Tag Archives: Insects

This fly guy is a one cool samurai

It would probably not be a good idea to swat insects in front of this character! Sandro Quattrini has created this unique looking build of a humanoid fly in samurai clothing. There are some fantastic details in the design such as a statuette trophy at the centre of the chest, moustache pieces portraying defined muscles and a castle helmet at the end of the torso. Large plant pieces form the bands around the arms which are primarily made up of inversed tire pieces. The tips of the fingers and toes use minifigure hands to provide the character with an extra hairy feel. Things might be the other way around if you confronted this fly, most likely you’d be the one buzzing off!

Fly Samurai

Will you find this magnificent insectoid creeping around in your garden?

LEGO builder Djokson has constructed this model of a striking white insectoid. The creature has a spindly frame, with thin arms and legs, however there is a sense of a threatening aura in those gleaming red eyes. The magnificent crown of horns on its head implies that this creature is the leader of a hive and even looks as though it could have potential for being a type of Pokémon, I’d want one on my team! One of the most interesting techniques used is the application of handcuffs to create the chest as they are stacked up and placed on horn pieces.

Dissector Dam'nakk

The cicada has one crazy summer

Cicadas are interesting in the sense that they spend most of their lives buried underground then emerge as horny, loud, unruly teenagers. Kinda like all those summer camp movies from the 80s. The sound these insects make is unmistakable and to LEGO builder Thomas Jenkins that distinctive sound means summer. This creature is chock full of nice parts usage including an inside-out tire comprising the thorax and a Constraction figure torso used as the abdomen. With the signature red eyes, the wings, and the stance, the end result bears an uncanny resemblance to the real thing.

While their legendary mating calls may be loud and their parties wild and unruly, the cicada lives its life above ground for only a couple of weeks, a month at most. Then they all end up looking quite like this. Fast times indeed.

The Battle of Drumstick Glade

As you know over at The Brothers Brick, we love a good brick build insect. And this LEGO creation by Ted Andes features a lot of them! The ants are completely brick build. They are made out of droid arms, clip claws, t-bars, and bricks with studs on 4 sides. They even have a small gaster made out of tooth plates. We are currently watching a battle between the Blackthorns and the Lavender Leaf ant clans. My bet is the Blackthorns are the black ants and the grey ants are the Lavender Leafs. They are fighting over a half-eaten pheasant leg on the ground. I’ve seen a lot of uses for the curved tapered panel but I’ve never seen it used as a pheasant leg. For the foliage, it looks like Ted dismembered a bunch of LEGO flower bouquets. Which seems like a good cause in this case.

"The Battle of Drumstick Glade"

The Blue Beetle Brigade

Grant Davis must know I am partial to a good brick-built insect. It is my dream to one day have framed Entomology display made entirely out of LEGO bricks. Now all I have to do is convince my partner that this is suitable decoration for a living room. These wonderful bugs by Grant might help me convince him. The body of the beetle is build using the vehicle spoiler for the antennas Grant used minifigure whips. There is an interesting mixture of brown parts used in the making of the branch. The flower on the branch must be some sort of parasitic plant species because it looks like it is not part of the branch itself. The eggs used for flowers petals is a very lovely touch and the presentation of this creation is simply sublime.

The Blue Beetle Brigade

Crushing it in cross-species cross-fit training

Restrictions on many of our usual weekend activities are finally starting to lift as more and more people around the world get their vaccination shots. But what do you do if cross-fit gyms just don’t come in your size? Improvise! Bart De Dobbelaer demonstrates the importance of using a spotter when lifting weights, or in this case, an exceedingly large caterpillar. It might be hard to tell, with so many black parts, but all three of the ants are quite expressive, including the poor fellow trapped beneath his living dumbbell.

Ant weight lifting competition ... gone wrong

Man, this thing is seriously buggy

If you spend any time working on a computer, and let’s face it, we all spend more time on computers than usual these days, you’ve probably experienced the occasional glitch with your graphics card. I think that Ivan Martynov may have discovered the real cause of all those graphic glitches. This dark and colorful critter is snacking on a graphic card, and by the look of it, he’s going to do some damage. Aside from the many printed tiles used on the computer module, I love the use of a Creeper face from the Minecraft theme.

Graphic Bug

A beetle with a bit of style

Japanese tiger beetles are one of the coolest bugs on the planet. Not only is this epic predator shrouded in a rainbow, but it also sprints the equivalent of a human ultramarathon every day. It’s one of the fastest-running critters out there. I certainly wouldn’t want to mess with those mandibles either. Takamichi Irie is known for his exceptional LEGO beetles, and this is one of his best. The body shape and mosaic-like exoskeleton really make it stand out and come to life.

Tiger Beetle

Takamichi’s unique style involves the use of loads of minifigure hands. You have to wonder how he gets them. Does he have a hundred poor minifigs without hands, or does he get them in bulk? Maybe our past interview with him will shed a little light on his work.

A bug that keeps changing with the times

It’s always fun when LEGO builders… well… build on each other. CB Phase 4Marin Stipkovic‘s latest entry for Mech Monday, is a new “final form” for the evolving Cobalt Bug concept created by Markus Rollbühler almost exactly a year ago. Times, they are a changin’. There are a lot of great details in this latest evolution to enjoy.  Those basketball netting engine cowlings are a lot of fun, as are the ski pole feet. The orange spike proboscis is smile-worthy, too.

Mech Monday #47: CB Phase 4

If you want even more juicy views of this mech, check out the 360 degree rotation Marin shared on Flickr. I can’t wait to see if we get a ultimate-final form version next year!

Nightmarish creature will stomp on you

In case you ever wondered what would result if a scorpion and a spider got freaky and produced something even freakier, wonder no more. This nightmarish creation by Ivan Martynov reveals the result. While the legs might look a bit spindly, make no mistake, this creature is not to be trifled with.

Spider of Leng

Sleep tight, and don’t let the bed bugs bite

If you don’t really think about it, the nursery rhyme is harmless enough. But if you stop for a second to ponder, or maybe say it in a less sweet, sing-song tone, it becomes the stuff of nightmares. What if they really did come to bite in the middle of the night? And perhaps, as is the case with this poor fellow built by Water Snap, what if the bite mutates you? We’re not talking Spiderman here! I’m thinking more along the lines of The Metamorphosis, which the builder confirms in his description quoting protagonist Gregor Samsa.  Yikes… But I digress. This giant LEGO bug employs some nice parts usage, and shaping. I particularly like the way it looks as if it’s sitting up in the bed, observing its altered limbs for the first time.

If you’d like to see more crawly critters, check out our insect archives.

The delicate, dappled wings of spring

In the northern hemisphere, spring is underway. It might not feel that way for some, as snow is still falling in parts, but it is indeed springtime. And what says springtime better than a butterfly? Maybe flowers, but flowers need pollinators like butterflies, and so the two go hand in hand. Or proboscis in nectar pit, as the case may be. So when the Style it Up contest gave the prompt to build something with LEGO that is perfectly symmetrical across a line, I (Benjamin Stenlund) eventually settled on a Monarch butterfly, one of the most recognizable insects in North America. Ok, I admit, my wife told me to make a butterfly.

Monarch Butterfly

The challenge, of course, is trying to replicate the complicated patterns on the wings, with their many angles and colors, all while using a mostly rectangular system of interlocking bricks. I found that the old fingered hinges were better than the newer clip hinges, as they are flat, so I was thankful to have my childhood LEGO laying about. An even greater challenge than the building was photographing it without glare, as the flat surfaces reflected everything. But the end result, in my not-so-humble opinion, is delicately beautiful.