Tag Archives: Mecha

We all love a good LEGO Gundam or Macross mecha, but LEGO builders everywhere are also creating excellent models of their own designs. Have a look at them here.

Does this mech make my butt look big?

Intricate details are a hallmark of Marco Marozzi LEGO mech builds. This often leads to a feeling that the builds are super-huge in scale, even though they’re usually miracles of compact design. The MT3 Heavy Mech gives us a clue, though, with the quickly recognizable inclusion of a Star Wars 41st Elite Corps Trooper minifigure as the pilot. There are also hints if you happen to know how big those hockey masks are.  Or maybe you spotted those minifigure hands for fingers.

MT3 Heavy Mech

From the rear, you can see more of the custom sticker work that set Marco’s builds apart from the crowd. There are also some alternate-brand part selections here and there. LEGO purists may complain about that, but you can’t argue that the results are really stunning.

MT3 Heavy Mech

This isn’t the first mech of Marco’s that we’ve spotlighted, and it’s unlikely to be the last. My hope is that others are inspired by these tiny(?) beauties, and we’ll see even more Mechs on the horizon.

Robots with heads of rubber

Just when you think you’ve seen nearly every incarnation of LEGO robot to pass your computer screen, another master builder like Andreas Lenander shows up.

Ma.KMECHtoberFest2020 - family photo

While we’ve seen mechs before here on The Brothers Brick, we’ve never seen tires turned inside out to create a robot head. It took a few minutes staring at this build to realize that the head wasn’t a plastic brick, but was actually rubber. Everything about this scene here is fantastic, but I’m still in awe of the idea of using inside-out tires. Mind-boggling, you might say!

Big machines for little critters

Did you ever feel bad for the cute baby dragons that kept being harassed by Ragana back in the LEGO Elves theme? I did. So I built some mechs to let them defend themselves, and then (since I only had three dragons) I built an evil cat mech in the same style (I know, I know, “evil cat” is redundant…). I’ve already written about one of these mechs, but I think they look even better all together. When I started building for the fan challenge Mechtober, I half-heartedly built the small black mech. But then, as usual for me, I got excited and invested and built a larger dark grey one, followed by an equally large light grey one, and finally a white one. I have a hard time going halfway on projects, it seems.

Dragonsuits: Group Shot

The minimalist style I started with, relying on lots of bar-and-clip connections, was carried throughout, but it was interesting to find what parts were color-limited for me. For example, I do not have any bars with clip in white, which was one of the key connection points on the black and grey mechs; that meant I needed to get creative, and ended up using most of my white skeleton arms to compensate. I was especially happy with the light grey one’s cockpit, since I have always wanted to use that canopy for something besides a Ninjago spinner. Will they keep the dragons safe? I don’t know, but they’ve at least got a fighting chance now.

Guten tag, Raketenwerfer!

The Brothers Brick regular Andreas Lenander has built a LEGO Ma.K SAFS Raketenwerfer, which I’m pretty sure is German for “launching rockets in a field of olive cheese wedges”. Don’t quote me on that. But that’s pretty much what is going on here. It’s just a small part of what is in store from Andreas in October. I’ll keep an eye out for what this builder is up to and I advise you do the same. This will get you started.

Ma.K SAFS - Raketenwerfer

I’ve got the blues real bad

You’ve got to hand it to this mech for its commitment to that blue outfit. Is that how it works with mechs? They wake up one morning and sift through their wardrobe of sassy ensembles and decide…blue it is! Well, even if that’s not the way it is with mechs, you have to admire the craftsmanship of this LEGO creation by nobu_tary. Gundam fans would recognize this as the MS-07B Gouf, which I was already well aware of and definitely didn’t learn it from looking it up three minutes ago so don’t get that idea in your heads. This builder is on a roll lately with cool mechs. It turns out this mech has hundreds of friends you may want to check out, each with their own fabulous outfits.

GOUF

Moves like Jaeger

One thing that always bothers me about movies about giant metal things, be they spaceships in Star Wars or Jaegers in Pacific Rim, is how they get all that material in one place and assembled. I mean, where did Palpatine get the materials to build that giant fleet? That’s some serious mining operations! Jaegers aren’t as large as Star Destroyers, but the question remains; what factories are churning out those parts? Are they all built in one place, or are different components assembled in different factories and then shipped across the country for full assembly? To answer the question, I built a LEGO scene depicting a giant arm on a giant trailer, ready to be shipped to a shatterdome to be joined with the rest of the Jaeger body.

