Tag Archives: Ford

Yes, you CAN take it all with you!

We would have been totally impressed with just a LEGO Ford pickup. Really, we would have. But colognebrick went the extra mile and added a stunning fifth-wheel camper and now we’re in awe. This is what the world could be like if we had a wide-open road and unlimited time and gas money. The possibilities are endless! It makes your heart go pitter-patter, doesn’t it? I should get on the horn with Brothers Brick brass to see if we have it in our budget to get a real truck and camper like this one. We could use it as a mobile headquarters for…you know…article writing and stuff. I really like the gray and blue stripe along the side. The trailer’s color scheme and the “Wildlife Caravans” stickers comes from this set. But if that wasn’t impressive enough, the sides expand out, and the camper has a fully detailed interior.

Ford pick up with fifth wheel camper

Here’s some of the inside.

Livingroom with open kitchen

Guys, come on. Seriously, do we have the budget for this? It’ll be like the Batmobile except for less crime-fighting and more sightseeing. Andrew? Chris? Brothers Brick road trip? Anyone?

Transformation of the Ford Mustang to the Tesla Cybertruck

What I love about LEGO is the ability to build anything you can dream of. What sets apart talented builders such as Gerald Cacas to mortal set builders like me is the skills to just use pieces from a particular set, in this case, the official LEGO 10265 Ford Mustang set, and turn it into the Tesla Cybertruck!

Cybertruck: alternate build. for the Ford Mustang set ????????

And if that wasn’t enough, this alternate build has doors that open and a (modified) trunk that seems a bit more practical than the original. Elon Musk may want to consider a blue paint job as an offering as it doesn’t look too bad from the unpainted metal skin showcased at the unveiling. Is that enough to tempt you into giving it a go? Grab yours at LEGO Online stores if you don’t already own the Mustang.

Cybertruck: alternate build. for the Ford Mustang set ????????

Santa’s ’40 Ford Coupe is the alternative to traditional science.

It’s been proven by…um…science or something that Santa travels the world via a sleigh and eight tiny reindeer named Dasher, Dancer and…um…Vomit and Nixon, maybe? I don’t know, it’s been awhile since my last science class so I’m a little rusty on the names and how it all works. But that doesn’t stop builders like Isaac W. from defying traditional science and going with alternate forms of transportation such as this chopped ’40 Ford Coupe. As a diehard car dude, I am all about this sleek, top-fueled alternate ride!

Santa's chopped '40 Ford Coupe

Now I’m aware that the ’40 Ford Coupe has fairly ample trunk space but I have a thirst for toys as big as the Colorado Rockies. How does Santa accommodate the likes of me? As stated earlier, it has been awhile since science class but I know enough about science to realize it’s going to take a lot more than a coupe trunk to get toys to all the good children of the world. Thankfully, Isaac already has that solution figured out with this matching trailer. Isn’t science grand?

Santa's chopped '40 Ford Coupe

It’s time to pick up the Ford Mustang set, thanks to this alt build

LEGO Creator Expert’s latest vehicle, 10265 Ford Mustang, is one of the best vehicles LEGO has made. But Nathanael Kuipers decided to use the parts from the set to build another stunning vehicle, this beautiful classic pickup. With the clean lines and split grille that marked the Ford F100 trucks of the early 70s, it’s remarkable that every element in this truck came from a single copy of the Mustang. Now that LEGO has moved away from cars with a Volkswagen Camper Van and a Technic Range Rover Defender, maybe they’ll turn an eye to gorgeous trucks like this, too.

Pickup Truck

Get ready for a family vacation road trip, LEGO style

If you are looking for great LEGO models of cars in a 1:1 scale to the LEGO Minifig, look no further than these two classic automobiles by Mateusz Waldowski. At first glance, it would be easy to mistake these dual versions of the 1970s Ford Granada MK1 for die-cast Hotwheels. From the smoothly curved hoods to the white stripes made from official sticker material, there’s not a visible stud to be seen. One of my favorite details is the little tab sticking out for each door handle. (See if you can figure out how they did it.) And that luggage rack is ready for the Griswolds to load up for their family vacation.

Win the 24 Hours of Le Mans with this 1968 Ford GT40 Mk1 in gorgeous Gulf livery

As much as the LEGO Speed Champions 1966 Ford GT40 remains one of my favorites of the theme, it’s always been disappointing that LEGO has not been able to release one in the iconic Gulf Oil livery, for the very reasonable reason that LEGO does not have a licensing deal with Gulf Oil. But LEGO fans like Jonathan Elliott have stepped into the light blue and orange void with beautiful cars like this one, at about Speed Champions scale. Jonathan’s version uses plates and tiles wedged at all different angles to achieve the unique curves and angles of the original car, structured completely differently from the 1966 GT40 in the official set.

Gulf Racing Ford GT40 mk1

If you like Jonathan’s GT40 in Gulf livery, you’ll also love Joachim Klang’s Ford GT40 in Gulf livery.

