Tag Archives: Creature

Creepy crawly or fuzzy & fluffly (yes, that’s possible in LEGO), we love our LEGO animals. Check them out here, and fall in love yourself.

Beautiful insects that roam the earth

I can’t remember the last time I saw a butterfly. Then again, I can’t remember the last time I saw a live chicken or cow. Living in the city does have its benefits, but sometimes we forget the beautiful living creatures on mother earth. These three butterflies remind us of how simple things can easily be forgotten in nature and how wonderful LEGO bricks are, how the simplest of things can bring color to remind us of life. Johan Alexanderson didn’t make these random-colored, but instead takes their shape and color from actual butterfly species. The green foliage, though made of seemingly random parts and elements trick my vision into thinking I can almost smell the morning dew.

Butterflies

The slimiest rat on the ship

Slimefoot the Stowaway is a Magic: the Gathering character that is most definetely not a rat, but his presence on an airship must have been much like a cross between a fungal rot and a rat problem with all the little saprolings he spread aboard the Weatherlight. Not sure what a saproling is? Me neither, and to be honest, nobody really knows anything apart from the fact that they are either of plantal or fungal origin and that there is a lot of them. Eero Okkonen has faithfully created Slimefoot and his pals.

Slimefoot, the Stoaway

With a mastery in human shape, Eero has done a great job of capturing what is basically a deformed humanoid with a mushroom top for a head and overgrowth all over his body. The colours are expressive, and the tentacles, while not present on the original art on the card, add a lot to the character and make for a great transition in the neck area. A great addition is all the little saprolings at the mushroom man’s side, whose various shapes really capture the mystical and magical appeal of the original art.

The name’s Jack...Union Jack

Back in 1941, World War II inspired ceramic manufacturer Royal Doulton to release a patriotic bulldog figure. Royal Doulton re-released the bulldog in 2012 to coincide with its appearance in the film, Skyfall. Since LEGO Ideas is currently running a James Bond contest, Victor decided to build a nearly 1:1 scale LEGO version of the bulldog. Victor’s model looks adorable, and the smooth curves of the dog and studs-out sculpting of the flag on his back make for an eye-pleasing juxtaposition.

Royal Doulton Bulldog Union Jack
 

If only all evil spirits were this cute

It is that time of year when many people around the world embrace the spooky and scary, but more often than not combine it with an element of cute. car_mp has captured this unlikely combination perfectly with these two little ghosts.

Little ghosts

The expressive faces (more precisely, holes in the cloth) are done with just a handful of pieces, but somehow this just adds to their charm. The shaping is the star of the show here; the builder uses 1×2 wedge slopes to achieve quite a nice round effect, a technique I expect to become more frequent in the coming years.

One jellyfish that is not quite as squishy

There is no doubt that Moko is one of the best and most prolific LEGO mecha builders out there and this week he brings us a unique tentacle monster, which is also a robot! And it transforms!

MFS-021 Chironex

Both forms of the mech manage to look perfect and menacing. Transforming creations often have to make compromises in one or both of their forms, but this one seems like the bricks were just made for it. The rich purple and translucent purple really make for an evil look and the splashes of blue on some tentacles help break it up a little and add a nice contrast. The dome is obviously the centerpiece of the build, but I also really like the grill tiles used on the inside of the tentacles as visible on the humanoid form, as they help to add a flowing look.

MFS-021 Chironex

Cute kraken is cracking me up

Behold the beast as it rises from the depths! Fear his googly-eyed gaze! Smirk at his cuteness! And bow down before Kelvin Low‘s innovative LEGO parts usage. This giant Kraken menacing a medieval town’s waterfront is a great example of what can be done when imagination meets even the most specialised LEGO pieces. The aquatic monstrosity is built from T-Rex parts! The colours of the dinosaur torso and tails work perfectly as Kraken-skin, and the threatened town is a nice little collection of microscale buildings. This is just plain old good fun with the bricks.

LEGO Kraken

Obey the monolith, slave people of Earth!

From the hands of our otherworldly overlord Rat Dude comes a glorious machine to see our every movement and feel our every emotion, so that we can serve our master with utmost efficiency. Love the Monolith. Trust the monolith. Thought of rebellion is punished by immediate execution.

