Tag Archives: Creature

Creepy crawly or fuzzy & fluffly (yes, that’s possible in LEGO), we love our LEGO animals. Check them out here, and fall in love yourself.

Harbinger of the Hunt

This strange being, titled the Harbinger of the Hunt by its builder, rockmonster 2000, paints a haunting figure standing astride the intersection of nature and doom. Appearing to perhaps draw a bit of inspiration from the Witcher 3’s portrayal of a mythological leshen, the horns and digitigrade legs give an eery animalistic style, while being made of simple elements. The oddly shaped head, made from a Hero Factory head turned on end, houses vertical eyes which give this creature a biomechanical look that only serves to make it more uncanny. A final detail not to be missed is the fallen leaves on the podium, made with Friends stars.

Harbinger of the Hunt

Pangohihi powerizer, the beautiful black ray

I came into The Brothers Brick contributor gig knowing I would be challenged to find and write about LEGO creations outside of my comfort zone. What I didn’t expect was how quickly I would fall down the deep rabbit hole of Bionicle creations, and I keep finding myself drawn to Logey Bear’s works, many of which have been featured on TBB in the past (my favorite being Captain Falcon of Nintendo F-Zero fame). His latest model is an oceanic delight, a Bionicle-Galidor hybrid model that barely registered to me as LEGO at first glance. The key component of this radical ray is the pair of “powerizer legs” comprising the front of the beast. The spinal ridge straight through to the tail is also a slick, organic touch.

Pangohihi

Gotta build ’em all

Continuing to show love for Pokémon, Mike Nieves built an adorable LEGO Eevee. Just about everything about his Eevee – the eyes, the color choices, the head tilt, and the fluffy tail – is just so darn cute. The sculpting with rounded slope bricks around Eevee’s neck is particularly lovely.

Pokemon: eevee

If you enjoyed Mike’s Eevee, you may also like his LEGO Arcanine and Rapidash we’ve featured previously.

Simon’s sinuous psychedelic sea serpent

Can you count all the different LEGO colors used in this psychedelic sea serpent by Simon NH? We counted at least 20, but we may have missed some. What’s incredible about this creation is that it uses so many different colors, but still manages to feel coherent and striking. That’s because sets of related colors are grouped strategically: greens are used for the underbelly; lavenders and purples are used for the sides; and reds and pinks are on the top.

Well, here I am, my little one

There’s a lot to love in terms of parts usage too. The use of spring legs on the nose singlehandedly justifies the existence of the oft-maligned LEGO NBA sets for me. Using flags for the spines accentuates the sinuous nature of the whole build. I would love to see an Ultimate Collector’s Series-style set with this level of detail in the LEGO Elves theme.

Gaze of a magnificient Cocaktrice

Builder Timothy Jones brings to life a large Cockatrice in a majestic pose. I’ve since learnt that a Cockatrice is a fictional and mythical beast. It’s supposed to be different parts of a serpent, dragon and rooster all combined together. This does have certain elements of those, and it’s pretty grand with the wings spread out — I’m especially impressed with how it all holds up given the amount of weight those wings must have.

Gaze of the Cockatrice - HD

The Dragon King reigns supreme: this amazing LEGO model of Final Fantasy X’s Bahamut uses over 10,000 pieces

Marius Herrmann used over 10,000 LEGO elements to create this massive model of Bahamut from Final Fantasy X. The so-called dragon king has a wingspan of almost a meter. But most impressively, this stunning creation makes great use of underrepresented colors in the LEGO palette.

Bahamut (from "Final Fantasy X")

Click to see more of Bahamut

Dagon the Great Leviathan strikes a pose!

If you are going to build a giant bubble gum-coloured leviathan, you absolutely want to showcase its serpentine movement. This was builder Jayfa’s intention when designing this mythical beast, which is its second iteration in a quest for greater poseability. Abandoning Bionicle connections for more traditional LEGO bricks and ratchet joints he has created a more substantial looking, fully posable monster that twists and turns without additional support. Add to this some neat part use in the form of the threaded bricks to create its flexed tail, and conical Ninjago hats to suggest cheeks for its maw, and you have a perfectly realised beast.
Dagon
Now that is just showing off!Dagon

Would you dare to join this den of dino-riders?

