About Bart Willen

Bart Willen (badboytje88) has been a fan of LEGO for as long as he can remember. When he hit puberty and slowly but surely started losing interest in the brick, LEGO released their first line of Harry Potter sets. Keeping Bart from slipping to a Dark Age. He is a fan of a quite broad range of themes, from Star Wars to Johny Thunder and from Elves to City. But somehow he always navigates back to the magical world of Harry Potter. He attends LEGO World in the Jaarbuurs in Utrecht on a yearly basis where he enjoys meeting other fans and seeing some of their creations 'in the brick'. You can check out his own creations here.

Posts by Bart Willen

Is this Maleficent again or one of her cousins?

Making LEGO brick built animals is something I always struggle with. Especially when they have to be minifig scale. Louis of Nutwood has no problem with brick built animals. His creation features an amazing brick built dragon. Which has been done before quite a couple of times before. Louis used bricks to build the wings, which I’ve never seen before. Builders quite often make the skin between the fingers of the wings out of a different parts. Fabric, cloth, or plastic with a pattern. The wings look great and are quite poseable. The face looks absolutely divine and the action posing was done exceptionally well. The fire effect looks better than most tv-show CGI fire bursts which makes the water near the dragon ripple.

The Black Dragon, Svart Dyr

This Tiki Shaman reminds me of the monster of Frankenstein

Builder Jake Hansen shows us you can make body parts out of body parts. Let’s look for all the body parts. The headdress uses hands and arms to represent tree branches. The eye sockets are made using LEGO minifigure torsos, and the same goes for the skulls around the Shaman’s belt. In fact, those look absolutely brilliant in their simplicity. But the absolute cutest has to be the minifigure legs used as toes–an absolute winner to me. The use of colour in this creation is also gorgeous, especially when it comes to the contrast between the vibrant necklace and headdress and the more muted grey of the figure.

Tiki Shaman

It started with a simple ring

LEGO builder Thorsten Bonsch‘s latest creation is amazing. It features a lovely brick-built bridge, and the arch at the base of the bridge uses the same technique as the first vignette in this series. The rest of the bridge looks like it is being held together by gravity, and there must be some brilliant building techniques in this model to hold it together. I find it great that the base of the first and the last vignette is a ring, which also ties into the story of The Hobbit. The tree in this model also deserves some love, as creating a big, natural-looking tree out of square plastic bricks is one of the hardest things to do.

The Hobbit (43/43)

Let’s also take our time to look back at a few of the 43 creations Thorsten made during this series. Thorsten treated us to some lovely interior decor with chairs made of wands on a sprue and whips, tables with cattle horn legs, and chandeliers made out of paint roller brush handles

He also surprised us with lovely brick-built heads, beasts, and animals. The troll was featured in not one, not two, but three creations, but each of them was different. And Thorsten didn’t stop after creating the troll. He also made an eagle, a spider, a statue head, and to top it off a dragon head.

Last but not least, lets give this social distancing elf some love.

The Hobbit (29/43)

Quite some minifigures were harmed in the making of this creation...

Elias tore apart quite a few figures to build this creation and his the use of torso’s in this creation is amazing. They are everywhere! From the columns to the altar, from the platform to the staff. Thirty torsos have been used in this LEGO creation. The thing I love the most is the way the printing on the torsos was incorporated in the build. There are a lot of city hoodies and licenses fantasy torsos used to represent cracks and crumbling down of this ruined temple. What torsos do you recognize? Also a special mention goes out to Elias for using the sprue from the flower stem with 3 large leaves for foliage.

Ruined Temple

Picture picture on the wall who, is the prettiest of them all

Ever since I saw the Hogwarts moving stairs model by Jonas Kramm I have this thing for LEGO paintings with elaborate golden frames. This creation by Kitkat1414 reminds me of that. In this creation, he used the minifigure torso in a brilliant way, representing the sails of the ship. The printing of the torso even adds some movement to the creation. However, the best used part in this creation has to be the Metalbeard part used as a miniature cliff. The painting in the middle of the frame is not the only true work of art — the paintings surrounding it also contain a lot of details.

01 The Masterpiece

Blood, sweat and tears – behind the scenes of a medieval construction project

I always wonder what it takes to build a beautiful, weathered LEGO building like the builds of Ralf Langer. His creations always leave me with the same questions. How are all these parts connected? How sturdy is it? Can you pick it up and move it around without it falling apart? What does the inside look like? How does he manage to create such amazing builds? Well, the answer is simple: All it takes is some blood, sweat and tears (and a couple of beers). Ralf’s latest build shows us a little behind the scenes. We can see a castle style building with the scaffolding still next to it. The scaffolding itself is quite cleverly made using lightsaber handles, plates, and a lot of tools.

