Tag Archives: Technic

The LEGO Technic line was first released as “Expert Builder” sets in 1977, and LEGO has been producing Technic ever since, including Bionicle and MINDSTORMS. The custom Technic models featured here on The Brothers Brick include some pretty crazy and amazing mechanisms that’ll blow your mind, from self-sorting LEGO to automated Rubik’s Cube solvers.

Unimog unifies form and function

You may or may not be familiar with the Unimog – Mercedes’s all-wheel-drive multi-purpose utility vehicle. Usually they can be found constructing European highways or operating farm equipment. LEGO Technic veteran Kyle Wigboldy built the Unimog U-400 with an orange cab cleverly constructed with a combination of Technic elements and traditional LEGO. It took me a closer look to realise that this isn’t an official set from ten years ago, but rather a smaller build. Now that I have taken a closer look, this is in the same scale as the upcoming LEGO Technic 4×4 Zetros, which is based on a similar Mercedes truck.

Unimog U400

This build is packed to the brim with functions, such as the Technic essentials: engines, steering, suspension, all-wheel drive. This Unimog model also offers pneumatics, and power take-offs linked to the drive, which allow attachment equipments to be powered from the truck, as demonstrated by the motorised LEGO set. While this build does not come with attachments, it does have a flatbed with variable three-way tilt. You can check it out in the video below:

Check out some other Unimogs that other people have built!

LEGO unveils life-size Lamborghini Sián FKP 37 built with over 400,000 pieces [News]

LEGO unveils yet another life-size sports car to add to their collection: Lamborghini Sián FKP 37. The model is made of more than 400,000 Technic pieces and weighs 2,200 kg. The model was created by 15 engineering and building specialists and took a total of 8,660 hours to develop and construct. To create it, 154 different types of LEGO Technic elements were used, and 20 of them were moulded just for this model.

Click to see the full details of the 1:1 scaled vehicle

Scooter Computer and Mr. Chips

Actually, their names are Ike and Mack (Ike’s the tall one). But when I saw these two LEGO Creations by builder Silvak The Mocist, I had an instant flashback to that old Schoolhouse Rock series about a skateboarding kid and his computer-headed pal. Despite a passing resemblance to that old cartoon, I get the impression these two are less likely to teach us about computers and more likely to grind along some railing, leaving a rotary telephone-headed old man shaking his fist at those darn kids. Silvak’s done a great job of communicating character here, from Ike’s expressive limbs to Mack’s radical pair of kicks. I’m particularly impressed by how those Technic panels hang like an open hoodie on Ike. And bonus points for using the old M-Tron logo so Mack can put his initial on his skateboard.

Click here to see more Ike and Mack on your iMac (or PC or phone or whatever)

No job too big for the Technic Rexx

LEGO Technic builder Kirill Mazurov has graced us with a vehicle so amazing it deserves a second, third and fourth look. Kirill seems to be a builder of very few words. There are no descriptions with his photos. However, he has posted a video on YouTube that does all the talking for him. This model certainly has all the working functions you’d expect from a Technic model this size. It boasts an impressive fifteen motors and twenty huge tires!

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For once I’m also going to be a writer of very few words and let the video do the talking. Give it a looksy. It does not disappoint!

A box that unwraps itself

Sometimes I see a LEGO Technic model that makes me scratch my head and wonder how the builder came up with the idea, let alone actually made it work. This unfolding box by YouTuber munimuni Bekkan is definitely one of those times. This clever little box is motorized so that it can unfold to lay completely flat, and then close back up. I’m not sure what you’d use this for, but I know there’s got to be something awesome. I do know that I could have used something like this last time I moved…

Check out the full video of it in action below.

I am the robot walrus

When I first heard about Mitsuru Nikaido‘s LEGO mecha walrus, I pictured a cyberpunk Beatles nightmare. But when I looked at how well-built and detailed it was, I was only impressed.

LEGO Mecha Walrus_09

What really sells this as a mecha walrus are the green eyes. They give off a ghostly computer-like glow that is creepy and makes the rest of the build look metallic. The tubing also helps, but without the eyes, I would have thought it was just a LEGO Technic-style sea mammal.
LEGO Mecha Walrus_11

The skin even looks like armor plating! Well done, Mitsuru!

A vintage racer from automobile history

Back in the 1920s and ’30s, when Ferdinand Porsche and Enzo Ferrari were not heads of exotic sports car companies but mere racecar drivers, Mercedes-Benz pushed the limits of racing using supercharger technology developed from airplane engines. One sports car that utilized this enhancement was the Mercedes-Benz SSKL of 1931, which LEGO Technic and Model Team expert Pawel Kmieć (Sariel) faithfully replicated. This old roadster jumps out from black and white photographs with a clean white livery, custom-chromed parts and the laurel wreath of champions.

Mercedes-Benz SSKL

Pawel is a master of building accurate vehicles that are also packed with functions. He includes everything an essential large-scale LEGO vehicle needs: suspension and steering. In addition, he often crams the body of these vehicles full of LEGO electric motors, allowing remote control. This display model becomes a real-life racer, pushing a top speed of 5mph. Watch Pawel’s in-depth video of the build process, and the speedy drive outdoors.

