Tag Archives: Andreas Lenander

It was a lovely day in paradise, but it was about to go horribly wrong

If you live in the oasis city of Kaligem, safe behind the sturdy walls, nestled among white towers and golden spires you might count yourself fortunate. But your good fortune is coming to a swift end in this scene by Andreas Lenander which depicts the final moments of a city that has brought down the wrath of the gods in the form of a giant wall of sand that would give the Coriolis storms of Arrakis a run for its money.

The story of Kaligem...

An unusual way to take your first steps into a larger world

The world feels like a dangerous place sometimes, and it’s only logical that parents would want to keep their babies safe when they venture out. That said, this solution from Andreas Lenander seems just a little bit extreme. The Baby Bubble Mech sure is a work of art, though.  There’s just enough bulk to the mech’s arms and legs to suggest a light and strong exo-suit, and that bubble cockpit does give a wide field of view. And speaking of that view, does the part selection there suggest a lunar landscape fit for Wallace and Gromit? After all, “everyone knows the moon is made of cheese“…

Baby Bubble Mech

If you enjoyed this odd walkabout, you’ll definitely want to check out our other “baby build” featured creations. They’re all cute and only mildly creepy.

Honest.

Mum says it’s my turn to fly the X-wing!

It seems that Star Wars is experiencing a baby fever. We’ve had enough of surprise fathers, sisters, and *tries not to throw up* grandfathers, so I welcome the new and unexpected. Recently a certain cute green gremlin took pop-culture by storm, and replaced Minions as the default for Facebook mom memes. It’s 2021 and I still see the words “chiccy nuggies” and “choccy milk” in the same sentence. But whatever, babies are cute. Andreas Lenander has caught the bug and built a babyfied X-wing and some baby rebels.

Baby X-wing pilots on Yavin IV

All jokes aside, I really like this babyfied idea for being a new unique take on Star Wars. Just a few weeks ago I wrote about a small build by my friend Ross, where baby Greedo confronts baby Han over a bottle of blue milk. And Andreas’s build is really well done. The walls of the Yavin base offer plenty of variety in detail to keep it from becoming bland and boring. Andreas keeps the X-wing as accurate to the source material as he can, despite the small size. It’s a really difficult ship to get right, even in larger sizes. So big applause to Andreas, he won me over with this build, and not because of the babies.

Caught the baby fever? There are some more baby creations to see…
Or had enough of babies? Check out Andreas’s other builds that we’ve featured. No babies in those, I promise!

A light for the dark waters

The weather is warming up here in the Northern Hemisphere and so are the waters. Beach and boating season is truly upon us as well as maritime scenes which wouldn’t be complete without a lighthouse. Andreas Lenander’s LEGO model surely embodies this summertime energy.

The lighthouse

Lenander builds his lighthouse on top of a rocky island composed of dark grey and olive green slopes, bricks, tiles, and plates of varying types and sizes. There are two smaller islands similarly composed, all three islands rest on top of a vast sea of light blue trans-clear 1×2 tiles. There are a couple of trees on the main island fashioned out of orange 1×1 flower pieces and yellow leaves which pop against the darker colors comprising this work. While the build as a whole seems ominous, the brick-built light house offers a comforting light to those wandering the seas.

A round of remarkable rovers

February is behind us, and so another Febrovery also comes to an end. The month-long tribute to the classic space rover brought us many charming and clever space rovers, but there are still rovers trickling in and I couldn’t let these gems by Andreas Lenander go unsung.

A good rover is not just about the vehicle, but the terrain it is built to traverse, and this one features a fractured surface filled with glittering jewels. But as Andreas says in the title of this model, it is all about the wheels, and these built wheels have bite. I’m talking about the tooth element used along the inner edge of the rims.

OCS-82

And speaking of wheels, this rover comes with double wheels in front and enough ground clearance to deal with the most rugged ground the universe can dish out. The stark black and white colors and the lights make me think Interstellar.

MR-28X

Daaamn bro, check out this rover’s rims

With the Perseverance recently landing on Mars, rovers are all the rage again. And when you’re building a cool LEGO model like a rover, what better way to make it ice cold than to give it some giant rims, just like Andreas Lenander has.

