Tag Archives: Robot

Robo Maid 2031 cleans up so you don’t have to

You know that guilty feeling you get when others are working hard while you’re doing jack nothing? It’s a guilt so deep you have to take your goofing off elsewhere lest someone ask you to get off your lazy keister and help. Do you know what I mean? No? Am I the only one? Anyway, Cecilie Fritzvold has built a LEGO robot maid programmed to clean up your crap so you don’t have to. You don’t even have to hide the fact that you’re surfing the net for hilarious youtube videos when this awesome bot toils away because apparently they have no feelings. According to youtube research I did just now you can even kick robots and they won’t even feel it. I’m pretty sure that will never backfire so give it a try next time you see a robot. That plant, feather duster and coffee table are all super fabulous! So are Cecilie’s other builds in our archives.

Robo Maid 2031

Getting a leg up on the enemy

LEGO builder Marius Herrmann has been on a quest to design what he calls “Fashion Robots,” that is, cool LEGO mechs and robots that employ some of LEGO’s most unusual elements, the cloth apparel items that show up from time to time in official sets, most prominently the Scala and Belville themes from the 90s and early 2000s. We’ve covered quite a few of these excellent Fashion Robots already, and this one marks Marius’ ninth with a cool dark tan color scheme. It employs Scala pants as the coverings for its four legs, but it’s actually the rest of the design that has me interested.

Sentry “Peucaea” 10E-R

The silver ingots make great durable armor cladding on the legs, while the molded-in speakers from the boomboxes are perfect grilled covers for a missile launcher. A variety of dark tan curved slopes and arches make an interesting body, while the mech is topped with a three-barrel Gatling that’s strapped together with stretched rubber tires and a set of Tauntaun reins.

“Honey, where are my pants?”

The title was used in both LEGO movies and references an entire series that entertained the citizens of Bricksburg about a guy who is perpetually perplexed about the whereabouts of his pants. This “Piranga” Heavy Artillery 53-R bot is most definitely wearing a pair of red Scala pants but not in the most obvious way. It has an extra set of arms at the waist and the pants are acting as sleeves! This bot also makes use of two LEGO gel pens as guns. It just goes to show that talented builders like Marius Herrmann can make use of even the most “useless” of pieces. This is part of a series of fashion-forward robots he’s been building. We’ve been following them closely and I suggest you sashay over to the Brothers Brick runway to check out more of these fashionable robots.

“Piranga” Heavy Artillery 53-R

This robot is just Galador-able

LEGO’s long lost Galidor theme wasn’t everyone’s cup of tea, but there’s no denying that those unusual parts can lead to some expressive creations. Matt Goldberg gives us a stellar example with Gage “An AI of boundless curiosity, sparked by an inexplicable lightning incident.” Gage isn’t only a Galador remix, though. There are elements here from other classic LEGO themes. Check out the Aquazone pincers for hands, and that Bionicle mask for the back of Gage’s head. Throw in some “new” parts like those transparent pink 1×1 round tiles for eyes and a minifigure ice skate for a nose, and you’re ready to party!

Gage

Matt has made more photos of Gage available in a Flickr album, showing off Gage’s range of motion and emotion. And when you’re done checking those images out, you can peruse more quality robots from other builders in our archives!

This Techno Samurai is dressed to impress

LEGO’s big cloth pieces are certainly among the odder bits to use in a creation, and it’s always interesting seeing how clever builders can incorporate them. Marius Herrmann says that the cloth was indeed the inspiration behind this techno samurai robot, which uses the cape from the large buildable Chirrut Îmwe figure from Star Wars. Although Marius says the design was cheekily a ploy to see how little LEGO building they could get away with, the exposed arms and head are nevertheless quite fantastic, with a great mix of elements. Altogether, it reminds me of something that Arasaka would have built in Cyberpunk 2077.

B1-"Agelaius" Dueler

We could all use more capes around here

You could say LEGO builder Marius Herrmann is having the best month ever. Earlier I raved about a Police Enforcer bot in a fashionable blue jacket. Then my colleague “Mr. Waffles” picked up a scoop about a flying bot in a sweet pair of Scala pants. Now I’m here again and this time Marius presents a 51L “Elanoides”-NC Enforcer adorned in a ragged cape. What can I say? I’m a fan of all these fashion-forward bots. It doesn’t hurt that the build techniques here and photography are on a whole ‘nother level.

51L  "Elanoides"-NC Enforcer

Why don’t you build something cool that’ll attract our attention? That’s how this all works, you know. You build something neat, we feature it, and the world turns. Shampoo, rinse, repeat. It just seems that Marius shampoos and repeats more often than most and that means clean hair and job security for us!

