Tag Archives: Mecha

We all love a good LEGO Gundam or Macross mecha, but LEGO builders everywhere are also creating excellent models of their own designs. Have a look at them here.

I, for one, welcome our robotic lemur overlords

We have a complicated relationship with lemurs here at Brothers Brick. On one hand, they’re cute, cuddly, and good at fishing LEGO bricks from down the back of the couch. But on the other hand, they’re messy, nibble on our server power cables, and smell a bit. Maybe we should look to replace our lemur with one of Mitsuru Nikaido‘s mechanical versions?

LEGO Mecha Ring-tailed lemur-01

This is a great model — natural curves and shaping, with lots of cool functional-looking robotic greeble stuff going on under the smooth plating. Nice use of a hot air balloon plate piece as the lemur’s back — a lovely sinuous curve. And that tail — magic.

Beware the might of my labelled sword: Brandenburger Tor!

Slicing and dicing with a sword bearing the name Brandenburger Tor, this mech by
zi zy looks ready to fight (and win) against anything that crosses its path. I like the character that the builder has managed to incorporate into this build. Its stout appendages, flat head that’s barely there, and aggressive stance give the mech a threatening appearance.

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I particularly appreciate the use of a single lime part (a round stud) as the “eyes” of the mech, as it completes the appearance of the mech with a small drop of color.

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Bwahaha. Soon I will rule this world

Your mileage may vary when it comes to LEGO’s Bionicle-style “constraction” figures. However, even the most militant “bricks-or-nothing” builders should recognise excellent construction skills, regardless of where some of the parts come from. Kelvin Low has simply smashed it with this stunning large-scale Skull Knight figure.

skull knight02

Kelvin has made smart choices with the large armour pieces — couple those with some beautiful greebling details between the plates, and a stylish splash of colour in the cape’s trim, and you’ve got a great piece of work. I love the sense of heft and power in this model. You get the impression the Skull Knight would stomp you into dust as soon as look at you…

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Companion droid is a man’s best friend

Today we bring you not just one, but two companion droids built by GolPlaysWithLego. I like to think that a man’s best friend is WLY on the left, although the look on his owner’s face suggests he is not altogether happy with the ride. The shaping of both droids is very cool with the new curved mudguards ideal to frame the ‘face’ areas. SPD is definitely giving out arachnoid vibes with those spindly legs and seems to be the ‘protector’, being both armed and unmanned.

W.L.Y / S.P.D Droids LEGO MOC

I love WLY’s legs — ingenious use of helmets, plus a rather unusual part, namely the small armour plates from the Baze Malbus SW “constraction” figure. And did you spot the 1980’s phone speaker printed tile as the droid’s mouthpiece?

W.L.Y / S.P.D Droids LEGO MOC

These two Bionicles are not identical

This is one of my creations that has been waiting for a few months to be uploaded, for many irrelevant reasons. I think this one takes a bit of insight to be appreciated fully. While my build (on the left) is a servicable mechanical build on its own, its true strengths can only be appreciated if compared to the original LEGO Bionicle 8532 Onua set on the right, as this is a piece-by-piece LEGO System recreation of the classic first generation Toa Onua set. My version is completely unstable and unplayable, but visually comes close enough to the official version that it passes my personal quality standard.

Toa Onua side-by-side comparison

This was a somewhat quick build, but I was so inspired by the idea that it completely took over my life for a few days. It strikes me that Bionicle (or as the cool kids call it these days, “bonkle”) is quite similar to classic space in a way – while classic space is the most popular nostalgic theme for many older LEGO fans, Bionicle is the go-to nostalgia trip for ones growing up in the early 2000s, which makes it surprising how rare reproductions are. There are few even in the actual Bionicle building genre, but besides my build, I have only seen one other example of systemized Toa, but even that was just the builder taking his own spin on the concept.

Now, I have indeed built Toa Onua (because this one is the easiest to build due to wide selection of parts in both of his primary colours, black and very dark grey), and I see myself being able to build Toa Kopaka, but for any other ones my selection of parts just can not do. So here is a challenge to any builder brave enough and equipped for it: I would love to see more of the first generation Bionicle characters (or later ones?) made out of system parts!