The builder says that the Monolith’s four mechanical legs each think independently and work together to overcome any terrain and its organic tentacles can feel slaves’ emotions. The sharp angle of the main body reminds its followers of the Monolith’s sharp wit and its white colour of the purity of its purpose–justice. Not only does the glorious Rat Dude bring us a sight of the Monolith, but he even graces us with every aspect of its magnificent construction.

Reverse engineering the LEGO Forma shark with a brick-built “skin”

Last month LEGO revealed Forma, an experimental kinetic sculpture set designed to target the adult market. The product was launched via crowdsourcing platform Indiegogo but is currently only available to buyers in the U.S. and U.K. The product was of interest to Jason Allemann since he enjoys building LEGO kinetic sculptures. Because Jason lives in Canada and is unable to order the Forma set, he decided to reverse-engineer the design well-before its official release!

Swimming Shark

Jason’s shark is more than a direct copy, as it contains his own personal touch. Since the Forma skins are not currently available, Jason created a stunning brick-built skin. The brick-built shark body doesn’t interfere with the model’s functionality and will likely appeal to LEGO fans who were not impressed by Forma’s plastic skins. Jason modified the mechanism to achieve a more realistic swimming motion, and the lower level consists of a small school of fish swimming beneath the shark. Finishing off the entire model is an attractive coral reef base, which offers a nice splash of color.

Mew gave birth. We named the new Pokémon Mewtwo

Whether Mewtwo or Lukatwo is a good name for a baby is an open parenting debate, but DanielBrickSon‘s LEGO Mewtwo is a powerful and undebatably expertly built. In public perception, this Pokémon has a strange place. Die-hard fans will love it, but people with passing interest in the franchise may be scratching their heads, as it was difficult to obtain in the games and was a plot device in a few episodes of the anime, as opposed as some better known Pokémon (looking at you, Pikachu!), which were proper characters.

Mewtwo_2

Daniel has captured Mewtwo’s curved shapes perfectly, using constraction armor parts and round system elements. The purple stripe and tail deserve some attention, as the curve on the belly appears to be made out of Bionicle masks. The build is mostly Bionicle and constraction based, but includes just enough System bricks like minifig helmets and horn pieces, to smooth out some rough edges. The builder even added some light-up features to make Mewtwo’s psychic attacks even more intimidating.

Mewtwo_6

The gelatinous wonder from space

We may sound like broken records here at The Brothers Brick every year when SHIPtember rolls around, but I really do believe that spaceships people build are getting more and more imaginative. Inthert‘s contribution to this year’s event is a prime example of that.

Pleurotus Flight - Poster Shot

The spaceship looks almost alive, like a mix between a jellyfish, a mushroom and pure mechanical evil. Shapes are nothing LEGO bricks naturally support, but the builder has managed not only to make the dome at the front look good but also to make it open, with a beautiful mechanical interior. General consensus for conservative spaceship colour schemes suggests fewer colours used, carefully separated by clean lines, but somehow Inthert has managed to make his build look great even with multiple grays, black, brown, gold and green used in very intense combinations. The secret here is that each colour has a strongly defined role and makes sense in the build. As far as details go I could not even begin to cover all the ingenious little parts, but my favourite by far is the central section, where mechanical tentacles can be seen through transparent panels.

Pleurotus Flight - Open Dome

Now you see it. Now you don’t. Voltron’s green lion is in its element.

If you are a huge fan of the Voltron LEGO set, you might also be interested in the “Form Your Most Imaginative Voltron Scene!” contest on LEGO Ideas. The contest has produced some excellent entries, such as aido k’s breathtaking tribute to the green lion, “In its Element.” The entire scene is comprised of an excellent likeness of the lion’s head, which is split into mechanical and organic halves.

In Its Element

See more of this custom LEGO Voltron model

Creature from the Brick Lagoon

Logey Bear’s latest LEGO build was inspired by the Creature from the Black Lagoon and includes a number of scary-good part choices. Front and center is an alien clinger from the Alien Conquest theme bringing fun curvy details to the face. It pairs exceptionally well with the minifigure arms that surround the eyes. A pair of bigfig arms are cleverly used as upper legs and several pairs of flippers are used for the webbed feet and gills.

Gill Man