Some of my fondest childhood memories revolved around dreaming about dinosaurs. In the late 1980s, Tyco indulged me with prehistoric playthings in the form of Dino-Riders, and I pined for a world where I too could ride a triceratops. These memories came flooding back when I saw Jme Wheeler’s series of builds depicting his own dino-riding universe. Jme brings each setting to life with some excellent scenery, but he has also gone one step further by creating backstories for each scene. This particular build depicts the relationship between Gunther the fisherman and Cornelius the Carnosaurus, who was rescued by as a juvenile by a once-lonely Gunther. What’s particularly excellent is how Jme used brick-built water to make it look like Cornelius is drinking water, although I would imagine his presence sends fish into a frenzy.

FB (Low Full)

Click to see the rest of the dino scenes

This prehistoric Polacanthus is dino-mite!

Dinosaurs are the name of the game today at TBB, so let’s take a trip to Western Europe and turn our clocks back to the Cretaceous period, because we’re going on a prehistoric safari to find Polacanthus! Polacanthus is Greek for “many thorns.” Vlad Lisin’s version of the herbivorous dinosaur lives up to its name because it looks quite sharp indeed. A mix of LEGO system and constraction elements are used to achieve a wonderfully organic looking dino. Polancanthus’ head is particularly stunning, thanks in part to a realistic-looking mouth achieved through the use of a battle droid torso and Ninjago snake skull helmet. This behemoth looks prepared to graze through some serious vegetation.

As you explore prehistoric past, don’t miss the fearsome Carnotaurus by Nathan Haseth.

Ogel will mind control you to like this dragonfish!

With Ogel’s mind-controlled army growing by the day, Alpha Team’s chances are looking more and more slim. To make matters worse, Rockmonster 2000 has sided with Ogel to provide him with a mutant dragonfish! Armed with harpoons and an awesomely dated early 2000s slick design, there is nothing that can stop their evil plan to take over the world!

Ogel Deep-Sea Patrol

The build is actually an entry for a Bionicle building competition–as if there were not enough early 2000s style in this creation already–which you can see if you look closely at the parts used. The current round of the competition asks for contestants to build a Bionicle creation capturing a particular theme, and Rockmonster 2000 has done an incredible job with his, since there’s no mistaking the Alpha Team in this one. There are various Bionicle parts, like a kanohi mask, and constraction elements like large claws used across it, sprinkled with just enough System bricks to flow perfectly. Alpha Team is a very nostalgic theme for me personally, but I think we can all agree that this creation is great even without its gloriously ridiculous background!

Chinese dragon is ahead of all others

The key to many LEGO creations is the model’s “face” — be it the head on a mecha, the front grille of a truck, or the pointy end of a starfighter — often when you crack that part of the build, the rest flows into place. And sometimes, if you get the face right, you don’t need anything else at all, as with this wonderful Chinese Dragon by Pol Mac. The dragon’s head is excellent, with smart parts use offering excellent shaping. Don’t miss the intimidating frown from two pearl gold bananas, the use of Chima armour to create the pug-nosed snout, and the spot-on curved jaw created from red flame parts. Yes, sometimes it’s great to see large-scale creatures rendered in their entirety, but sometimes the full model is simply not required.

Chinese red Dragon

Like a fish outta water

Mammals aren’t the only creatures that want to explore environments that are clearly designed to kill them, and this bold fish adventurer is going where no fish has gone before, with the help of a shiny brass mech suit. Built by Andrew Lee, this clawed fish suit is basically an exercise in using the available inventory of pearl gold elements, which is a pretty limited offering, pulling from Hero Factory, the few basic elements that are available, and a variety of minifigure accessories.

Fish Boy!