Tag Archives: Ford

If you can’t beat ’em... Re-build ’em

As much as I like LEGO’s current crop of Creator 3-in-1 sets, I have fond memories as a child of building Creator and Designer sets that sometimes had instructions for 8 or 9 different builds. I wonder if Firas Abu-Jaber has the same longing… Not content with re-shaping 10295 Creator Expert Porsche 911 into a Corvette Stingray, Lamborghini Countach and a Porsche 911 Turbo S, his latest iteration of the set has turned out a gorgeous Ford GT40 MkI.

LEGO Ford GT40 MK1 10295

The GT40 is famous for winning the prestigious 24 Hours of Le Mans race four times on the bounce, and the model depicted here is the Mark I which achieved the feat in ’68 and ’69. Confusingly, those came after the MkII and MkIV victories, while the poor MkIII never got a look in as a road car! The MkI wins were closely fought with Porsche, who would go on to dominate endurance racing, so there’s a hint of irony that this Ford is repurposed from the German marque. Not that you would know it from looking at it – I did a double-take when I read the description. I mean, it’s even got a fully-fledged interior and engine!

LEGO Ford GT40 MK1 10295

So counting the 911 Targa, I make that a 6-in-1 set so far… Here’s hoping we get to see more re-imaginings from Firas soon!

All aboard the Boo Boo Bus

Were it not for the sirens and lights on the roof, I would have assumed this LEGO Ford Econoline van by Isaac Wilder was just a regular van with a cool stripe on it (you know, for speed). In fact, this is a model of a conversion from van to ambulance (Vanbulance?), dubbed the Collins Crusader or, more affectionately, the ‘Boo Boo Bus’ – which is a name I will start using more often now I’ve heard it!

1972 Collins “Crusader” Type-II Ambulance

Isaac is no stranger when it comes to the superb shaping of vehicles, and while one would think a van’s boxy shape would lend itself easily to a rendition in LEGO bricks, the various pieces pointing in different directions here show it can be deceptively complex. So much so that a few cut decals have been used to pull off some of the more minute details such as the red stripe and A-pillars. There’s no doubt that the effect is well worth the effort though!

This is not the first 1972 Econoline he’s built, either – the first one having been modified from a LEGO Avengers set. It’s always nice to see builders revisit their previous models, especially when the result is this good!

McLaren’s GT for the win

The 24 Hours of Le Mans is an automotive endurance race that tests the limits of cars and their teams. Highlighted in the film Ford v Ferrari, the race challenges teams to beat the competition by going the farthest within 24 hours instead of getting to a finish line first. Speed and reliability were crucial factors that led this notable design to victory, though Ford forcing Ken Miles to slow down helped. This model by KMP MOCs pays homage to the 1966 winner, by technicality, the Ford GT40 Mk2 driven by Bruce McLaren. The white circle and hood stripe nicely contrasts with the black body of the rest of the car. Gotta love those rounded 1×1 plates for their utility in design. The builder also makes use of new Speed Champions pieces and techniques to achieve a smooth, 8-stud wide design for this iconic car.

LEGO 42126 Technic Ford F-150 Raptor unveiled [News]

We get an early look at a set from the new wave of Technic sets for the second half of 2021 with a Ford collaboration. The  42126 Techni Ford F-150 Raptor is listed on Walmart and retailing for USD 99 with 1379 Pieces. There is no indication of when the set will be available for order.

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First look at the 2021 LEGO Speed Champions lineup featuring Toyota, Ford, Dodge and more [News]

German retailer JB Spielwaren reveals six new sets featuring 9 new vehicles to be added to the Speed Champions lineup for 2021. The new sets are expected to be released on June 1st 2021.

Click to take a closer look at the new Speed Champions 2021 sets

From one American legend to another

After a lukewarm reception when the LEGO Aston Martin DB5 came out, we were all pretty thrilled when the same LEGO designer debuted the 10265 Ford Mustang. With versatile styling and a striking color scheme, it was a nearly flawless set that depicts a classic American icon. LEGO automotive builder Firas Abu-Jaber takes the very same pieces from that set and converts it into another symbol of American ingenuity, the Ford F-150 Raptor Supercab. He even gives it a custom stars-and-stripes Ford logo across the grille. Like all of Firas’ work, this model has opening doors and a fully detailed engine. Firas by now is a LEGO automotive legend. Here’s why.

