Tag Archives: Creature

Creepy crawly or fuzzy & fluffly (yes, that’s possible in LEGO), we love our LEGO animals. Check them out here, and fall in love yourself.

Kissed by a rose in a little shop of horrors

Some people think talking to plants helps them grow faster. To that, I say it’s all great until one of those plants turns into a man-eating flower bent on devouring you, green thumb and all. Unafraid of the consequences, Jayfa built this LEGO beauty of a ferocious flower. The curved stem and flower petals are cleverly formed using constraction (constructible action figure) elements, along with palm tree leaf pieces and a tan prickly bush. Fortunately, this looks like something you would find in a Castlevania game instead of your backyard, but you never know what the garden guru next door might be cooking up….

Kiss From a Rose

If you like fantastical creatures like this, you’ll also want to check out Jayfa’s colorful Rygas the Basilisk.

Stop! Hammer Time!

Hammerhead sharks (Sphyrnidaeare) are found worldwide in warmer waters along coastlines and continental shelves. They are aggressive hunters who feed on smaller fish, octopuses, rays, squid, crustaceans and even other sharks. However, this particular hammerhead shark, rendered by Dallen Powell, would rather help you install new cabinets in your kitchen or build a deck out back. He’s the type of shark that knows which nails work best with joist hangers and which ones are best for baseboard molding. With this shark, it is always hammer time. The expression on his toothy face says that he gets the pun too. You should nail down the rest of Dallen’s content as he is no stranger to pun-filled renders. Now, who has that one song stuck their head? You know the one. Sing it with me. “Y’all gonna make me lose my mind, up in here, up in here!”

Hammerhead Shark

Tougher than crocodile skin

Crocodiles are one of the toughest animals on the planet. Makes sense, considering their ancestors were around during prehistoric times. So why not create a mech in their image? This excellent mecha croc by Mitsuru Nikaido is one of the coolest I’ve seen. All of the plating and fine detail make for a handsome and fierce opponent.

LEGO Mecha Crocodile Mk2-04

As a big animal person, I’m always impressed by lifelike body-shaping, and I’m not sure it could be done better here, especially considering it uses a plethora of pieces to give it that mech look. To me, that seems more difficult than building a realistic croc. I love everything about that head, including the lever based used for the eye. The back legs and perfect taper of the tail are also noteworthy.

LEGO Mecha Crocodile Mk2-06

Mitsuru Nikaido is no stranger to impressive animal mechs. Just take a look at his chameleon (scroll down), lemur, dragonfly, and crane and grasshopper duo.

You’re going to need stronger herbicides

This latest LEGO creation by master builder Aaron Newman is the stuff of nightmares for those who enjoy perfectly manicured lawns and neatly tended gardens. If that is you, stock up on a few 50-gallon drums of your preferred herbicide, or else dial your lawn service’s emergency line immediately! Inspired by the manticore of classical mythology, Aaron’s “planticore” is part flower, part root, part weed, and fully territorial. Stay away from the dandelion head that’s reminiscent of the lion that formed part of the manticore, as well as the many blooms at the tail that effectively evoke the scorpion stinger. The aggressively-posed beast is joined by a swarm of brick-built bees and fierce female faeries to ruin your country club’s casual croquet tournament.

The Planticore

Aaron is well-known in the LEGO community for both his creature builds and his dynamic minifigure poses, and he does not disappoint in either category here. I am personally quite partial to the various Elves hairpieces on his faeries, and the way he uses legs taken off of the hips for more natural stances takes them to the next level. Don’t miss the pink afro minidoll hair as a clever clover blossom, either. The croquet wicket, with the DUPLO ball on its way through, sets the small scale of the build beautifully, and the editing effects with the grass and sky lend it a wonderful outdoor atmosphere. I suspect that I have several stray planticores roaming about in my own yard, judging by the weeds and chaos I see out there; or maybe I am just too busy trying to build LEGO like Aaron to prune and mow…

It gave me the creeps. It was all it had to give.

Inevitably there are some nights when, just as we’re finally drifting off to sleep, we are jostled awake by startling and unpleasant thoughts. Did I pay that gas bill? Did the dog go potty before bed? Is that Eric Porterfield behind the hamper? You may as well just write off sleep for the rest of the night once you get going with that. Amado Canlas Pinlac has built one such unsettling thing to give you the heebie-jeebies right before falling asleep.

Giant Red Centipede

The giant red centipede (Scolopendra Heros) can reach up to 8 inches (200mm) in length and lives in the Southwestern United States and Northern Mexico. Amado’s version is three times that size and lives wherever it damn well pleases, like in your sock drawer! Sleep tight.

