Tag Archives: Moko

Ultraman

LEGO builder Moko has created an ultra-chibi version of Ultraman. Does that make this Chibi-Man? Or Ultra-Chibi? Chibi-Chibi-Spam-Ultra-Man? Well, whatever you call him, he’s a pint-sized pack of awesome. It’s the overall clean lines that make this build stand out to me. Clever use of quarter-circle and macaroni tiles create a cool take on the eyes, and plenty of slope brick helps make the figure feel streamlined.

ULTRAMAN

As a bonus, there’s a lot of articulation to play with, making this guy even more action-packed. It makes me wonder if the underlying structure could be adapted for even more characters at this scale. Maybe we’ll be lucky enough to have Moko give that idea a try.

ULTRAMAN

In the meantime, how does this build stack up against Moko’s other featured creations? There’s just one way to find out…click and see!

Death so flashy you’ll probably see it coming

As this LEGO model by Moko demonstrates, there are three things needed to be a sleek, stealthy assassin. Tight black outfit; check. Awesome hair; check. The ability to get into cool Spider-Man poses; check, check, and check. Not on the list is copious amounts of chrome accessories but this assassin does bling beautifully. With her chrome macaroni headset and the radar dishes on her boots I’d see this android assassin slinking across rooftops from a mile away. I’d hear the schick of her razor claws across my throat and still be mesmerized by her shiny bits as I fade out of existence. What a beautiful way to go! In another stroke of brilliance, her skirt is made from an inside-out rubber tire. It turns out, this wouldn’t be the first time we were mesmerized by Moko’s mechanized creations.

Silver nail

This knight shines on

Knights in shining armour are rarely as shiny as this LEGO creation. Moko’s knight mech is the shiniest knight I’ve seen. On top of the pure shiny factor, this guy is incredibly ornate to boot. The elegance is easily noticed in the halberd; the axe head and spike are eye catching focal points. The helmet is also distinct: while it might look a little large for the dwarf it’s intended for, it fits appropriately here. What’s truly amazing is how well the builder was able to sculpt the form using the limited palette of silver and gold pieces. The cleverest parts usage are the Hero Factory masks as thighs and knees.

鉄機兵

Does this robot look a little boxy to you?

A key concept of the Transformers line is for things to be “more than meets the eye.” Builder Moko has made something that really fits the brief. This LEGO storage crate is actually a fierce fighting robot.

First, let’s examine that outer shell. The decorations on the face of the cube are from printed 2×2 wedge tiles, a code tile from an EXO-FORCE set, and a number 7 tile from a 1991 Technic 8838 Shock Cycle set. Beyond that, it’s…just a box. I can easily imagine this being part of the background in some massive LEGO hanger diorama and never giving it a second thought. That’s some impressive camouflage.

Cube-Robo

But, with a few twists and turns (detailed in Moko’s blog post), this cube unfolds into a really cool robot. The necessary joints to cram the robot into a cube has the side effect of giving it a high level of articulation. It doesn’t feel like there was an inch of wasted space in this build. It may be a simple thing, but I also really like the choice of a transparent light-blue tile for the eyes. The color choices here really pop.

Cube-Robo

So the next time you see a bunch of boxes sort of shoved off to the side of a display, look again. You might just be in for a heck of a surprise.

Woodlouse-bots, roll out!

Woodlice are terrestrial isopods and, among other nicknames, are affectionately known as “roly-poly pill bugs” for their ability to roll into a ball. Though this ability is a natural defense mechanism, Japanese builder Moko drew inspiration from the woodlouse for their latest LEGO mech. Moko’s mech emulates the woodlouse’s segmented body thanks to staggered round shell detail elements, which appeared in black in 2012 Hero Factory sets Black Phantom and Toxic Reapa. This black armor is also reminiscent of the crab-like Garthim from The Dark Crystal.

Wood louse mech

As an added bonus, Moko’s woodlouse mech rolls into a ball just like the real thing. While the real life woodlouse does this to protect itself, I think it’s safe to say this mechanical critter can also use it for quick getaways. Now, that’s using your exoskeleton!

Wood louse mech

Trio of triangular mechs

What is better than a well-armed hard suit? How about three of them? Moko has put together a hard-hitting squad of brightly colored power armor mechs, each one sharing certain design elements, while sporting very different weapons and other capabilities.

Exo-suit 03 variation

First off, that heavy assault mech, with what looks like a laser-guided rocket launcher, and a shoulder-mounted machine gun. Next, a sniper model complete with some sort of sensor package, and lastly, if you can’t shoot ’em, you can pummel them with punches with the brawler on the right.

A texture to make your skin crawl off

While I have no discernable ability to build a Bionicle creation myself (though I always dream of one day building one), I’m a great admirer of the amazing creations Bionicle builders come up with. There is just so much more that’s possible than with bricks and plates alone. Take Moko’s Cancer for example. While it would be terrifying to encounter such a thing in reality, as a LEGO creation it’s really quite beautiful. The texture is what I’m really drawn to. Bionicle offers pieces in so many shapes, curved and flowing together that when paired together they give the appearance of a figure missing its skin, like Lord Zedd from the Power Rangers or perhaps something more alien, such as Marvel Comics’ Carnage.

Cancer

Springboard your adventure in this mechanical grasshopper

Hop around! Hop around! Hop up and up, and get down! In devising solutions for building robots, it’s sometimes best to start with examples found in nature. When Moko set out to build his latest LEGO mech, he looked to the springy grasshopper. Moko’s model is both an excellent representation of the insect and has just enough metallic bits to make it feel mechanical. Hopping power is provided by the legs’ robust hydraulic system, while the black pistol feet likely give it the ability to stick to nearly any surface.

Hopper

Jason, watch out! Here come the skeletons!

One of the most memorable movies of my childhood was the 1963 stop-motion feature Jason and the Argonauts which features the work of animation master Ray Harryhausen. This pair of skeletons by Moko look like they jumped right out the movie, passing through a Terminator filter on the way out. The skulls, made from this Bionicle skull part, are a perfect choice, and those ribs made from a creature claw are great too.

Skeleton

The minions of hell just got an upgrade

Japanese mecha builder Moko has been charming the world with his LEGO creations for more than a decade, but this latest character takes a darker turn. Moko’s “Hell Warrior” is an evil cyborg that uses mostly black Bionicle and Hero Factory (or “Constraction”) pieces, accentuated by an undead, half-hidden face built from several Krana masks. The overall effect is truly diabolical.

Hell Warrior

日本語を読める方はどうぞモコさんのブログを読んでください。

Duck duck robot

What do you do if your robot walker develops a waddle? Make it a feature rather than a bug, of course! At least, that’s what I like to think happened in the backstory for Moko‘s latest LEGO creation. This Mecha-Duck is a delight, nicely-built with some cool mechanical details, but also invested with a brilliant sense of fun and character. I’m pleased to see that, like its inspiration, the walker is also amphibious — there’s a little red propeller sitting at the rear, allowing for effective transportation on water too.

Ducky

Diamonds and gold are a mech’s best friend

The expansion of transparent clear elements over the past decade has allowed for some intricate builds like this glittering mech by Moko, named the MF-10 Diamond Empress. While the frame of the mech is black, it is clad in transparent clear armor formed from tiles, slopes, dishes, windshields, and more. The Diamond Empress lives up to its name with a few parts in rare non-production colors, such as the 2×2 round tile in trans clear. Aside from the build itself, my favorite aspect of this model is perhaps the use of trans clear 12x2x5 tails for the skirting. Meanwhile, chrome gold and transparent red accents provide additional visual interest.

MF-10 Diamond Empress

See more of this opulent mech