Ford F150 Raptor Supercab

A line of Econolines (and A-100’s)

In the mid-fifties Volkswagen imported their microbus into the US and Americans were immediately smitten. The forward-cab shape offered practicality, utilitarianism, and unbridled fun in one fell swoop, and Ford, Dodge, and GMC quickly took notice. Clearly, this phenomenon has not been lost on LEGO builder Chris Vesque as he presents a series of five 60’s era Ford Econolines (teardrop headlights) and Dodge A-100’s (round headlights). He starts us off with a stock Ford Econoline pickup. This configuration offers a full 7 1/2 feet of loading capacity.

60s Ford Econoline PickUp

I can assure you the next four get wilder from here so… Continue reading

A lady and her hot rod

As a car nut, nothing makes my heart go pitter-patter more than a sweet custom hot rod. That’s why when I saw Sara Nelson’s LEGO classic custom Ford I paid extra-special attention, with the heart pittering and whatnot. With its removed fenders, lowered stance, ’34 Ford grille, and bold black and red color scheme, this is your quintessential car show favorite. Sara cites the work of Brothers Brick regular Letranger Absurde as her inspiration for the character and, now that she mentions it, I can see the influence there. There isn’t an archive to refer you to so this means Sara is new to our radar but someone we will certainly be on the lookout for in the future. In the meantime, buckle in and check out the archive of vehicles from other amazing builders.

Ready to Race!

Mad Max’s V8 Interceptor rides again

This sweet ride by Michael Kanemoto is looking mean in a way only classic muscle cars can. The black beast is a LEGO Technic scale recreation of Mad Max’s 1973 Ford Falcon, which is of course heavily modified and redubbed the V8 Interceptor. It appears here as it did in 1982’s Mad Max 2: Road Warrior, with massive fuel tanks mounted in back.

V8 Interceptor

Click to see more of the V8 Interceptor

An oldie but a goodie

Classic car season has just passed, and most owners of these oldies have presumably tucked them away safely into garages until summer rolls around again. Lucky for us every season is LEGO season and we can always check out some brick-built classic beauties like this 1940 Ford Coupe built by Isaac.

1940 Ford Coupe

Isaac renders the sleek body of the Coupe using some bricks and a lot of slopes and tiling – all in black. The grill vent panels in the front of the vehicle are astutely comprised of technic gears and the windshield is minimally rendered with black antenna levers going up into the roof of the car. Isaac also cleverly uses grey minifigure hands to style the back bumper of the vehicle. Overall I would say this model is a pretty accurate recreation of the old school automobile, and it certainly gives us something to look at while indoor season in many places around the world begins.

Not the first rodeo for this Bronco

There is a golden rule of vehicles: If it exists in real life, then it exists as someone’s LEGO creation. This medium-sized Technic off-roader by Anton Kablash is a model of a car that does not exist… yet. A recently announced next-generation Ford Bronco, set to release in 2021, is a modern take on a classic SUV. While retaining its iconic boxy shape, the new model has a futuristic take on the front grille and headlights of the original vehicle. Anton captures the design with pinpoint accuracy using mostly Technic parts with a few of the usual plates, slopes, and tiles thrown in between.

Ford Bronco

As with the real vehicle, I am drawn to the simple, minimalist design of this vehicle. The clean lines form a box that is aesthetically pleasing rather than boring. The only curves are where it matters – the wheel arches and the frame around the headlights. My favourite is the hood, which Anton constructed from tiles and curved slopes rather than Technic parts. The windows and roof in black offer a nice contrast from the white body, and I particularly like the inclusion of mounted spotlights.

Underneath a clean white livery with openable doors, hood, and trunk, there are as many functions as a large-scale supercar. The working steering connects to both a steering wheel and a “hand of god” gear on the roof. The rear wheel connects to an inline four-cylinder engine in the front, and all the wheels have high-clearance suspension. On top of it all, the chassis and exterior are separate modules.

What the crazy European kids were into

When I think of my childhood the Ford Pinto comes to mind. That’s because we had one when I was growing up and apparently Dad thought nothing of our safety. But across the pond, LEGO builder Jonathan Elliott tells us that during his childhood, the Mk1 Ford Transit was the ubiquitous thing in the United Kingdom as well as Germany, Belgium, and Holland. It’s still a Ford but apparently far less explosive. In fact, the Ford Transit is so revered out there that the platform is still used today in everything from school buses to police and ambulance applications. Jonathan replicated the shape nicely with this little build proving you don’t need a vanload of pieces to create an accurate LEGO model.

Early Ford Transit