Check out more builds depicting LEGO Mercedes-Benz vehicles!

Functional Febrovery

Febrovery – the annual event where people build space rovers from LEGO. I (Mansur “Waffles” Soeleman) couldn’t say no to building a wheeled space vehicle this month. However, I decided to take a different approach: make it move, make it work, and make it Technical. The result is the Horizon Chariot – a massive, greebly shuttle transporter in a LEGO Classic Space livery. On the outside, it looks like a jumble of layers and pipes, but it’s merely a shell for a complex Technic frame with a working four-wheel drive with a double V8 piston engine, working steering, and soft pendular suspension. My favourite feature turned out to be a working tipping flatbed which launches the small LL-64 Arcade Hopper.

Febrovery - Horizon Chariot and LL-64 Arcade Hopper

The spaceship belonging to the Horizon Chariot was more of a distraction than an afterthought. I wanted to incorporate a NinjaGo arcade pod into the build as the blue airtight section of Classic Space vehicles. I found it was too small for a big vehicle so why not make a smaller vehicle as part of it? That’s how the aptly named LL-64 Arcade Hopper was born. I just couldn’t stop myself from building a spaceship! With swing-down wings and a smooth underside, it’s really a step away from my usually greebly builds, but it turned out to be a beautiful two-seater shuttle.

Check out the Flickr album to see more photos of the rover and the spaceship!

Taking stargazing to the next level

Free from light pollution and smog, this observation deck would be perfect for spotting a planetary conjunction. But there’s certainly a greater spectacle in this vibrant LEGO creation. The Galaxy Cliff Lighthouse by Pete Strege offers an incredible, up-close view of a spiraling galaxy. This Ferris-wheel-like galaxy is motorized, which is quite an engineering feat for its unique shape and scale. Its free-standing tail overarches the entire model, making this build an event of a lifetime.

Galaxy Cliff Lighthouse

Click here to see more views of the Galaxy Cliff Lighthouse

LEGO Technic 42122 Jeep Wrangler: the ultimate 4×4 to fit your wallet [Review]

The most iconic offroader of all time has now joined the LEGO pantheon. The LEGO Technic 42122 Jeep Wrangler is the first time in decades LEGO has licensed the classic brand whose name is nearly synonymous with 4×4. (A few old very old sets bear the Jeep name, but are so rudimentary the resemblance is weak at best.) When I first heard about the new Jeep set, I assumed it would be the American counterpart to last year’s excellent Technic 42110 Land Rover Defender, a massive 2,500-piece set. However, the Jeep has more modest aims, coming in at just 665 pieces. It features functional steering, suspension, and a winch. It will be available starting January 1, 2021, for US $49.99 | CAN $69.99 | UK £44.99.

The LEGO Group provided The Brothers Brick with an early copy of this set for review. Providing TBB with products for review guarantees neither coverage nor positive reviews.

Click to read the full, hands-on review of the LEGO Technic Jeep Wrangler

The McLaren Senna that Technic supercar fans deserve

Recently, LEGO revealed a new Technic McLaren Senna set, but rather than make it the same 1:8 scale as the Lamborghini, Bugatti, or Porsche, it’s closer to the Corvette ZR1. This might disappoint some folks, like my brother, an avid collector of the Technic supercars. Not me. I don’t buy Technic sets generally and certainly would never drop $350 on one (or even $50, for that matter); that being said, I do love to look at them. That’s where builders like Jordan Langerak come in. Jordan has crafted a great likeness of the car, with huge intakes, the strange windows in the lower part of the doors, and all the rest.

This version blows the pants off the official LEGO set in every way, from size to shaping. It has functional butterfly doors, a 7-speed gearbox, a 4-wheel independent suspension, steering, adjustable wing, and whatever other bells and whistles one would expect from an official set, only it’s a custom creation. It might not be as cool as the tiny, awkwardly proportioned 6-wide Speed Champions Senna (which I do own), but for people who like Technic, it’s pretty neat. Did I mention that this is Jordan’s first custom build? Oh, and there’s a video, too:

LEGO Technic reveals new 42123 McLaren Senna GTR with 830 pieces [News]

The LEGO Group and McLaren Automotive continue their collaboration with yet another building set, 42123 McLaren Senna GTR. The new LEGO Technic model is an 830-piece replica of GTR modification of the world-famous hypercar in the blue and silver livery. The set will hit store shelves on January 1, 2021, with a price of US $49.99 | CAN $69.99 | UK £44.99 | EU €49.99 | AU $89.99.

Judging by the size of the model, the new 42123 McLaren Senna GTR is in the same category with 42109 App-Controlled Top Gear Rally Car . However, since the McLaren has no motors or smart hubs, functionally, it is similar to the last year’s best-seller 42093 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1.

Don’t miss the other new sets for 2021:

See more of the McLaren Senna GTR below.

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