Tag Archives: Mecha

We all love a good LEGO Gundam or Macross mecha, but LEGO builders everywhere are also creating excellent models of their own designs. Have a look at them here.

Harvesting the ocean’s riches

In the year 2018, Aquasharks is not a word that would turn many heads apart from the occasional hardcore adult LEGO fan. For the younger crowd, Aquasharks is an underwater LEGO theme from the 90’s that had some imaginative set designs and play features like magnets (which, admittedly, were everywhere back then). As opposed to some other themes from the same years, this particular one doesn’t seem to get much love from the online LEGO community, but luckily Jonas Obermaier is here to give it five minutes of glory… perhaps this time we won’t forget about it again?

Aquasharks Deep Sea Juggernaut

The build is technically a hardsuit, but the heavy use of minifig parts (the core of the top half is based on the Aquasharks SCUBA gear) blurs the line between a heavily modified minifig and a compact mecha. With the builder’s skills in minifig design, this is hardly surprising. All sorts of small colourful parts capture the motif of the Aquasharks prints, and with enough imagination, the dark blue minifig hand in the center of the torso could look like a shark symbol!

LEGO Bumblebee buzzes his way into your heart

There have been many Transformers movies released over the last decade, and many LEGO Transformers have been featured here at TBB, some that actually transform, and some that are so detailed they boggle the mind. With the upcoming release of Bumblebee, this highly detailed model by ekownimako closely resembles its on-screen inspiration. From the gently curving eyebrows fashioned from the flexible stretcher harness to the handlebar parts that form the separated front fender.

Check out some of the many other Transformers LEGO creations we have featured recently.

Bumblebee bot is a tasty Transformer

We’ve seen our fair share of LEGO Transformers models (notably the collection of brick-built robots by Alex Jones and Joachim Klang). But here’s a smart little version of Bumblebee in his Camaro iteration by Jerry Builds Bricks. The model is a neat design — not only does the car look sleek and smooth, it transforms into the robot without the addition of any more parts. I particularly like the use of the textured Technic part for Bumblebee’s face — it adds a level of detail beyond what you might expect at this scale.

Transformers Camaro

Epic 4-scene collaboration by Shobrick and Cole Blaq, plus an exclusive look behind the scene [Feature]

LEGO TOKYO is a special collaboration between Aurélien Mathieu (better known online as Shobrick) and Cole Blaq. To be precise, it’s really Shobrick’s swan song from the LEGO scene–and what better way to make a grand exit but with a monumental partnership to release four epic scenes that were put together by professional set designers and talented artists.

Click to see the duo’s amazing images of LEGO Tokyo and read about how they were created

One jellyfish that is not quite as squishy

There is no doubt that Moko is one of the best and most prolific LEGO mecha builders out there and this week he brings us a unique tentacle monster, which is also a robot! And it transforms!

MFS-021 Chironex

Both forms of the mech manage to look perfect and menacing. Transforming creations often have to make compromises in one or both of their forms, but this one seems like the bricks were just made for it. The rich purple and translucent purple really make for an evil look and the splashes of blue on some tentacles help break it up a little and add a nice contrast. The dome is obviously the centerpiece of the build, but I also really like the grill tiles used on the inside of the tentacles as visible on the humanoid form, as they help to add a flowing look.

MFS-021 Chironex

The mean green quadrupedal mecha machine

If I were a minifigure, I would be fast to jump out of the way of this LEGO mech by Markus Rollbühler. Markus drew his inspiration from a plastic model kit by Industria Mechanika. Markus carried over several characteristics from the kit while still remaining distinct and original with his design. For being a static model, I’m particularly impressed by how mechanical the finished build feels. In the mid-section, inverted plates expose the pins underneath in such a way that is reminiscent of rivets. Dark and light gray elements are mixed together to great effect, giving off the impression of working hydraulics. Other fun details include the driver’s outstretched legs and rolled fabrics, which could represent sleeping bags and/or tents. Meanwhile, the olive green color is a welcome bonus.

