Tag Archives: Andreas Lenander

Christmas stories in a galaxy far, far away

T’was the night before Lifeday and all through the galaxy, not a creature was stirring, except…except…ah heck, nothing rhymes with galaxy! Andreas Lenander re-imagines the storybook scene set with a Star Wars twist, showing Lord Vader reading a heart-warming tale of the treacherous Rebellion, and that fateful night when they destroyed his favorite battle station.

Merry christmas!

Top Secret: Roswell 1947

Aliens get a bad rap, don’t they? They’re scary, mysterious, and they’re the bane of midwestern farmers and cattle everywhere. They’re also seemingly responsible for a slew of uncanny and sometimes hilarious crop circles and plus they’ve got that whole probing thing which some folks have mixed feelings about. Andreas Lenander calls this LEGO diorama Roswell 1947. The depiction of the UFO scorching the earth does nothing to squelch the alien’s reputation but it is admittedly cool. The large saucer dishes go way back to the X-Pod line from ’04-’05. The light brick built into the landscape gives this piece that extra helping of awesomesauce. You may (ahem) probe deeper into our archives to see just how fascinated we are with Andreas’ stuff and aliens in general.

Roswell 1947...

A different kind of LEGO mosaic

Sure, 1×1 studs or square plates certainly can get a mosaic job done, the fairly recent LEGO Art sets are case in point, but there is always more than one approach to an art form. In this recent LEGO model built by Andreas Lenander, he admittedly takes a crack at a different way to mosaic with some inspiration from Katie Walker.

Pondering misfortunes...

The approach here is primarily utilizing the 1×1 cheese slope in the creation of the mosaic. Lenander not only does a beautiful floor with this process of mosaic-work, but he also creates an amazing brick-built wall that has the aesthetic of a stained glass window using translucent clear 1×1 cheese slopes in popping complimentary colors. Of course, the structures formed by this technique are not stable as there aren’t any stud connections made here, but as long nobody is turning this model upside-down or giving it a good shake, we have an amazing build to look at. Pictured below is a closer look at the painstaking process.

Robots with heads of rubber

Just when you think you’ve seen nearly every incarnation of LEGO robot to pass your computer screen, another master builder like Andreas Lenander shows up.

Ma.KMECHtoberFest2020 - family photo

While we’ve seen mechs before here on The Brothers Brick, we’ve never seen tires turned inside out to create a robot head. It took a few minutes staring at this build to realize that the head wasn’t a plastic brick, but was actually rubber. Everything about this scene here is fantastic, but I’m still in awe of the idea of using inside-out tires. Mind-boggling, you might say!

The beauty and the beasts

Last week, we took a look at Andreas Lenander‘s recent mech in the style of Maschinen Krieger. It turns out, at home, Andreas has a small hangar of these ghastly war machines. Last week’s Ma.K SAFS Raketenwerfer seems to be somewhat cute compared to the new massive two-legged Ma.K Strauß. Looking straight into the darkness of its spherical cockpit gives me shivers. Fortunately, the build is accompanied by a wonderful autumn tree. Bonus points for the striking contrast between black and yellow; this is how you create a great composition using colors.

Ma.K Strauß

In case your daily dose of terrifying war machines is at least two, here’s something more bizarre — a four-legged Ma.K Käfer. You know, I’m happy to see more pretty trees balancing out the mech’s gloominess.

Ma.K Käfer

Guten tag, Raketenwerfer!

The Brothers Brick regular Andreas Lenander has built a LEGO Ma.K SAFS Raketenwerfer, which I’m pretty sure is German for “launching rockets in a field of olive cheese wedges”. Don’t quote me on that. But that’s pretty much what is going on here. It’s just a small part of what is in store from Andreas in October. I’ll keep an eye out for what this builder is up to and I advise you do the same. This will get you started.

