Tag Archives: TV Series

“Such a large bounty for such a small package.”

With a new season of Disney’s hit streaming series The Mandalorian scheduled for this fall as well as the impending release of LEGO’s Razor Crest 75292 set, enthusiasm for the fan-favorite bounty hunter and his young green friend is not going anywhere anytime soon. Here in Dan Ko’s build that enthusiasm is scaled down, yet it still retains enough detail and gravitas to make any fan of the show absolutely delighted.

The twin engines are masterfully yet minimally recreated by combining various cylindrical elements with printed round 2 x 2 tiles that add the perfect finishing touch. Dan utilizes another round 2 x 2 printed tile for the escape pod area on the top of the iconic gunship.

Although this model is quite small, it still features the bay door in the back which opens and closes.

Overall the build is a wonderful micro-scaled version of the beloved ship and provides some eye candy for fans eagerly waiting for the return of the series to the small screen this October.

Go west, life is synthetic there

“It doesn’t look like anything to me…” The stock response of the hosts from TV show Westworld is absolutely not applicable here. Mitch Phillips‘ LEGO rendition of a host being put together is immediately recognizable — the striking Vitruvian Man and the surrounding printing technology provide one of the show’s iconic images, familiar even to non-fans. But a closer look reveals some excellent building techniques on display as well as a fine capture of the overall feel. The robotic printing arm is well put together from a selection of Technic parts, and the half-formed host is a mass of different pieces, brilliantly conveying the idea of synthetic musculature. The lines on the torso, in particular, are excellent — check out those abs! The presentation of the model is spot-on too, with dramatic lighting creating a real sense of scale — this looms in the image, much larger in the eye than it is in real life.

Westworld Host Printing

LEGO Monkie Kid revealed with 8 sets and a TV show based on Chinese Monkey King legend [News]

LEGO has officially revealed the brand new theme, Monkie Kid, based on the Monkey King legend from the Chinese novel Journey to the West. The new theme includes eight sets and a hand-animated television series.

The sets range in price from US $34.99 to $169.99 and include a ship-based team headquarters, two large Monkey King and Demon Bull mechs, and a variety of vehicles. All Monkie Kid sets will be available worldwide and are available from LEGO now.

Take a closer look at each new LEGO Monkie Kid set and watch the trailer for the upcoming TV show

Your father’s Backdraft

“Pugh, Pugh, Barney McGrew, Cuthbert, Dibble, Grub.” If that means nothing to you, then you missed out as a child. The stop-motion animation show Trumpton — and its sister shows Chigley and Camberwick Green — were staples of British kids’ TV during the 70s, and repeated regularly into the 80s and 90s. Gentle tales of town and country life, narrated in the dulcet tones of UK-kids-TV-superstar Brian Cant, these series were charming and beautifully made — just like Jason Briscoe‘s latest LEGO creation: Trumpton Fire Station and its famous engine. For most kids, the undoubted stars of this particular fictional “universe” were these guys — rushing to the rescue of cats in trees, and even extinguishing the occasional fire.

Time For Trumpton

Retro, and chunky, and deliciously smooth, Jason’s re-creation of the Fire Engine and its crew is spot-on. I suspect this model may leave younger readers a little cold, but for anyone over the age of 40, this is likely to bring a warm rush of nostalgia. However, regardless of your knowledge of, or fondness for, the source material, these models are wonderfully made at an interesting scale, allowing Jason to faithfully capture the shapes and styles of the inspiration.

The fifth horseman of the Apocalypse?

I’m usually sad when quality animated shows reach their end. And sadness is an emotion often associated with Bojack Horseman. That show covered some pretty important topics like depression and addiction and is generally regarded as one of the best television series from the 2010s. Sure, the show may be ending, but not everything has to be a downer. Iain Heath brings us a LEGO version of Bojack who’s every bit as charismatic as his animated counterpart.

BoJack Horseman in LEGO

It’s the subtle craftsmanship that won me over on this build. 1×1 bricks with Technic holes serve multiple uses, providing a good SNOT connection on Bojack’s nose and implying a camera on his phone. The arms are posed at interesting angles, and even his shoes are stand-out mini-builds. And, of course, the head is a study in creative slopes and tiling.

This Bojack isn’t a one-trick-pony, either. A quick rebuild of the eyes using headlight bricks and printed 1×1 round tiles gives Bojack an additional range of expression.

BoJack Horseman in LEGO

Maybe it’s just me, but he still looks kinda depressed. Oh well. At least that’s series-accurate.

