what is hers. I’m not sure how I feel about the clown. Either it would freak the heck out of me if I were to encounter him on the street, or it would bring a smile to my face, and we would share a laugh as we scrounged for supplies.

Nuke York

There are so many great parts used in this scene and one of my favorites is the use of the twisty stem surrounding the large leaf plant part that most of us just throw away. You can find these used as vines flowing in and out of the buildings. Then there is the mini-fig back brackets used to create a lovely architectural detail above the door on the left building. The broken walls and windows are also quite nice.

Living the dystopian dream

Ah, to get away from it all — just pack up your trailer and head out of town. Well, according to LegoFin in 2046 you might just end up living in one of these dystopian suburbs. A collage of jumbled junk, all of course expertly built, from the resourceful layering of dishes to create the defunct electrical transformers, to the lovingly detailed generator out back.

CyberPunk 2046: Trailer Life

The caravan’s design uses some cleverly arranged slopes, giving it its distinctive shape; a real home from home, it’s got everything you need… well, alright it has a bucket. Still, if you do get lonely, there’s always that suspicious-looking drone to keep you company.

Fort Knowhere, a cozy spot to live out the end of civilization

Who doesn’t love a good post-apocalyptic scene? This outpost by Sebastian Bachórzewski has pretty much anything a gang of war-hardened survivors could want or need to hunker down and weather the storm. Personally, this fenced compound reminded me of the Road Warrior, with its eclectic mix of barriers, ramshackle buildings, and broken vehicles. One of my favorite features is the use of so many minifig hands to top the fence.

Fort Knowhere

This alternate view shows off some more great details.

Fort Knowhere

In a world without trains....

The post-apocalyptic world of Robert Maier has not been kind to the world of trains. Scarce resources have given to overgrowth and decay, with the former railway line now serving as a trail for weary explorers. Maier’s traveler had best watch out for trouble because trails also provide opportunity for predatory thieves. The major post-apoc elements are here: drab & weathered-looking colors, pock-marked masonry, plant overgrowth reclaiming the land, and even a super-mean looking chainsaw-wielding thug with a mohawk. Approach with extreme caution!

Journey through the wastelands (Age30)

Post-apocalyptic school of hard knocks.

This ain’t no Hogwarts. This broken down school by Jonas Obermaier has been turned into a base of operations for a nefarious gang of survivors of the End. In addition to the well-textured vegetation running wild on the grounds, there are some very nice architectural details not to be missed. Take the Dobby heads on either side of the lion head below the roof, for example. Also, a number of micro-figures in tan are a nice touch along the rooftop.

Abandoned School

Gold-toothed king of the wasteland

For people well immersed in the online LEGO community, Mark Erickson is one of the best and most influential castle builders out there. In recent times, he has branched out into other themes more often and one such occasion is with this apocalyptic roadster. It is not a direct recreation of a vehicle from a Mad Max movie, but the inspiration is all over it.

Apocalyptic Roadster.

Getting the obvious part out of the way, the huge back wheels are amazing and by far the best part of the build, but there is so much more to see, so here are some more points of interest: the flames bursting from the engine give an incredible sense of movement and the engine itself is very well built. There are some more subtle segments as well, but I feel like they add a lot to bring the build together – the colour choice for the black windscreen is important, many people would have tried to make it clear, which would just not look as good. The most subtle, yet most characteristic part in my opinion, is the little golden spike amongst silver ones at the front. Like a gold tooth in a postapocalyptic survivor’s grin.

Advertising the derelict remnants of a city street

Broken windows, damaged buildings, garbage on the street and infrastructure destroyed are some of the tell-tale signs of a post-apocolyptic world. There’s ample of opportunity to see some post-apocolyptic decay in this fantastic diorama by W. Navarre that centres around a couple of office buildings in what used to be part of a city and descends into an underground world of “every man for himself.” The Chima game card works surprisingly well as an advertising sign, and the collapsed sign with the Nike logo has seen better days. I particularly like the subterranean part of the build; it’s like an underground car park that has been repurposed, and there’s plenty of pipes, wires and drains to catch your eye.

3012 - Decades Afterwards (As Captured by the Camera)

There’s a lot to admire in this closer view of the rear portion teased in the image above.  Click to see an edited version full of special effects

A monument to the old world

There is a strange beauty in decaying industrial architecture, with chipping paint, broken metal supports and collapsing concrete walls everywhere. Or maybe I am just nostalgic for apocalyptic LEGO creations that used to be all the rage when I discovered the online community. Whichever is the case, Exetrius has hit the nail on the head for me with this ruined communication tower.

Ruined Communication Tower - mainCommunication tower

Sand green is the perfect colour to make a creation like this, and combined with dark gray and limited splashes of colour it makes for a beautifully bleak colour scheme. This is further facilitated by great textures of disuse and weathering. The tower is 120 cenimeters tall (47 in.), a task made easy by using train tracks for its main segment. Everybody who uses train tracks in unique ways is awesome!

Communication tower

What’s not to love about a post-apocalyptic toxic wasteland?

Bleecker Street never looked so bleak in this delightfully dreary scene built by Sanel Lukovic, part of a collaborative build presented at Bricking Bavaria in Munich with friends Robert Maier and Jonas Obermaier. Simply titled Apoca, it has a lovely rustic, decaying motif. Broken windows throughout the dilapidated building contrast with the charming copper oxide green Vespa, while overgrown weeds and cluttered wreckage cover cracks in the pavement. And nothing screams post-apocalyptic like respiratory equipment being worn by the armed and dangerous-looking dudes surveying the badlands.

Apoca