This LEGO Zoid is much bigger than it seems

While LEGO builds based on Zoids have been done in the past, it’s still awesome to see them, especially at a large scale. This Blade Liger by d’ Qiu Brick is deceptively presented in these pictures, as it’s much bigger than the first time you glance at it. Focus on the rather large orange windscreen in the middle of the head to get a sense of scale. Yeah, this thing is huge.

Blade Liger

Individual parts usage doesn’t suffer at this huge scale, with simple but effective building going on everywhere. The segmented areas on the legs and head are really pleasing to look at, and the large blocky proportions give it that robotic feel to mix in with the clearly animal form. Make sure you spend some time on the builder’s photostream for more angles of this build.

Blade Liger

Cubo my transformo

Transformers are among the toughest things to build in LEGO. Even if it’s not the movie kind, building something that transforms into a simple cube can be nearly as challenging. However, Milan Sekiz has done just that, and the result is super cool.

Cubo

It’s common to sacrifice looks when building something functional, because there are so many limitations on which parts can be used in certain spots. But Milan has gotten the best of both worlds, making an awesome robot that can still transform into a perfect cube (plus the head and antenna).

Ladies like armor plating

Introduced to the Halo universe in Halo 4, the Mantis shook up the vehicle gameplay with a mech carrying immense firepower and capacity for celebratory crouching. ZiO Chao presents a LEGO version of this UNSC powerhouse in incredible detail. His accurate model is fully poseable, with flexible legs, cockpit, and armaments.

HALO Mantis standing

The minifigure-scaled mech comfortably seats a Spartan minifigure at the controls.

HALO Mantis breakdown mode

See more photos, including some progress shots, on ZiO Chao’s Flickr.

Red-hot metamorphosing Inferno

Nothing beats a Transformer with that old, classic look! Autobot Inferno has been built masterfully by Hoyin Lau, and he’s ready to transform and roll out! What screams out Transformers Generation 1 to me is the construct of the head and the deep blue eyes.

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What makes the icing on the cake for any Transformers build is the capability to morph into its alternate mode, and you’ve got to check out that screamin’ red Fire Engine. Take my money!

『劉氏重工』- Chibi Inferno

Click to see more of this awesome Transformer

Voltron: Defender of the Universe

Weekends in our house growing up included Saturday morning cartoons, so when I saw this incredible Voltron by d’ Qiu Brick I had a huge pang of nostalgia for the days when cartoons on TV weren’t always about selling cheap spinning trinkets or collectible hatching toys.

Voltron

It’s difficult to tell from the pictures, but I am pretty sure those lionized limbs transform into the robotic lions I remember growing up in the 80’s. The individual lion heads look amazing, especially the black lion with the face in the jaws. I love the seamless blending of Bionicle and System elements, the star on the belt buckle and the crested shield on his chest.

Tips for Kids – Transformers: Cool Projects for Your LEGO Bricks [Review]

Joachim Klang and Alex Jones are a duo of builders well known within the LEGO community, and their creations have appeared on The Brothers Brick numerous times. Now they’ve got a new book to share some of their techniques: Tips for Kids – Transformers: Cool Projects for Your LEGO® Bricks. Over the past few months, we’ve already highlighted a few of the builds that the pair created for the book, but now we are able to review the book itself.

TBB Transformers Review

Title: Tips for Kids: Transformers: Cool Projects for your Lego Bricks
Publisher: Heel Verlag Gmbh (July 10, 2017)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 3958434959
ISBN-13: 978-3958434950
RRP: $19.95

Continue reading

Vivid pink is the fastest colour there is

Mecha are a very popular subject among LEGO builders, but even after all these years, there are still very unique ones that pop up every now and then, most often due to new exotic pieces being released. Such is the case with this sleek racing mecha called the Running Flamingo, built by Bob DeQuatre, utilizing the relatively new balloon building pieces as armour plating.

The Running Flamingo

The build is an interesting balance of elegance and bulk, which the builder weaves into a cohesive whole. All the technical details are so realistic (as far as science fiction goes) that I can almost hear the pistons sliding and gears turning.