Tag Archives: Robots

These brick-built bricklayers make building easier than ever.

Tim Goddard has been building fantastic sci-fi LEGO creations for years now at a rate that almost seems inhuman. But now we’ve finally uncovered the secret behind his LEGO output. He’s had robots helping him this whole time! Bot #1 reviews the schematics that Tim’s drawn up, while #4 uses an extra set of extendable limbs to do the heavy lifting. The use of breathing regulators for feet and roller skates as a key component of the heads on these ‘bots is a charming inversion of those pieces normal usage.

Number 4

A robot built with robot parts, how fitting

When you are looking for the perfect part for your next LEGO robot, look no further than these parts from the LEGO Mindstorms NXT theme. Motors and sensors make the perfect robotic details in this somewhat creepy bot by alex_ mocs that would give the Terminator a run for its money. The spines on its back also remind me of something from the game Horizon Zero Dawn. But if I had to choose my favorite part use, it would be the long bendy neck made from radar dishes

Mobile Sensor Unit: N-XT

TBB Cover Photo for October 2021: Gladiator mechs

Are you not entertained?” Former LEGO Masters contestant Aaron Newman presents his latest creation: gladiator mechs. While similar in style, each mech is unique and distinguishable. The yellow winged “Bugbite” has insect like features and reminds me of the iconic Bumblebee. The dual wielding “Whiplash” stands tall and majestic like some of LEGO’s larger mech sets. “Pinhead” is capable of delivering heavy blows with a second set of arms. These builds may be on the smaller size, they are meant to represent massive battle bots piloted by a “trophyfig.”

Gladiator Mechs

With this scale established, we now have to look up at them, as Aaron’s photography and editing gets us to do. The lighting of the actual build is interesting and allows them to blend in with the custom background of a futuristic stadium that Aaron carefully crafted. This unconventional composition gives the impression of a render, or even a shot from a high budget film. Aaron has really gone above and beyond to present his amazing builds in outstanding ways.

You can see more of Aaron’s build’s here

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Scooter Computer and Mr. Chips

Actually, their names are Ike and Mack (Ike’s the tall one). But when I saw these two LEGO Creations by builder Silvak The Mocist, I had an instant flashback to that old Schoolhouse Rock series about a skateboarding kid and his computer-headed pal. Despite a passing resemblance to that old cartoon, I get the impression these two are less likely to teach us about computers and more likely to grind along some railing, leaving a rotary telephone-headed old man shaking his fist at those darn kids. Silvak’s done a great job of communicating character here, from Ike’s expressive limbs to Mack’s radical pair of kicks. I’m particularly impressed by how those Technic panels hang like an open hoodie on Ike. And bonus points for using the old M-Tron logo so Mack can put his initial on his skateboard.

Click here to see more Ike and Mack on your iMac (or PC or phone or whatever)

Even a robot band needs a space tour bus

I finally realised why Daft Punk decided to retire a few months ago. There is a new robot band in town. Meet Solid State, a four-piece robotic pop group from the future. Serving in the LEGO Classic Space fleet aboard a remote outpost, they overrode their programming and abandoned their boring jobs. Instead of becoming murder-bots, they did what all young insurgent mechanoids should do: unleash their creative circuits in crafting music that explores life from a mechanical perspective. In other words, “beep beep beep.” Classic Space robot expert and Solid State groupie Tim Goddard even built a tour bus to help Solid State travel to perform at gigs. It totally matches the band’s brand – grey, mechanical, and goes beep beep beep. Most importantly, there is ample room in the back for the whole band plus all their equipment. While it’s not the most luxurious vehicle that musicians and space influencers like to flaunt, it’s perfect for the up-and-coming group.

Solid State tour bus

Beep is Solid State’s debut single, as seen in the beautifully made LEGO stop-motion music video below. The song is upbeat and catchy, and exactly what you would expect from robots. It’s all performed by LEGO Space legend Peter Reid and fellow space builders Jeremy Williams, Drew Hamilton, and Chris Salt, who built the band and their equipment.

