About Chris Doyle

Chris has been involved in many parts of the LEGO community for over twenty years, and has been building most of his life. A love of transparent bricks and pop culture combine in most of his creations, which tend to be pretty large scale. His website, Reasonably Clever, featured one of the longest running brick-based webcomics, as well as one of the first LEGO-themed avatar creators. His photographs and creations have appeared in several books.

Posts by Chris Doyle

LEGO Marvel Spider-Man 76178 Daily Bugle (Part 2: The minifigures) [Review]

The newest set in the LEGO Spider-Man lineup is also the largest. Revealed just today, Marvel 76178 Daily Bugle includes 3,772 pieces and will be available for US $299.99 | CAN $399.99 | UK £274.99 from LEGO Stores and LEGO.com from May 26 for LEGO VIP members and June 1, 2021 for all. We’ve already taken a look at the rest of the set’s contents in Part 1 of our review, and now it’s time to explore the full cast of twenty-five minifigures.  Come along as we find out the who’s who of new and returning characters!

The LEGO Group provided The Brothers Brick with an early copy of this set for review. Providing TBB with products for review guarantees neither coverage nor positive reviews.

Click to read the full hands-on review

LEGO Marvel Spider-Man 76178 Daily Bugle (Part 1: The build) [Review]

LEGO has spent a lot of time exploring the Spider-Verse. From Monster Trucks to the Spider-Cave(!?), we’ve seen a lot of key characters and locations. One, though, was notable for its absence — the Daily Bugle. Now that lack has been addressed, and in a big, big way, as today we’re able to reveal that the newest set in the LEGO Spider-Man lineup is also the largest. Marvel 76178 Daily Bugle includes 3,772 pieces and will be available for US $299.99 | CAN $399.99 | UK £274.99 from LEGO Stores and LEGO.com from May 26 for LEGO VIP members and June 1, 2021 for all. This huge set includes a whopping twenty-five minifigures, two vehicles, and the eponymous skyscraper.

There’s a ton of details to explore—in fact, so much that we’ve split this review in two. In this first part we’ll focus on the build, while in the second part we’ll go through the whole cast of minifigures in detail. So come along as we take an early, in-depth look at building this huge range-topping set.

The LEGO Group provided The Brothers Brick with an early copy of this set for review. Providing TBB with products for review guarantees neither coverage nor positive reviews.

Click to read the full hands-on review

This frog is a (paper) cut above the rest

When it comes to mixed-media LEGO creations, we can all take a page from takamichi irie.
The papercraft body of this amphibian draws the eye, while the friendly smile and cherry-based toes  showcase just what plastic can do.  Inspired by a calendar page, this model brings joy to even the most dreary day.

Frog

The underside shows off more of the traditional “LEGO construction” in play. Clever use of  minifigure posing stands attach the rear legs at an unusual angle, and rounded 1×2 modified plate gives the front legs articulation, too. Frog

If you find this frog as adorable as I do, you’ll want to check out some of Takamichi’s other paper-LEGO hybrids, a crab and a bull. Or maybe explore the full range of his creations we’ve featured previously.

If you care to step outside, there’s work to do

Life in space sounds fun, but there’s still work to be done. Tino Poutiainen shows us a slice of orbital life in Starboard drydock, complete with a complex clump of technology and a cleverly constructed astronaut. Standout details include the layered helmets, flex tube arms, and astromech head incorporated into the backpack. The satellite is super swanky, too, with an interesting hinged cover for the electronics. The organic curves from the string elements add just a touch of weightlessness to the scene as well.

Starboard drydock

Tino is no stranger to sharing cool space-themed builds, but my favorite creation of theirs is the  more fantastic Glass Cerebus. What’s your pick?

You wanted a CD player for your speeder bike, right?

There’s creative part usage, then there’s what Mitch Phillips has accomplished with Frequency Clipper.  You might recognize that old-school Insectoids wing at the rear, or the Hero Factory shoulder armor on the sides. But the key feature has to be that Bionicle Borahk CD-ROM at the front. Talk about taking your tunes wherever you go…

Frequency Clipper

In the mood for more great Speeder Bikes? Cruise our archives for more creative builds!

