Tag Archives: Futuristic

Like a wheel within a wheel

This LEGO concept car by Vince Toulouse has super-strong TRON:Legacy vibes. I mean…c’mon. Hubless Car could have been lifted right off the game grid. Okay, it’s not all black and neon like the rest of that world. But if Master Control ever lightened up on the color choices, red and sand blue would be awesome additions. Certainly, no one will complain about the general shape; it’s futuristic, sleek, and streamlined. And it’s just “real world possible” enough to feel like something you could drop a ton of money to own in the real world.

On the LEGO front, there are some fun part choices to call out. The canopy is a 5x9x5 half-sphere from the Jurassic World sets. The fins on the side are Bionicle skates, with the printed 2×2 logo tile sourced from a 2004’s Alpha Team: Mission Deep Freeze sets.

Hubless Car

In this alternate angle, you can really see the intricate shaping that makes this model pop. I love the curves coming off of the rear wheels, and bracketing the spoiler. And those front forks… If you’re not a fan of TRON, maybe you’d be comfortable dropping this vehicle into the Blade Runner universe as a variation on the Spinner.

Hubless Car

At this research facility, the future is NOW!

Inspired by the work of Syd Mead, builder Jme Wheeler packs a lot of punch into a fairly small area, creating a sprawling, Futurist research facility in LEGO microscale form.

The builder makes great use of a limited black and blue color palette on the buildings and all light gray rocks. Restricting the colors of the structures gives the whole facility a cohesive look. It makes the green plant matter quite striking and yet doesn’t distract from the beautiful building designs. The tall, stacked building gives us some impossible architecture that somehow feels right at home in the scene and you can almost imagine workers bustling through the covered walkways between buildings. I love the use of the gray curved tiles to represent a raised road or perhaps a monorail track. The windmills are a clever addition and the tiny island with a single palm tree is a great little gem hiding in plain sight.

Sheltering Sky Research Facility

Who is a good cyber-boy?

In the wake of global automation, robots are replacing humans in many jobs in factories, offices, and even in space. However, there is at least one thing robots will never be able to replace — man’s best friends, dogs. But even dogs have to keep us with technology push, so Red designs a K-9 multi-purpose unit of the future. He wonderfully captures the dog’s shape using medium-sized Technic panels from Star Wars buildable figures, while a bold choice of pieces in silver is what makes the build special. You’d better think twice before patting this boy!

K-9 Multi-purpose Support Unit

Imaginary islands, real LEGO bricks

When looking for unique builds to showcase here at The Brothers Brick, we see a lot of digital creations. There’s nothing wrong with that; virtual bricks can let a builder explore color combinations that LEGO has yet to produce, or to forgo the limitations that gravity would put on a delicate creation. But when you see something that you’re pretty sure is a render, only to discover it’s real? That’s something special. Oh, sure, Eli Willsea tried to throw me off by titling their creation The Imaginary Islands. But considering this was part of a real-world collaboration for BrickWorld, I think I spotted the clues that this is, indeed, a physical model. And what a model it is! A futuristic city floats above a lush landscape, which sits amid a calm sea.

The Imaginary islands

I really like the use of carrot tops in the vegetation and the inverted Queen Watevra’s crown atop one of the buildings. What does puzzle me, though, is just how those waterfalls work. Is the city pumping up a ton of extra water from the sea? Is it the result of some sort of extra-dimensional gate gone wrong? Gasp! Is all that water around the base not a sea at all, but rather a giant lake of city-generated sewage? Is this actually a dystopian nightmare after all? I….I think I need to go lie down now.

Skate for your life!

Kids, always wear protective gear when skating or cycling – unless you take part in a wild futuristic survival race, and your life depends on your score. Paddy Bricksplitter reveals a roller skater of the future: a courageous racer running in a pair of very high-tech roller-skates. The dynamics of the scene and posture of the figure tell a story of some death-or-glory showdown. Besides the excellent composition, the build is remarkable for its scale, which perfectly suits Rey’s head. Finishing everything off is spot-on use of multiple stickers from various LEGO themes.

Skate Or Die!

Wicked-cool gunship will shred its enemies

There is little doubt that this gunship by Mark Stafford is one deadly ship, from its sleek black radar-eating surface to the whisper-quiet propulsion engines, forward blasters, and armor-piercing rail guns. Speaking of rail guns, Mark has found a very surprising use for the segmented garage door part.