Jaeger Arm Transport

It was my first foray into building this sort of thing, as I typically consider myself more of a castle builder, but I was reasonably pleased with the arm itself (other builders are designing the rest of the mech, and we’ll assemble the whole thing digitally once it’s finished). It looks the part of a large robot arm, at very least. Harder was making a scene to give it scale, especially since I wanted to include a flying helicopter (and my bricks don’t fly on their own, sadly). I added an arch from a previous build, made up the truck and trailer, and included a previously built helicopter, after making some modifications to it to improve the proportions. But how to get it all in one shot? Maybe other builders are better at photo editing than I am, but it takes a long time for me to splice different photographs into one coherent picture. Four different camera shots went into the final image, in fact, making it kind of like the Jaeger, comprised of many different parts assembled at the end.

A most mysterious mechanical mollusc

The nautilus is one of those amazing creatures both strange and beautiful. With a spiral shell that seems to be a natural manifestation of the golden mean. And when interpreted by Mitsuru Nikaido, this cephalopod takes on an even more usual form, as Mitsuru builds mechanical versions of living creatures. Aside from the many curved sections, and the sprouting tentacles, my favorite detail would have to be the Hero Factory chest piece for eyes.

LEGO Mecha Nautilus Mk2-10

A moment on the lips, a lifetime on the hips

This LEGO Fatboy Mech by Marco Marozzi is decidedly rather rotund in the hip and leg area. I believe the medical term the kids used to throw around the schoolyard for this is “fatty-fatty-boombalatty”. But is this mech’s propensity toward tipping the scales a product of overeating or a glandular disorder? The stickers on this chubby chap clue us in that it may have an affinity for Red Bull and, while it is not overly fattening in itself, its high caffeine content could lead to high blood pressure and diabetes. Nasty stuff, that Red Bull but I would say such a thing as I am well north of forty. The crazy kids are into it though and by the time they get old enough to mix it with vodka you have already lost hope for them ever listening to good music. Kids these days! Am I right? Get off my lawn! Anyway, this is a rather cool mech, I admit. Cool mechs seem to be Marco’s thing.

FATBOY 2 MECH

One man’s garbage is another man’s also garbage

If you were to say we post garbage here at The Brother’s Brick you might have a couple of people agree with you. However, this time at least, we are posting garbage with this clever LEGO garbage collector built by R 194. This one has all the intrigue and charm of other garbage collectors you may have met except this one is a robot. Or possibly a person in a mech suit. I don’t know, I didn’t really think this premise through. Still, it’s the coolest thing I’ve seen in my admittedly isolated day. It would seem we are quite fascinated by such a dirty subject. What do you think?

Garbage collector

Juggling klowns from outer space!

In space, no one can hear you laugh! Or scream in terror depending on your relationship to clowns. Builder Blake Foster brings some humor to the outer reaches of the universe with this wonderful LEGO juggling clown mech. I’ve just recently begun a fascination with mechs so I’m always excited to see them come up these days. Most mechs are so very intense so it’s always refreshing when they don’t take themselves too seriously. This one balances that seriousness and humor perfectly with its nicely detailed grey skeleton and additional primary color accouterments. I love the rounded fingertips that mimic oversized clown gloves and the little bow tie is a hilarious addition. The 50’s style bubble helmet is the perfect topper, filled to the brim with the curly green clown wig.

Spaceclowns: Jugglebot

But that’s not all! This is just a smaller part of a much larger model.

Read on to see the rest!

Make no bones about it

LEGO builder Mitsuru Nikaido is back with another one of his animal mechs and this time he’s left off the protective exoskeleton. Instead, you have a fish that has a…regular skeleton. This fishy mech follows the same white and gray color scheme that his other animal mechs have so it makes for a great new addition to the line. As always, Mitsuru has demonstrated some very nice parts usage. I’m particularly fond of the repeated use of these handlebars along its backbone. I advise you clear your schedule, settle in, and check out these mechs by Mitsuru and others.

LEGO-Mecha-Skeleton-fish-05

You mess with the bull, you get the horns!

Brothers Brick regular Aido K. has built a LEGO mechanical bull but not the kind you ride at your local whiskey bar. In fact, you’d probably want to steer clear of this one. (See what I did there?) Aido has taken an animal that is chock full of rage, muscle and testosterone and mechanized it because apparently that’s what the world needs. All kidding aside, this creation is as magnificent as the real beast. The posturing, the horns, even the flared nostrils are a sight to behold. LEGO chains add texturing to the underbelly and I spy a few tires used in creative ways. My favorite part has got to be the tail comprised of feathered wings. The light brick illuminating the eyes is an added touch of brilliance. This bull joins a long line of mechanized animals we’ve enjoyed featuring over the years.

Bull