Building the evolution: Pokémon Venusaur

One of the three final evolutions of the original Red and Blue game’s starter Pokémon, Venusaur is an iconic part of the franchise’s history. The seed originally found on its primary Bulbasuar form has blossomed into a radiant rafflesia-like flower, which is also the focus of Dae Vead’s beautiful LEGO version. Utilising clear building contrasts between the modelled reptilian body and the organic pieces used to form the plant elements results in a satisfying model of the beast. Standing tall against an appropriately sized tree further helps realise the monster’s epic scale and acts as a great framing device for a wonderful creation

Venusaur 2

Weird Galidor bugs lurk in the dark

Psst–Hello? Are you awake? So, I don’t want to alarm you or anything but Ben Tritschler just built this creepy crawler he calls Beast of the Dark 2. It has wings, antennae, crazy spines, and teeth like from one of those alien predator movies. Ben says it is venomous and hungry. Oh, and it totally makes use of a Galidor Ooni head, so…yeah. Make use of that information however you see fit. Like, who knows what other forms of weirdness lurks around here in the dark, right? The title “Beast of the Dark 2” implies there might be more than one of them. Like maybe a whole swarm? Well, anyway, I’m sure it’s no big deal. Forget I mentioned it. Go back to sleep. Good night.

Beasts of the dark 2

This jelly is totally my jam

I have two things to brighten your day. One is a recipe for jelly cookies. The other is this creation by Djokson called Umi the Jelly. Her hobbies include drifting aimlessly and tending to her coral garden which, truth be told, would reduce stress if most of us spent our days doing the same. She seems quite at peace drifting among the colorful reef. Her tendrils, translucent flowing limbs, even the choice of background color all comprise a rather tranquil composition. This jelly creature is totally my jam or um…jelly, as it were. See, I told you this would brighten your day!

Umi the Jelly

A collection of Cambrian creatures

The Cambrian Period was the first geological period of the Paleozoic era, lasting from 541 million to 485.4 million years ago. This time in earth’s history witnessed an explosion in the appearance of multicellular organisms like those represented by these LEGO sea creatures built by Luis Peña. Each one is a prehistoric work of art worthy of display in a museum.

Cambrian (or Cambrick?) Creatures

Have a closer look at these sea creature’s from earth’s distant past.

Slyme wins the internet

The internet is a fun, stress-free place to live, work, and play where everyone is civil to one another. Why just today I received a courteous email from a Canadian pharmaceutical company who would like to help me gain valuable length and girth (whatever that means) and another email from a super-polite Nigerian prince who offered to share his fortune with me. Do I want to click to see a photo of the fattest pussycat I would ever see? You bet I do! I literally can’t think of any way that could go horribly wrong. Among all of this internet surfing, I had stumbled upon this charming creation by Fedde Barendrecht.

Slyme

It is most parts LEGO, some parts painted Blu-tac, and all parts slimy goodness. Andrew says this could go viral, which is The Brothers-Brick technical internet speak for-its super cool. You should click on all of Fedde’s content because he is no stranger to building a menagerie of little weirdos just like this one. Later today I might get into a dignified political debate with someone Josh says is probably a Russian troll. I’d sure like to meet a Russian troll! I bet they’re as cute as this little guy here. What a delightful day on the internet this has been!

Whale watching without getting wet

Creating organic natural shapes using plastic bricks is not a simple thing, and making those shapes fit together into something simple and beautiful is truly an art form. Despite being monochromatic, this sculpture of a Humpback whale by Anthony Séjourné does an amazing job of capturing the majestic grace of one of the world’s largest marine mammals. I especially liked the use of so many hollow studs to represent barnacles. And the fluke is quite nice as well (that’s the whale’s tail, for those less well versed in whale biology).

Lego HumpBack Whale - atana studio

Bionicle dragon rises from the water

It’s amazing what a talented LEGO builder can achieve when they step outside their comfort zone. Andreas Lenander was inspired to build something “Bionicle-ish” and I think he nailed it. The contrast in building styles between the complex dragon and the studs-up base is the perfect way to make the dragon stand out.

Jörmungandr - serpent from the deep

The dragon’s neck is particularly well done, being constructed mainly out of robot arms to resemble scales. Robot arms are actually used throughout, also being used for teeth and the tips of the black horns. The Piraka leg pieces are the ideal choice for the ridge of the dragon’s face: they give it that undeniably rigid-skinned lacertilian look.