This is the way you build a bigger cradle

What do you do when you really want a plush LEGO Baby Yoda but can’t seem to justify it? Do what Simon Liu did – buy it anyway and build a to-scale cradle to go with it. Of course, you might need some other hard-to-find LEGO elements like sails from Jabba’s barge, but it’s a small price to pay for an upscale ride for your snuggly little pal.

Baby Yoda Cradle

This isn’t the first Baby Yoda build we’ve featured, and I’d be shocked if it was the last. And hopefully, we’ll see more that make use of the plush version of the character. Surely someone is working on a Razor Crest that’s to scale, right? (Well, we can dream.)

A flying Flying V? That’s unexpected.

The Cyber Metal 2, a speeder bike with some highly unusual styling, is a fun creation from Julius Kanand.  Sure, you’ve probably heard of Flying V guitars, but how do you like this flying Flying V? I’m particularly fond of the transparent bright green accents, the speaker cones that double as thrusters, and the use of 1×1 round speaker tiles. Part Doof Wagon, part Star Wars, this build is music to our ears.

Cyber Metal 2
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LEGO Botanical Collection 10289 Bird of Paradise: April showers bring May flowers [Review]

Let’s start things out right with a few floral puns, shall we? LEGO has been branching out into new themes lately. Introduced in late 2020, the Botanical Collection has already taken root with amazing sets like the 10280 Flower Bouquet and the 10281 Bonsai Tree. It was a pretty safe bet that we’d see more growth in this area, and now we know what it is! The 1173 piece 10289 Botanical Collection: Bird Of Paradise will  retail for US $99.99 | CAN $139.99 | UK £89.99 starting June 1 in Europe and the rest of the world, and August 1 in the Americas. I know you’re just budding with excitement, so let’s take a closer look!

The LEGO Group provided The Brothers Brick with an early copy of this set for review. Providing TBB with products for review guarantees neither coverage nor positive reviews.

Click to read the full hands-on review

Mission Impossible: Prospector Edition

With a skillful use of only 101 elements, Markus Rollbühler takes a deep dive into adventure with 101 Bricks: Dangerous Descent. There are tons fun details, but did you recognize the rocky Bionicle baseplates (turned on their side) that form the walls? I also love the use of monochrome minifigures as carved statues in the background. Looks like there’s some history behind the golden T-Rex. (Hold on. How did an ancient culture know about T-Rexes? Man, this build is just full of mysteries.)

101 Bricks: Dangerous Descent

This build is actually a continuation of the story Markus started in 101 Bricks: Discovery. The part limit comes from the RogueOlympics, a contest that has lead to a lot of great featured builds. Check our archives out for more compact goodness from the event!

Forget dragons. Imagine wagons.

There are LEGO builds that hit that sweet spot of nostalgia and realism, and this little red wagon from Ted Andes is one of the great ones. The highlight has to be those great wheels – 3×3 dishes rimmed with a rubber tire, complete with a 1×1 round plate cap. The thin rods for the axles and handle are also perfectly scaled, making this look like a product shot from a retro-toy catalog.

Little Red Wagon

Ted is an expert at creative part usage and unusual builds, as you can see if you take a trip through our archives.

Some perspectives don’t feel forced at all

What’s that off in the distance? Cecilie Fritzvold has created a beautiful view of a distant bridge, or maybe a nearby view of a model train set. It’s hard to say for sure, but this stellar mix of textures and techniques is certainly satisfying to look at. I love how the fence along the left side of the scene, and that second lamp post, drop down to create the illusion of a hill leading down to the bay. The bridge itself also merits a closer look, being constructed from the rather unusual Large Figure Part Shield Holder with Axle.  (That choice of part was no accident, as this is one of Cecile’s entries into the latest Iron Builder contest, which focuses on creative use of that very element.)

With a view

Making bridges out LEGO can be a challenging task. Check our our archives to see how other builders solved that problem.  

An artistic stretch of buildings dedicated to the arts

Microscale buildings can be a challenge to design, but Luis Peña knows just how to make them sizzle. Inspired by the architectural work of Santiago Calatrava and Oscar Niemeyer, the custom buildings in Opera and Museum are filled with unusual elements and a ton of class. My favorite touches are the Mysterio Helmet orb/sculpture, and the Web-effect railings on the bridge. The curves from the balloon panels create a great sense of motion for the scene, too.

Opera and Museum (LEGO Architecture Project)

If tiny buildings are your thing, take a stroll through our archives for even more compact goodness.