This Mustang is in the shop for repairs

You may have noticed an abundance of Ford Mustangs featured on The Brothers Brick lately. The recent trend was ignited by a LEGO IDEAS contest, celebrating the Mustang in beautiful scenery. After wowing us by finding a Mustang in a barn, Andrea Lattanzio’s latest creation finds this Mustang in the shop. While the car itself is flawless, focus of the contest is on the scenery. And this garage is spot on.

Mustang fever: the pony at the shop

The structure is rife with subtle yet brilliant techniques, from the checkered pattern on the wall – alluding to the shop owner’s dreams on race day – to the broken window adding that extra dose of realism. My favourite technique is the droid arms and skeleton legs suspending the overhead lights. Not to be overlooked is the apparent master class in brick built garage and warehouse tools. The pallet jack, air compressor, drill press, gas pump and table vice are all amazing details that help make this garage beautiful.

This wild Mustang is the Boss of the canyon

Collaborative building projects can yield amazing results, such as this slick 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 302 overlooking a picturesque cliff. The bright red Mustang was built by ham_MOC, while the cliff was built by Jonathan S. If you didn’t know this was a collaboration, you might think everything was made by one person. That’s because the two builds pair nicely, complete with advanced coloring techniques like the Mustang’s two-tone exterior and the layering of colors on the cliff. It makes for a cohesive build that couples American muscle with the beauty of the American West.

The Open Road

The two builders built this colorful vignette for the LEGO Ideas contest, “Celebrate your favorite Ford Mustang in a beautiful scenery!”

A rustic barn with a classic Ford Mustang

Some LEGO builders say that architecture and scenery merely exist to serve as backdrops for cars or trains. Looking at this display built by Andrea Lattanzio, I beg to differ. While the classic first-series Mustang Hardtop is beautiful on its own, the barn behind it is equally delightful. Andrea achieved the barn’s dilapidated look through effective use of brown and dark grey tiles, which are not pressed down all the way. Personally, I find it difficult to ignore the satisfying feeling of pressing two LEGO pieces together but, when they’re tilted just a little and with varying degrees, the rustic charm is undeniable.

Americana: Mustang Hardtop barn find

Other highlights include the rusty broken gas pump and an American flag, which is cleverly formed out of plates with clips in such a way that makes it look as if it’s waving in a light breeze. The car itself cannot be overlooked; the lines are sleek and the construction is smooth. Curved slopes on the hood are ideal parts in creating the perfect angle, and the use of clear slopes for the windshield is simple but feels representative of a real Mustang.

Is the LEGO Creator Expert 10265 Ford Mustang the best LEGO car yet? [Review]

There are few cars more iconic than the Ford Mustang, which surpassed 10 million sold last year. So it’s fitting that the LEGO Creator Expert theme’s next automobile replica represents this piece of muscle car history. After taking us back 50 years to the world of spies and intrigue with the James Bond Aston Martin DB5 last August, LEGO is remaining in the 1960s with a striking blue-and-white version of the original pony car. Although LEGO coyly dodges addressing the specific year of the car (consistently referring to it as simply a 1960s model) the license plate and styling indicate that it’s primarily based on the GT Fastback from the 1967 model year. Available beginning March 1, 10265 Ford Mustang has 1,471 pieces and retails for $149.99 USD | $199.99 CAD | £119.99 GBP Click to read the full hands-on review

Rob Winner builds a winner of an engine shed

I’m a sucker for history and trains, and Rob Winner delivers on both counts with this slice of the Illinois Midland Railway in LEGO-form. According to the builder, the real line was only 1.9 miles long. This was in large part because of a crooked businessman making big promises and running off with the community of Newark’s money. Regardless, the little town made use of the railway to connect with nearby Millington. Rob’s model is meant to represent the railway during the 1940s, back when World War I veteran William Thorsen was running the show. Thorsen is depicted with the vehicles he operated, including a Vulcan 0-4-0T steam engine and Ford Model T railway inspection car.

Illinois Midland Railway 1

The engine shed plays its part well, looking weathered and forgotten. Rob pulled this off by adding vines and slightly tilting brown plates outward to simulate loosened wooden boards. It’s a stark contrast to Thorsen standing among railway equipment that looks well taken care of. Then again, he is their devoted caretaker! This juxtaposition is inspiring, symbolizing the fight to persevere against all odds.

Ride the roads in a really radical rat rod

In American car culture, the rat rod has come to symbolize rugged individualism. You might think of it as the automotive equivalent of a cowboy. Over the course of seven months, Manuel Nascimento built a LEGO Ford Model A rat rod. Manuel’s Model A oozes personality, with its “rust brown” patina, chrome trim and chopped, lowriding body. His model captures the subtle curves and angles of the real car. I’m particularly impressed with how the sides slightly slant upward.

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Manuel’s rat rod is as impressive mechanically as it is visually. The car is equipped with power functions motors for moving, steering, and the ability to raise and lower the rear. Because the engine is exposed, you can also see it in action. Manuel chose to highlight these features in the following video.

See this gorgeous Model A rat rod in action