Q-21-R

While I’ve seen the 1×2 plate with rounded corners used as tiny rover tracks before, simply by flipping it up on its side, this rover puts them to work in an all new, spectacular way. By only pressing one side of the pieces together – leaving a gap on the opposite side – it’s quite possible to bend flat or square bricks to make curves and circles. This technique might not fly in an official set, but who says LEGO fans have to listen to any rules when they’re making their own creations. It may just be a simple looking little 1×2 plate with rounded corners, but I know tons of LEGO builders were excited when they first saw it. This is just another innovative use for it.

Roam around in a rad rover

Even been in one of those situations where a massive rover vehicle would do a lot better off-road than a minivan? I have, and I almost got stuck! Builder Andreas Lenander shows off the ride I should have been driving that day.

CDX-21 - FebRovery begins...

I love how untraditional this vehicle is compared to a normal LEGO car. The wheels are built from scratch, using angled bricks that really give off a rugged vibe. Looking closely you can see that the central spokes of the wheel rim are made from a pirate ship steering wheel! Incredible!

Also, the tree in the background is made up of brown whips wrapped around an antenna. Very clever.

Clearly, this thing can crag up any canyon and still come out without a scratch. I mean, would you want to mess up that sick paint job?

Christmas stories in a galaxy far, far away

T’was the night before Lifeday and all through the galaxy, not a creature was stirring, except…except…ah heck, nothing rhymes with galaxy! Andreas Lenander re-imagines the storybook scene set with a Star Wars twist, showing Lord Vader reading a heart-warming tale of the treacherous Rebellion, and that fateful night when they destroyed his favorite battle station.

Merry christmas!

Top Secret: Roswell 1947

Aliens get a bad rap, don’t they? They’re scary, mysterious, and they’re the bane of midwestern farmers and cattle everywhere. They’re also seemingly responsible for a slew of uncanny and sometimes hilarious crop circles and plus they’ve got that whole probing thing which some folks have mixed feelings about. Andreas Lenander calls this LEGO diorama Roswell 1947. The depiction of the UFO scorching the earth does nothing to squelch the alien’s reputation but it is admittedly cool. The large saucer dishes go way back to the X-Pod line from ’04-’05. The light brick built into the landscape gives this piece that extra helping of awesomesauce. You may (ahem) probe deeper into our archives to see just how fascinated we are with Andreas’ stuff and aliens in general.

Roswell 1947...

A different kind of LEGO mosaic

Sure, 1×1 studs or square plates certainly can get a mosaic job done, the fairly recent LEGO Art sets are case in point, but there is always more than one approach to an art form. In this recent LEGO model built by Andreas Lenander, he admittedly takes a crack at a different way to mosaic with some inspiration from Katie Walker.

Pondering misfortunes...

The approach here is primarily utilizing the 1×1 cheese slope in the creation of the mosaic. Lenander not only does a beautiful floor with this process of mosaic-work, but he also creates an amazing brick-built wall that has the aesthetic of a stained glass window using translucent clear 1×1 cheese slopes in popping complimentary colors. Of course, the structures formed by this technique are not stable as there aren’t any stud connections made here, but as long nobody is turning this model upside-down or giving it a good shake, we have an amazing build to look at. Pictured below is a closer look at the painstaking process.

Robots with heads of rubber

Just when you think you’ve seen nearly every incarnation of LEGO robot to pass your computer screen, another master builder like Andreas Lenander shows up.

Ma.KMECHtoberFest2020 - family photo

While we’ve seen mechs before here on The Brothers Brick, we’ve never seen tires turned inside out to create a robot head. It took a few minutes staring at this build to realize that the head wasn’t a plastic brick, but was actually rubber. Everything about this scene here is fantastic, but I’m still in awe of the idea of using inside-out tires. Mind-boggling, you might say!

The beauty and the beasts

Last week, we took a look at Andreas Lenander‘s recent mech in the style of Maschinen Krieger. It turns out, at home, Andreas has a small hangar of these ghastly war machines. Last week’s Ma.K SAFS Raketenwerfer seems to be somewhat cute compared to the new massive two-legged Ma.K Strauß. Looking straight into the darkness of its spherical cockpit gives me shivers. Fortunately, the build is accompanied by a wonderful autumn tree. Bonus points for the striking contrast between black and yellow; this is how you create a great composition using colors.

Ma.K Strauß

In case your daily dose of terrifying war machines is at least two, here’s something more bizarre — a four-legged Ma.K Käfer. You know, I’m happy to see more pretty trees balancing out the mech’s gloominess.

Ma.K Käfer