V is for Visitor, and Virtual, and Very Nice

Nostalgia time! Let’s travel back to the early 1980s and the classic sci-fi TV mini-series V. If you’re unfamiliar, the basic plot is that friendly human-looking aliens visit Earth. Yep. Just some run-of-the-mill totally benign alien pals. Totally legit. The fact that any more summary would require a “spoiler warning” tag should give you an idea that things go downhill from there. But I digress. We’re here to look at a great LEGO creation, after all. Huw Gwilliam has recreated the iconic Visitor Tanker Shuttle. This sleek craft has lines very similar to the Eagle-One from 1975’s Space: 1999. What? You haven’t seen that show either? *sigh* It’s probably streaming somewhere. Go watch it. You’ll be glad you did. Even if 1999 didn’t play out quite the same way in our reality.
Anyway. Huw’s model. It’s cool. Check out the Technic toothed plates in white on the cargo pods and in grey in the landing gear. The custom graphic work on the windows, Visitor logos, and minifigures is also top-notch.

Visitor Tanker Shuttle

Retro-TV-Space is totally a theme, right? Because I could sure use more of this sort of thing.

Time-travelling assassins are busting out all over

Messing with the timeline? You’d better watch out — the Commission are bound to send their best agents after you. Jonas Kramm takes inspiration from Netflix’s dramatisation of Gerard Way and Gabriel Bá’s Umbrella Academy, putting together this cool pair of busts depicting Cha-Cha and Hazel, a pair of professional time-travelling assassins. For those who haven’t seen the show, the pair of killers arrive in our time wearing huge carnival costume heads. Jonas has perfectly captured their sinister yet cartoon-like appearance, and the use of umbrellas as neckties works well for the suits but also acts as a nice little nod to the show’s title. If only we could use Cha-Cha and Hazel’s time-travelling abilities to make season 2 arrive a little sooner.

LEGO Umbrella Academy busts

Wile E. Coyote is the symbol of never giving up in anything you do...

If there’s the one time that I’m rooting for the bad guy, it’s Wile E. Coyote. He works so hard in all his traps and thingamajigs but the Road Runner not only always eludes and avoids them, but manages to make the contraptions work against poor Mr. Coyote. They don’t make TV cartoons like they used to, and this build by Chris Goddard brings back tons of memories. The Technic ball joints that make up Wile E. Coyote’s eyes popping out of his sockets describe his everlasting hunger and passion to never give up hope and to always keep trying

MOC: Beep! Beep! Roadrunner and Wile E. Coyote

Her name was Lola, she was a showgirl

The Levitating Over Land Automobile — better known as “Lola” — was made famous in our world through the TV Series Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and even appeared in an official LEGO set, 76077 Iron Man: Detroit Steel Strikes. Having said that, this build by Eric Teo is the version that you’d really want to bring home for a test drive, with striking curves. The only similarity is the windscreen, which uses the cockpit bow, with the rest of the body remodeled to bring out the best shapes of the 1960 Chevrolet Corvette.

1960 Chevrolet Corvette - “Lola” Just trying my hand in making “Lola.” Not my first moc for 2019, just the first one I photographed. #teamtopak

Dragon Ball Super’s Broly and Gogeta are built for the fight

Dragon Ball Super is the latest iteration of the hit Dragon Ball anime series. Builder Chak hei Mok has built LEGO versions of Broly and Gogeta, two iconic characters from the show. Slopes are extensively used to form each character’s muscles and spiky hair. Meanwhile, ball and socket joints allow for believable poses, and the eyes are packed full of attitude.

Dragonball super

LEGO Ideas 21316 The Flintstones [Review]

Last year, LEGO Ideas celebrated 10 years since the first fan idea became an official retail set. Who could have imagined the number of universes, places, and characters turned into official products since then? And now, one more idea joins the club — LEGO Ideas 21316 The Flintstones, a fan project by Andrew Clark, who is known among LEGO enthusiasts as the fan designer of another LEGO Ideas set, 21304 Doctor Who. With 748 pieces, the Flintstones set is much bigger than Andrew’s previous project. It will be available to LEGO VIPs starting on Wednesday, February 20th for US $59.99 | UK £54.99 | CA $79.99.

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The only good cat is a stir-fried cat

ALF, short for Alien Life Form, was a sitcom that ran in the ‘80s for almost 100 episodes. ALF comes from the planet Melmac, and throughout the series, he longs for the taste of savoring the family cat as a meal, since cats are the equivalents of our cattle in his home planet. The instantly recognizable ALF is covered with brown fur and has a rippled snout, which means being built with LEGO bricks is not an easy feat to pull off, but it’s executed nicely by Marcel V for this scene.  The core and atmosphere from the series are captured quite nicely with the familiar pastel-themed walls and TV stage prop windows with horizontal shutters in the foreground and part of a refrigerator at the back.

"The cat won't fit the toaster!"