The blood, the sweat, the tears: behind the scenes

The building itself is pretty as usual. Ralf uses a lot of different types of bricks to give his builds a weathered look. This also helps to avoid the “big grey wall” effect. The stained glass window is quite cleverly made by attaching transparent round tiles to transparent plates with a string net between them. Unfortunately for me, this behind-the-scenes creations answers none of my questions.

Vibrantly colored Elven Passage

With his latest creation Chris Perron proves a castle build doesn’t have to consist of mainly grey bricks. It can be vibrantly colored and still look stunning. Chris’s build is sand blue and dark blue with elements of gold. My guess is this windscreen with bubble cutout was the main inspiration for this LEGO creation. Such a smart way to use this part which was designed to be used as a cockpit for a vehicle. The single hinge finger has been cleverly hidden in the base of the model. The model is finished with some lovely trees in funky colors and a diagonal roof pattern I’ve so far only seen used as flooring in other creations. So that’s a nice little bonus right there.

Elven Passage

Don’t step into the Shimmer

Bart de Dobbelaer’s latest creation just might be inspired by the movie ‘Annihilation’. In the movie, a team of scientists volunteer to join a research expedition into the Shimmer. The Shimmer is an anomalous iridescent electromagnetic field that appears to be expanding at a rapid pace.

Bart’s creation reminds me of the scene where the team steps through the iridescent electromagnetic field and see the inside of the Shimmer for the first time. They stumble upon all sorts of mutated animal hybrids and a variety of beautiful vegetation. I love the two brown columns on each side of the Shimmer. I have no idea how they are constructed but they look amazing. The contrast between both worlds couldn’t be any bigger. The real world is dark and brown and muddy where the world inside the Shimmer is bright and filled with white and gold alien-like creatures.

the Shimmer

The Mountain, the Ocean and the River

I know we’ve featured the windmill before, but Hanwasyellowfirst made two additional builds called ‘Ocean House’ and ‘Riverside Scholars’ and they are exquisite! If these were LEGO sets, I would buy them in a heartbeat! There is a lot of creative parts usage in these buildings. I love how the spoked rounded top window look in combination with the ornamental lattice . There are quite a few different roof designs with all sorts of different parts used for shingles. Did you notice the fish ornamental used on top of the roof. I am not sure if Hanusedtobeyellow used it as a nod to the first LEGO ninja sets or if it is just a coincidence, but I am going for the first option. The riverside scholar building has the ornamental fence on it’s side, which looks stunning. The best thing about this building has to be the framing of the door and the foliage on the roof.

The Mountain Windmill, The Ocean House and The Riverside Scholars

A-frame brings the autumn, uhm, winter A-game

We featured Andrea Lattanzio’s cozy LEGO A-frame home a while ago. It seems however that the A-frame building went through a little bit of a makeover — the autumn theme has been changed to match the current winter season. It looks like the beautiful wooden tiles outside have gotten a fresh coat of red paint. Where the autumn edition of this creation featured minifigure hammers for a cobblestone base wall, the winter edition uses ingot bars for the brick-built wall. The use of the ingots look a bit better-maintained compared to the minifigure hammers, which matches the fresh paint job. One of the small details from the autumn build that I appreciated dearly was the use of mushroom radar dishes. I am glad those got featured in this creation too.

Santa's Cabin

The horse of pestilence

Did you know there is an urban legend about the position of a horse’s legs on a statue? If the horse is rearing, both front legs in the air, the rider died from battle. If one front leg is up that means the rider was wounded in battle. If the horse has all four hooves on the ground, the rider died outside battle. If that legend is true than we might assume that the rider of alex_mocs creation was wounded in battle. His statue to remember his bravery however didn’t stand the test of time. The rider is completely gone (if there ever was a rider). The horse itself is quite okay except for the pestilence growing across it’s back. This creation shows that there can be beauty in decay. I love all the different shapes of the mushrooms and making them white adds a nice contrast to the black horse.

Pestilence

Marrow of the Earth

I have to admit that I am not familiar with the source material for this mysterious being, if there even is source material. Therefore, I can only appreciate this LEGO creation by Anthony Wilson for what it is: a beautiful creation made out of LEGO. The main model of the skeleton looks like it is actually quite sturdy and articulate, and the black cape suits the dark feel of the subject of this creation. Although the entire skeleton appears to be symmetrical, the head isn’t, which gives it character. The rainbow-colored shrubbery adds a very nice contrast to the dark side of the creation. This surely is a beautiful portrayal of life and death.

Marrow of the Earth