Tag Archives: Technic

The LEGO Technic line was first released as “Expert Builder” sets in 1977, and LEGO has been producing Technic ever since, including Bionicle and MINDSTORMS. The custom Technic models featured here on The Brothers Brick include some pretty crazy and amazing mechanisms that’ll blow your mind, from self-sorting LEGO to automated Rubik’s Cube solvers.

2019’s LEGO Technic 42096 Porsche 911 RSR is 1,500 pieces of lean racing looks [Review]

Just three years after LEGO’s premium-branded 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS, Billund’s designers are returning to the German marque for another shot at the iconic 911. 42096 Porsche 911 RSR will be available Jan 1, 2019, for $149.99 USD (Dec. 26 in Europe). It includes 1,580 pieces.

Ringing in at 19 inches in length, it’s the largest set of the January Technic wave, and much larger than the tiny Speed Champions 911 RSR we reviewed in February 2018. Let’s see how this newest entrant to the LEGO Technic vehicles squadron stacks up.

Click to read the full hands-on review

LEGO Landrover is technically brilliant

LEGO Technic is a fantastic system for creating functional models with working mechanisms. However, it’s less often that we see Technic parts (particularly panels) integrated brilliantly into a “regular bricks” creation. However, this fabulous model of a Landrover Defender by ianying616 goes to show that the best builders select the best pieces for the job, regardless of which branch of the LEGO parts family they may originally come from. The shaping here is excellent — a good combination of regular System bricks and Technic axles, joints, and panels — perfectly capturing the recognisable lines of the Defender.

This thing is a BEAST — bulky and beautiful, with a striking black and red colour scheme. Beyond the overall styling, the details deserve appreciation: a rooftop lamp rack, a detailed interior, working suspension and steering, and opening doors, boot, and bonnet. And lurking beneath that bonnet? A gleaming engine block, ready to propel this bad boy through any obstacle in its path. Great stuff.

LEGO Technic 42096 Porsche 911 RSR is revealed [News]

A surprise, to be sure, but a welcome one: 42096 Porsche 911 RSR will be the largest LEGO Technic set of the first half of 2019. First official pictures reveal a 1,580-piece-large replica of one of the most iconic racing vehicles of our days. The set seems to be loaded with various play features: a rear wing with ‘swan neck’ mounts, detailed cockpit, working differential, independent suspension and some more. Unfortunately, the model features no working gear box, but its brilliant design seems to make up for any missing mechanism.

Click here to see more pictures…

Lamborghini Centanario: a car with killer curves

Anyone who has ever fallen in love with the romance of the Lamborghini knows the seductive power of its lines. The Centanario, designed in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Mr. Ferruccio Lamborghini, exemplifies everything brilliant about the alluring shape of its cars. Builder Lachlan Cameron has pulled out all the stops to replicate the sweeping form of the Centanario in LEGO Technic form.

Lamborghini Centanario

Sliding carefully selected Technic beams over flexi tube, he has captured the unique flow from bonnet to mudguards that defines the car. Add in a host of features such as superbly modelled doors, bucket seats and functioning lighting and you have a fitting tribute to one of today’s most recognisable supercars.

Lamborghini Centanario

CoRob: An ingenius construction aid, or a creepy robot menace?

Sheo, the master of beautiful, organic, strange, and sometimes creepy LEGO art, is back with yet another bizarre creation. While it may not be quite as creepy at first glance, imagine the slow turn of the ever-smiling head. Or maybe take a look at that smaller pair of hands, with their evil-looking claws. Yep, terrifying. Freakiness aside, CoRob the construction robot is actually pretty cool.

Technic Abomination

This automaton can transform into a variety of helpful job-site equipment. I’m a big fan of the crane… and that drone! Just look how happy he is! Do you like Sheo’s style? Like construction? Check out his motorized Bucyrus mining shovel replica. How about weird builds? Perhaps his dapper dragon or giant space fish is right up your alley.

Technic Abomination

Whether by sea or by air, this pod is ready for action

This skillfully built pod by Anthony Wilson combines Technic panels with system elements to create a stylish vehicle that would look equally at home deep underwater, as it would in space. One of my favorite details is the gently curving collection of steering handlebars peeking out behind the cockpit. Bright colored trim and tubes also lend a Tron vibe to this single pilot pod. And speaking of pilots, I tip my hat to Anthony for the excellent condition of his Technic figure which is 20 years old, but looks like he’s fresh off the assembly line.