Ma.K SAFS - Raketenwerfer

It’s come full-circle

Andreas Leander has us reeling at the sight of this mesmerizing SHIPtember build. Though its perfection might deceive you, the STS Serpent is not a render! This stunning LEGO exploration vessel measures to around 110-120 studs long, including its rear engine and cannons. The secret to its cookie-cutter form– a skeleton of curved train tracks hidden under layers of slope bricks and tile pieces. Andreas does a wonderful job of balancing smooth and greeble, opting for a textured “underbelly” in contrast to a smooth, studless exterior. The cannons on its side are a fantastic addition, really, the chef’s kiss on top of it all. It’s truly a vessel fit for any space expedition!

STS Serpent

Lovin’ this SHIP? You can check out other builds by Andreas by clicking here.

Operation space-goat teleportation

Space is the place for ground-breaking science like figuring out how to teleport rare pieces of your LEGO collection from one place to another. Andreas Leander is here conducting the research in his latest diorama. It follows the everyday lives of Sven and his crew at Epsilon IV as a part of Andreas’ ongoing series of cinematic Classic Space builds. This time, the crew is trying out a new contraption to teleport a space-goat, but rest assured, none have been harmed in the process.

Testing the new teleport on Epsilon IV...

The teleportation device is made with a variety of tubes running along a simple frame. The tubes feed into a stack of different-sized radars and a Harley Davidson wheel that hovers ominously over the test subject. Alternating long wedge plates and 1×2 rounded plates surround a single space-goat, totally oblivious of what’s to come. The platform construction is super captivating to look at and the blue lighting at its center creates a gorgeous atmospheric glow throughout the build. I’m also loving the details scattered around the scene. An old mech makes an appearance in the background, which we assume is used for transporting the space-goat from pod to platform. If you look even closer, you might see that the pods each have a single plant piece for the space-goats to munch on as they wait for their turn. All this talk of space-goat teleportation has many of us wondering when these space-goats will start arriving into our LEGO rooms. We can’t guarantee any goats, but do keep an eye out!

In the meantime, check out some more Neo-Classic Space creations from our archives!

A desert dwelling worth gold ingots

As any builder knows, the release of an existing LEGO piece in a new colour provides lots of opportunities for building. Such was Andreas Lenander‘s thinking when getting hold of the gold ingot in tan, a new colour for the piece. His build of the aptly named Kumi’dia residence utilises this part all over the middle-eastern style dwelling. The ground is packed with these ingots to represent cobblestone brickwork as well as the textured base of the build. But my favourite is their combination with masonry bricks and 1×2 rounded plates for the textured wall. With a sprinkle of dark tan here and there, it perfectly conveys the weathered wall of the desert retreat.

Kumi'dia residence

Some gold and transparent light blue parts adorn the top of the building, conveying the resident’s wealth. In addition, Andreas uses a Bespin hemisphere part (from the Star Wars: Planet series) for the dome. Aside from the building itself I really like the small tree in the courtyard. It uses lasso and whip parts connect the leaves, which is a unique building technique and difficult to get right.

See more of Andreas Lenander’s builds here on TBB, as well on his Flickr, where he has similar architectural builds.

LEGO brick shows its true colors

No matter what color we are on the outside, inside, we are all the same. If you crack us open, we spill our bright and beautiful ABS plastic filling out into endless possibilities of shapes and forms. Andreas Lenander reminds us that many beautiful and amazing things can be created from LEGO elements, which have certainly come a long way since that first 2×4 classic red brick.

The beginning...red

A welcome shelter from the cold

If you are traveling across the land in winter, a place to shelter for the night and get out of the cold can be a true treasure. In this scene by Andreas Lenander, a humble stone tower provides a place for weary travelers to escape the harsh temper of winter. The use of stacked mason bricks at the corners provides subtle texture, along with the simple choice of a few green plates. I also love the river breaking out of the base, with some transparent plates to give the brook a babbling appearance.

Kiruna watchtower

Chubby Grimlock is the best Grimlock

So…anyone else finding that self-isolation has lead to needing to let a notch or two out on your belt? It can’t be just me, as this LEGO Grimlock by Andreas Lenander seems to have put on a few ounces as well. Personally, this cute and cuddly version of the leader of the Dinobots feels like an upgrade. I like the highly-articulated tail, the use of ingots to break up the the curved slopes, and those cute little arms.

Chubby Grimlock

At least he’s venturing outside, based on those flowers. I should probably do that, too.