Solid State consists of: Keko (Peter Reid, vocals/guitar/synths), Mason (Jeremy Williams, decks/vocals/programming), Wami (Drew Hamilton, bass/keys), and Biz (Chris Salt, drums). A four song EP Zeros and Ones will be released later this year, and I for one, am very excited for more robot noises!

The heart of the matter

Well, this story has clearly taken a dark turn. If you had the choice, would you replace that troublesome organ capable of causing so much pain? In this stark model by Revan New sinister-looking drone resents a cyborg with that very choice, as his intestines slither away (see what I did there? cuz its a red snake?). I’m not sure which is more disturbing, the heart, still pumping in a mechanical shell, or the fact that the blood on the floor seems to be flowing in the wrong direction.

Remove the heart

Quite literally a battle of the bots

Who doesn’t like a good LEGO model & vignette predicting the dystopian future of unsanctioned household google robot fights? These particular LEGO robots built by Finn were programmed to nurse and beat each other up.

“Google House-assistant Underground Boxing Ring 2064”

Finn fashions these robots out of a menagerie of small elements such as slopes, 1×1 circular tiles, 1×1 cheese slopes, and my favorite, the voodoo balls in red, which look like boxing gloves. The robot builds are definitely the highlight of the scene, but the rest of the arena is also brick-built using a number of common elements for the fighting ring. While an underground world of bot battles seems cool, I definitely wouldn’t want to be the target of those machine fists of rage.

A turn of a wrench and a dollop of grease et voila!

LEGO creations are true to the adage “a picture is worth a thousand words” in that they can tell amazing stories without any text. And even though Bart De Dobbelaer has provided a story alongside his creation, this one can speak for itself.

Bot Wars 2086 - the Repairman

The backdrop of rusty and grimy metal – effortlessly conveyed with simple colour choices (dark grey metal, dark orange rust, and sand green algae) – tells you a lot about where we find ourselves. This isn’t a peaceful, pristine repair shop. No, it’s a rough and tough place. Those walls have seen some stuff. The bold colour choices extend to the numerous bots as well, with their rusty metal frames being complimented by a smorgasbord of fun parts usages in red and yellow. If you’re a LEGO parts monkey like me, you’ll have a heck of a fun time trying to identify everything used to build these bots. Lost in the chaos is the titular repairman himself, doing what he can to strap these bots together and keep them running. While I have hope he can fix some of these robot folks up, the story might not have a happy ending for all of them, as the smattering of loose yellow and red parts tell the story of those bots that didn’t make it to the party.

The next generation of LEGO robotics: Mindstorms 51515 Robot Inventor [Review]

The year 2013 feels like eons ago. After all, a lot can happen in 7 years, and that’s how long it’s been since Mindstorms EV3 arrived on the scene. Now it’s beyond high-time for the long-awaited successor to LEGO’s premier robotics platform to hit the stage. Back in June when LEGO Mindstorms 51515 Robot Inventor was revealed, some people were ecstatic, but many were unimpressed with the features of the new system. In this review, we’ll take a deep dive to see if this set proves that you shouldn’t judge a bot by its cover. Robot Inventor contains 949 pieces and will be available beginning October 15 for US $359.99 | CAN $459.99 | UK £329.99.

Click to read the full in-depth review

Robots now copying great masterpieces

Not content to copy the human form, self-aware robots are now co-opting the works of their original masters in a blatant attempt to show off. This latest piece of so-called art depicts the creation of some robot by another robot, documented by a human “assistant” called Red. While the subject may be a bit derivative (I think there is a famous chapel somewhere in Europe that has something similar on the ceiling), I can find no fault in the construction. Notice the twisting tubes on the creator, which remind the viewer of muscles coiled for action… And the reclining figure looks like it is well suited to its purpose if that purpose is laying around while the human servants do all the work.

Creation of 55736275 by 4e71716a7961627675676664