Deep C. Slammer

That Technic light-bulb moment

Technic LEGO has so many real world applications, something Alexis Dos Santos’s angle poise lamp proves brilliantly. It’s an idea which the Technic frame structure realises so well, with the holed beams giving the feel of a high-end designer product. As an adult LEGO fan it’s something I could absolutely see on my desk at work. I just have to hope that Alexis has chosen a suitably low heat bulb and that his bright idea doesn’t end up as a puddle of plastic.
Technic Desk Lamp

Do the Technicolor Yawn with this Technic theme park thrill ride [Video]

Builder Shadow Elenter dubbed this the “3D Dizzy” and subjected Technic figures to do the Technicolor Yawn (aka barf). This is an imagined thrill ride at a theme park that spins ever so smoothly like a gyroscope and will surely induce nausea and leave anyone vertiginous with the constant spinning and rotation.

This feat took 14 motors that spans from Power Functions to custom SBrick controllers. It weighs almost 115.8 lbs (7.2kg) and measures 54x24x19 inches (90x59x47cm) in its dimensions.

Don’t let the spinning structure steal the show. The ride actually takes you through the full experience from buying tickets to access paths and ramps for the figures. The safety bars are programmed to secure the adrenaline-hungry humans just like in a real-world ride, and the ramp access automatically moves out of the way. Perhaps this will indeed inspire a real-world theme park ride!

Check out the full video here:

LEGO built a life-size Technic Bugatti Chiron that actually drives [News]

LEGO has revealed a life-size Bugatti Chiron built from more than a million Technic elements that actually drives. Powered by more than 2,300 Power Functions motors, the car is the first ever fully-functional self-propelled LEGO sports car, reaching top speeds nearing 20 mph (30 kph).

More impressive, LEGO designers didn’t use any glue in the construction which took more than 13,000 hours total. The life-size Technic Bugatti Chiron even includes a working speedometer and rear spoiler while replicating the sleek curves of the iconic sports car.

A bit bigger than the 42083 Technic Bugatti Chiron we reviewed earlier this summer, the life-sized model can fit two passengers inside and weighs a whopping 3,300 pounds (1,500 kg), supported by a steel frame.

Click to get a behind-the-scenes look at the life-size LEGO Technic Bugatti Chiron

This LEGO Technic RC Porsche 917K will really get your motor running [Video]

When the Porsche 917K hit the racing circuit, it made waves with victories at Le Mans in 1970 and 1971. This historic race car achieved further fame when it was driven by actor Steve McQueen in the classic film Le Mans (1971). McQueen’s 917K sported the Gulf racing team’s bold but beautiful light blue and orange livery. This particular version of the car holds a special place in Pawel Kmieć’s heart, so he painstakingly scaled it down into a terrific remote-controlled Technic model.

1970 Porsche 917K

See more photos and a video of this LEGO Technic Porsche in action

If you’re going to build a time machine into a car, why not do it with some Technic?

In cinema, there are few screen-used vehicles that seem to stand the test of time. If there were ever a car that would fit the bill, one of them would have to be the DMC-12 DeLorean time machine from the Back to the Future trilogy. The success of these films has sustained the popularity of the car, and many LEGO fans have answered the call by building their own DMC-12 time machines, including the fan-designed LEGO Ideas Back to the Future DeLorean. Many builders tend to model Doc Brown’s car in minifigure scale, but thewdarren has opted to go larger with a Technic version that is simply stunning. One of the most challenging aspects of building a DeLorean are the subtly slanted hood and windshield, both of which are immediately recognizable in this build.

Back to the futureII Delorean

See more photos of this fantastic LEGO Technic time machine

The biggest LEGO Technic set ever: 42082 Rough Terrain Crane [Review]

The LEGO Technic fan community has always been as diverse as possible, consisting of kids building simple cars, teens assembling larger sets and adult fans creating incredibly complicated LEGO mechanisms. Designing a product that will be liked by an audience this broad sounds like a dreadful challenge, and one of the possible solutions is releasing a model bigger and heavier than any other set before. This way comes LEGO Technic 42082 Rough Terrain Crane, a gigantic model of 4057 pieces retailing for $299.99. The new crane becomes the largest LEGO Technic set to ever hit store shelves, but this larger scale is not without some potential flaws…

Read our complete review of 42082 Rough Terrain Crane