It’s a bird! It’s a drone! It’s 100% real LEGO!

You heard that right. Everything in this SU-N8 “Iridosornis” Reconnaissance Drone by Marius Hermann is made of real, unaltered LEGO. Even the pants (from Scala.) Even those large wings with engines (from Galidor.) And yes, all of those are real, genuine LEGO products that existed. Marius has made a name for himself by mixing these unconventional elements into his sci-fi builds, and he does it so well. Whereas prefabricated elements like the Galidor wings might not fit into a build such as this, it works well here and wouldn’t look as good without it. They provide a good contrast and balance between the smooth blues and the greebly greys.

SU-N8 "Iridosornis" Reconnaissance Drone

Despite the angry voices of distant fanatics that gatekeep LEGO to only the brick-built system and minifigures, I find that real creativity is thinking outside the box and using unconventional elements. I have a soft spot for builders who use these weird parts and mix them with “normal” LEGO. Because at the end of the day, if it wasn’t real LEGO, then I wouldn’t be writing about it!

Check out more creations using parts from Galidor and Scala!

Enjoy my jacket. You have 20 seconds to comply.

When Marius Herrmann said he’d start a series of LEGO robots with a sense of style I said color me intrigued! Here we have “Sialia”-N1 Police Enforcer adorned in a sassy blue number from the Scala line. In order to get this jacket in this specific color, you’d have to have bought the super-rare Scala 3158 Christian in Tough Wear set. Because nothing says tough-guy like a light blue blazer! I’m rather smitten by the look, actually. This robotic law enforcer comes with a matching reconnaissance drone to ensure that you are also smitten by the whole ensemble. Not convinced yet? Then check out our archives where Marius always keeps it interesting. I’ll certainly be on the lookout to see what other fashion-forward robots he comes up with.

"Sialia"-N1 Police Enforcer

Exploring other worlds with LEGO Creator 3-in-1 31115 Space Mining Mech [Review]

If you’re here, chances are you’re a big fan of the LEGO brand, so you already know that it’s the toy of endless possibilities. Even on more expensive sets, you’re most likely always going to get a good bang for your buck. And in terms of creative potential, Creator sets are some of the best at encouraging it, particularly 3-in-1’s which provide a great combination of inspiration and versatile parts. The latest addition to the line is finally here, and we’re eager to see if this space-themed kit is out of this world! Come along as we explore what LEGO Creator 3-in-1 31115 Space Mining Mech has to offer. The set will be available March 1st, and will retail for  US $24.99 | CAN $34.99 | UK £24.99.

The LEGO Group provided The Brothers Brick with an early copy of this set for review. Providing TBB with products for review guarantees neither coverage nor positive reviews.

Click to launch!

Robots with heads of rubber

Just when you think you’ve seen nearly every incarnation of LEGO robot to pass your computer screen, another master builder like Andreas Lenander shows up.

Ma.KMECHtoberFest2020 - family photo

While we’ve seen mechs before here on The Brothers Brick, we’ve never seen tires turned inside out to create a robot head. It took a few minutes staring at this build to realize that the head wasn’t a plastic brick, but was actually rubber. Everything about this scene here is fantastic, but I’m still in awe of the idea of using inside-out tires. Mind-boggling, you might say!

Orange and brown and very uncanny

I have no idea what this robot’s task is, but I think I’d probably prefer not to find out. What I do know, however, is that this organic-looking LEGO bot by Marco Marozzi plays host to a myriad of unusual parts used excellently. The oddest might be the brown Bellville horse saddle that makes up the bot’s mid-section between the orange bits, but don’t miss other details like the brooms behind the head or the maraca antenna. And ultimately, whatever its purpose was, I can’t escape from feeling this is what No-Face from Spirited Away would look like if he were a robot.

Forscher 3.KJ

Battle of the brick bots

The robots are taking over, and who doesn’t love a good mech when they see one? Adam Dodge‘s LEGO war mech looks to be a pretty unique take on the archetype — it really looks like Wall-E on steroids.

Wk3 - WAR

The caterpillar tread and slightly boxy aesthetic of this build are what are reminiscent of Wall-E, but of course all of the added brick-built artillery and armaments make this bot look quite a bit less than friendly. Certainly the weaponry of this build is where the great parts-usage happens. The gatling gun which is also the right arm of the bot is comprised of technic pieces. Some white 1×1 cones serve as unveiled missiles on the shoulder of the machine. The body/cockpit is constructed from mostly bricks and slopes with some tiling serving as accents. Overall this is one mean looking bot, perhaps an unfortunately fitting image for the rather dystopian times we are in currently.