01 Arikara

This gunship also features some very well designed mechanical greebly parts along the spine, which complement the sleek black sculpted lines.

05 Rear Angles

Gravity ends as the race begins...

When it comes to futuristic racing games, the Wipeout series has been going strong since it first appeared on the Playstation back in 1995. Thanks to Volker Brodkorb, we can now enjoy two Wipeout racers in LEGO form, such as this sleek-looking bad-boy. The builder has done an excellent job at using curved slope elements and hinges to form the aerodynamically shaped body. The red, white and blue color scheme is also particularly well-executed.

WipEout - Go Fast Or Go Home

Next up is an exciting ride comprised of dark blue and different shades of gray.

WipEout - Go Fast Or Go Home

The split down the front-end of this flying vehicle makes for an excellent contrast to the first model. This one also makes good use of custom cut stickers from the Ninja Turtles Shellraiser.

WipEout - Go Fast Or Go Home

Take your own Blade Runner 2049 car for a spin [Instructions]

The spinner car from the original 1982 movie Blade Runner had an upgrade for the sequel, Blade Runner 2049. While the upgrade involved more than a lick of light bluish grey paint, those curved front prongs are more than a nod to the original design. GolPlaysWithLEGO has designed a lego version of the car Ryan Gosling’s character K drives in 2049, and has kindly shared instructions to allow other fans to build the model.

Spinner 2049

Click here to see the instructions

Advertising the derelict remnants of a city street

Broken windows, damaged buildings, garbage on the street and infrastructure destroyed are some of the tell-tale signs of a post-apocolyptic world. There’s ample of opportunity to see some post-apocolyptic decay in this fantastic diorama by W. Navarre that centres around a couple of office buildings in what used to be part of a city and descends into an underground world of “every man for himself.” The Chima game card works surprisingly well as an advertising sign, and the collapsed sign with the Nike logo has seen better days. I particularly like the subterranean part of the build; it’s like an underground car park that has been repurposed, and there’s plenty of pipes, wires and drains to catch your eye.

3012 - Decades Afterwards (As Captured by the Camera)

There’s a lot to admire in this closer view of the rear portion teased in the image above.  Click to see an edited version full of special effects

The coolest space fire truck you’ll ever see

Everyone loves a good LEGO fire truck, there’s just something about them; classic, timeless and a throwback to our childhood days. Builder Frost puts a new spin on the traditional rendition with his futuristic space fire truck fully staffed by robotic firefighters.  I could easily see it serving a futuristic city right here on earth too, since it may not see much use in a low oxygen environment. Then again, it is the future we’re talking about here…

Febrovery 2018 17

The build is packed with play features, including a detachable fire drone on the back, forward water blasters hidden under the grille, and of course an elevating water cannon. My favorite feature has to be the compartments on the sides of the truck where the robots sit, ready for action.

Unmanned Fire Rover Features

Leg it to the nearest temple in times of need

LEGO creations often begin with the completed appearance in mind, but sometimes a particular part can stimulate the creative process. In the case of this microscale scene by David Zambito, it was the dark tan leg parts (either from the luggabeast  in 75148  Encounter on Jakku or from Rhino in 76099 Rhino Face-Off by the Mine) that were the starting point for his build.  The desert temple has a futuristic, ‘other world’ feel.  The use of the legs to give shape to the terrain and temple structure is inspired, but I love the entrance made with a minifigure open backpack part.

Salvage your treasures from under the sea

Imagine a future where the sea levels rise rapidly, causing massive flooding to coastal regions and changing seaside resorts into underwater history. Jonas Norlen has used this scenario as the back story to his latest LEGO creation,  Storken, a giant robot developed by the Coast Guard to salvage things from the bottom of the sea. The Storken looks super futuristic with cables and lights aplenty, albeit with a hint of comedy thanks to those gangly limbs. The hovering Coast Guard helicopter above the robot is ideal to give a sense of scale, and the same goes for the cute little truck in his hand and the blue tractor at his feet. I particularly love the colour blocking used for the robot, which gives it a very realistic Coast Guard ‘corporate’ feel.

storken1

Utilising a Storken to find the soap in the bath tub is definitely considered overkill.