Tag Archives: Roman

How many LEGO studs can you spot?

The everyday objects built with LEGO bricks can be a visual eye-candy, especially when it’s built to perfection. How many LEGO studs can you spot in this creation? Yes, go, right now, count them all before you read this article to the end. There’s a sense of ASMR even though this is a static image built by Roman. My eyes just want to gloss all overlooking for imperfections in arrangement and alignment and how they all fit together almost naturally. And, just in case you thought you found it all, don’t forget to count the one on the door knocker built with the Yellow Lantern piece smacked right in the center!

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Armor up for your holiday shopping

We all know that shopping for that perfect gift can be a real nightmare. Sure, shopping online has made things a lot nicer. But sometimes you still have to go out into the crowds and fight hand-to-hand for those discounted LEGO sets that you a loved one really wants. It can be hazardous, particularly if someone else tries to shove you out of the way. So why not take some precautions? For example, you could don the wearable Roman Centurion armor that Amado Canlas Pinlac created.
Built from an interlocking mesh of ball-jointed plates, it’s the rich colors and decoration that really make this a stand-out piece of art. Dark red 2×2 tiles resonate well with a myriad of gold elements. There are plant stems, rounded tiles, and even carriage wheels.
Roman Centurion Armor
Repeated blocks of curved slopes feature heavily on the shoulders and back. Golden window lattices and minifigure weapons help define geometric patterns on the rear as well.
Roman Centurion Armor
Okay, maybe this isn’t something that would be super-practical to wear while fighting for bargains. But I bet if you did, it would be a huge distraction to the other shoppers. And while they’re asking “how long did it take you to make that?” you can make off with all the best sets. Victory is assured!

You can read our interview with Amado here.

As above, so below

In 73 B.C., the overlords of Capua conduct a slave trade in the town center but below, among the rats and stench, escaped slaves plan their counterattack. That is the scene depicted here by Hunter Erickson. This build was influenced by the TV show Spartacus, particularly the beginning of season 3, Hunter tells us. He goes on to say that the show itself isn’t entirely accurate so further research as to what life may have been like in Capua was needed in order reign in some realistic details. The rough stucco feel of the walls are an excellent touch as well as the terracotta roofs and small arched windows, all reflect the specific feel of an ancient Roman city. Call me weird, but my favorite feature has to be the river of green sludge flowing through the sewer. Let’s just hope that one guy washes his hands before eating that giant baguette.

Roman Capua, 73 B.C.

Ambush on the Roman road

Sure, those Romans were tough enough when massed in their Legions. But catch them isolated from the main army? In a small group? On a lonely stretch of forest road? Let’s see how tough they are then. That appears to be what Jesse van den Oetelaar is asking in this LEGO scene depicting a trio of unsuspecting Legionaries about to walk into a Barbarian ambush. The irregular base and the greenery are the stars of the show here, with an impressive mix of shrubbery and foliage providing cover for the Barbarian assailants. It’s worth a close look at some of the techniques involved, and the mix of earthy colours deployed — this is a great example of how to build realistic undergrowth in LEGO.

LEGO Legions Romans Battle

The city of Cyrene falls to the Pierian Empire

Despite the inclusion of Classical or Greco-Roman characters in several waves of Collectible Minifigures, the ancient world just isn’t as popular with LEGO Castle builders as the big gray castles of the medieval era. As a result, it’s always refreshing to see great LEGO models from that earlier era. Talented TBB alum Mark Erickson has created a fictional battle between rivals the Pierian Empire and the great city of Tylis. Mark’s diorama is full of fantastic architectural detail — I particularly love the contrast between the tan city walls and the shining white temple with its gold details and green roof.

The Fall of Cyrene

See more of Mark’s fantastic Greco-Roman city

Are you not entertained?

The custom Brickhead models just keep coming! I am glad to see that the latest LEGO building trend to make custom versions of the popular Brickheadz line is not limited to pop-culture like Star Wars and Marvel. This Roman centurion by Koen demonstrates some very nice parts usage. From the mini-fig spear and shield to an assortment of recently released curved and angled tile elements. And don’t miss the gold printed Wonder Woman tile! The curved fan on the helmet really completes the look.

BrickHeadz: Centurion

Et tu, Brute?

Beware the Ides of March – so warned the soothsayer in Julius Caesar of the traitorous act committed on the 15th of March, 44 B.C.E. Performed by Marcus Brutus, made infamous by William Shakespeare, the betrayal is now immortalized in LEGO by legophthalmos. The builder has chosen the perfect expressions to represent the characters: Caesar appears regal and pensive while Brutus looks devious and cunning. With Senators looking grim as they rush towards them with swords drawn and the Roman guard running towards the fracas in very soft focus, there’s no mistaking the inevitable conclusion.

Ides of March - 44 B.C.

Incredible LEGO Roman Temple of Minerva with parading legionaries

Antonio Cerretti has brought a marvel of the ancient world to the brick with this stunning Roman temple and courtyard. When many of us LEGO fans saw the Roman soldiers in the collectible minifigures lines, we envisioned a scene like this with legionaries standing in formation before their eagle, perhaps just returned from a campaign in Gaul or Africa. But although I’ve seen a few impressive Roman armies so far, it’s Antonio’s masterful recreation of Roman architecture that sets this model apart. The pure white marble columns and reliefs are beautiful, and the sheer scale of the temple and courtyard is amazing — over five feet in length and featuring around 130 minifigures.

tempio 2

panoramica

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Comic book classix in brix

Probably better known to our European readers, Asterix the Gaul was a beloved French comic book series that started over half a century ago, and has since been translated into many languages and adapted to both animation and live action formats. It tells the story of the last remaining village in ancient Gaul to hold out against the invading Roman Empire, thanks to the leadership of the titular hero, Asterix.

Flick member IamKritch has faithfully recreated Asterix, his boulder-tossing sidekick Obelix, and Obelix’s faithful hound Dogmatix (aka Idéfix) out of LEGO. The use of mini-fig wings on Asterix’s helmet is ingénieux, while the use of joystick levers and grills for the eyes (instead of using a Sharpie, like I would have) is très puriste!