TR-47 Krabbeltier

Maschinen Krieger “CAMEL” walker stomps onto the post-apocalyptic battlefield

Every October, LEGO builders assemble their bricks for Ma.Ktober, a build challenge inspired by the 1980’s Japanese plastic models Maschinen Krieger. Chris Perron‘s contribution this year combines an old-style Dewback body with a bubble canopy and some rather ingenious parts usage for greebly bits on its legs, including crutches as struts. The sponson-mounted cannons are also an excellent touch.

CAMEL

Mechanical master of the arena

Gladiators had to face all manners of dangers in the arena, but as Mitsuru Nikaido shows, sometimes the gladiator is scarier than any beast that could be pitted against it, and the builder has made quite a few, many of which featured on the Brothers Brick.

LEGO Robot Mk16-01TT

Nothing says “dangerous” like black and yellow stripes, showing which parts of the mech should be avoided–which here is basically all of them. The builder uses lots of new elements to achieve very flowing shapes of the armour, as well as intensely detailed mechanical parts. The best part use is probably the sword, made out of a helicopter rotor blade.

Obey the monolith, slave people of Earth!

From the hands of our otherworldly overlord Rat Dude comes a glorious machine to see our every movement and feel our every emotion, so that we can serve our master with utmost efficiency. Love the Monolith. Trust the monolith. Thought of rebellion is punished by immediate execution.

The builder says that the Monolith’s four mechanical legs each think independently and work together to overcome any terrain and its organic tentacles can feel slaves’ emotions. The sharp angle of the main body reminds its followers of the Monolith’s sharp wit and its white colour of the purity of its purpose–justice. Not only does the glorious Rat Dude bring us a sight of the Monolith, but he even graces us with every aspect of its magnificent construction.

An absolute unit of a mech

There are mechs designed to transport cargo, to build new worlds, to race against each other, to save lives… And then there’s the Thunderbolt — designed, well, to destroy. The builder of this titan, Japanese mecha master Moko, made sure every tiniest piece of the mech’s design forebodes its foe’s fast, yet painful death.

Thunderbolt

But, of course, it’s not the mech’s color that gave it its name. The real show starts once the yellow bracers come open and everything around is illuminated with stunning lightning effects. This is when you notice old LEGO Technic 9V wired connectors running along the mech’s forearms; what a brilliant example of functional elements doubling as decorations.

Thunderbolt

Colossal Gundam made with over 10,000 LEGO pieces and stands 3 feet tall

When LEGO artist Henry Pinto dreams of a project being envisioned, its always going to be a thrill and it never disappoints. Looking at it brings chills down our spine with the exceptionally detailed and accurate modelling of the Gundam RX78-02 from Mobile Suit Gundam: The Origin. Fans of mecha surely buckle at their knees seeing this amazing mecha coming to life in LEGO. Thanks to Henry, we have exclusive never before seen photos of this amazing build in all its glory.

The RX78-02 stands 90cm tall (over 35 inches) and is made up of over 10,000 LEGO elements weighing around 10kg (22 lbs). Henry started building this back in May and recently completed in September – a total of 5 months and late nights, lunch breaks, and with constant tweaking to perfection. What makes it also outstanding is how it’s void of the typical LEGO studs that give it a clean and smooth finishing, never giving a hint that it was made with LEGO elements in the first place. 

Click to see more of the incredible Gundam

This LEGO mech is one serious predator

Every now and then a LEGO model comes along that instantly captures your attention. This crocodile-inspired heavy mech by Marco Marozzi did that for me. Between the color choices, custom details like the camouflage, and well-placed stickers, its dynamic pose, and some truly inspired part usage, this mech is the real deal. To begin with, I don’t think I have ever seen a more perfect use for the molded chassis from the Legends of Chima Speedorz used here for the mech’s upper leg.

FCA AHM 4th Heavy Mech

Also, the coiled bullwhip usually featured on pirate ships sets, which is used throughout the model for wiring, and possible hydraulics. This mech does not even need any kind of gun or rocket. It can simply tear its opponents limb from limb.

FCA AHM 4th Heavy Mech