Tag Archives: Technic

The LEGO Technic line was first released as “Expert Builder” sets in 1977, and LEGO has been producing Technic ever since, including Bionicle and MINDSTORMS. The custom Technic models featured here on The Brothers Brick include some pretty crazy and amazing mechanisms that’ll blow your mind, from self-sorting LEGO to automated Rubik’s Cube solvers.

That Technic light-bulb moment

Technic LEGO has so many real world applications, something Alexis Dos Santos’s angle poise lamp proves brilliantly. It’s an idea which the Technic frame structure realises so well, with the holed beams giving the feel of a high-end designer product. As an adult LEGO fan it’s something I could absolutely see on my desk at work. I just have to hope that Alexis has chosen a suitably low heat bulb and that his bright idea doesn’t end up as a puddle of plastic.
Technic Desk Lamp

Do the Technicolor Yawn with this Technic theme park thrill ride [Video]

Builder Shadow Elenter dubbed this the “3D Dizzy” and subjected Technic figures to do the Technicolor Yawn (aka barf). This is an imagined thrill ride at a theme park that spins ever so smoothly like a gyroscope and will surely induce nausea and leave anyone vertiginous with the constant spinning and rotation.

This feat took 14 motors that spans from Power Functions to custom SBrick controllers. It weighs almost 115.8 lbs (7.2kg) and measures 54x24x19 inches (90x59x47cm) in its dimensions.

Don’t let the spinning structure steal the show. The ride actually takes you through the full experience from buying tickets to access paths and ramps for the figures. The safety bars are programmed to secure the adrenaline-hungry humans just like in a real-world ride, and the ramp access automatically moves out of the way. Perhaps this will indeed inspire a real-world theme park ride!

Check out the full video here:

LEGO built a life-size Technic Bugatti Chiron that actually drives [News]

LEGO has revealed a life-size Bugatti Chiron built from more than a million Technic elements that actually drives. Powered by more than 2,300 Power Functions motors, the car is the first ever fully-functional self-propelled LEGO sports car, reaching top speeds nearing 20 mph (30 kph).

More impressive, LEGO designers didn’t use any glue in the construction which took more than 13,000 hours total. The life-size Technic Bugatti Chiron even includes a working speedometer and rear spoiler while replicating the sleek curves of the iconic sports car.

A bit bigger than the 42083 Technic Bugatti Chiron we reviewed earlier this summer, the life-sized model can fit two passengers inside and weighs a whopping 3,300 pounds (1,500 kg), supported by a steel frame.

Click to get a behind-the-scenes look at the life-size LEGO Technic Bugatti Chiron

This LEGO Technic RC Porsche 917K will really get your motor running [Video]

When the Porsche 917K hit the racing circuit, it made waves with victories at Le Mans in 1970 and 1971. This historic race car achieved further fame when it was driven by actor Steve McQueen in the classic film Le Mans (1971). McQueen’s 917K sported the Gulf racing team’s bold but beautiful light blue and orange livery. This particular version of the car holds a special place in Pawel Kmieć’s heart, so he painstakingly scaled it down into a terrific remote-controlled Technic model.

1970 Porsche 917K

See more photos and a video of this LEGO Technic Porsche in action

If you’re going to build a time machine into a car, why not do it with some Technic?

In cinema, there are few screen-used vehicles that seem to stand the test of time. If there were ever a car that would fit the bill, one of them would have to be the DMC-12 DeLorean time machine from the Back to the Future trilogy. The success of these films has sustained the popularity of the car, and many LEGO fans have answered the call by building their own DMC-12 time machines, including the fan-designed LEGO Ideas Back to the Future DeLorean. Many builders tend to model Doc Brown’s car in minifigure scale, but thewdarren has opted to go larger with a Technic version that is simply stunning. One of the most challenging aspects of building a DeLorean are the subtly slanted hood and windshield, both of which are immediately recognizable in this build.

Back to the futureII Delorean

See more photos of this fantastic LEGO Technic time machine

The biggest LEGO Technic set ever: 42082 Rough Terrain Crane [Review]

The LEGO Technic fan community has always been as diverse as possible, consisting of kids building simple cars, teens assembling larger sets and adult fans creating incredibly complicated LEGO mechanisms. Designing a product that will be liked by an audience this broad sounds like a dreadful challenge, and one of the possible solutions is releasing a model bigger and heavier than any other set before. This way comes LEGO Technic 42082 Rough Terrain Crane, a gigantic model of 4057 pieces retailing for $299.99. The new crane becomes the largest LEGO Technic set to ever hit store shelves, but this larger scale is not without some potential flaws…

Read our complete review of 42082 Rough Terrain Crane

“How about a ride, mister?”

When it comes to fan-built Back to the Future models, there are a plethora of DeLorean time machines out there. Heck, there was even an official LEGO set! While I love the DeLorean as much as the next person, who can forget the 1985 Toyota SR5 pickup truck (also known as the Hilux outside of the U.S.)? This was the truck Marty McFly pined over with his girlfriend, became a reality when he returned home to a transformed 1985, and nearly ruined his life when Needles called him “chicken” for refusing to race. Fortunately, Nikolay Gamurar remembered Marty’s truck and built a fantastic rendition of the vehicle in Technic form. While the Toyota from the movie was a two-door model, Nikolay modified his truck to have four-door extended cab. Outside of this mod, the sculpting of the rest of the body feels faithful to the original truck. As a Technic build, it looks stunning in black.

LEGO Technic TOYOTA HILUX N40 by RM8 MOD Back To The Future

Nikolay’s truck is packed with a lot of detail, right down to the Chassis. This photograph also gives at glimpse at some of the Toyota’s key mechanical functions.

LEGO Technic TOYOTA HILUX N40 by RM8 MOD Back To The Future

It also features a nice and roomy interior, perfect for a comfortable drive to the lake.

LEGO Technic TOYOTA HILUX N40 by RM8 MOD Back To The Future

LEGO Technic Ferrari Testarossa: An icon of 1980s retro culture

Building supercars, especially Ferraris, is a mixed blessing: Sometimes you know exactly what pieces you need and how they’ll all work together, but just one wrongly placed pin or tile can ruin the model’s proportions and send it to the dustbin. However, when every single piece takes its rightful place, an outstanding scale model is born — just like this beautiful Ferrari Testarossa by Jeroen Ottens.

Testa_3q

This is the case when a creation does not need any description; it is just too lovely to simply list all of its parts. And when you finish enjoying this LEGO Testarossa’s iconic exterior, peek inside at its very detailed interior, which even has a working glovebox!

Ferrari Testarossa

Wherever Tatra T-813 goes, it needs no roads

Tatra trucks, the legendary Czech heavy-duty vehicles, are extremely popular among LEGO builders of the most various genres. Because of the machines’ featureless exterior the goal of building a remarkable Tatra has shifted towards its inner mechanisms and chassis. Paweł Kmieć (aka Sariel) rolls out a fantastic 1:18 replica of Tatra T-813 8×8 Kolos stuffed with amazing engineering solutions.

Tatra T-813 8x8 Kolos

Click here to learn more about the model’s chassis

LEGO Honda CRZ

LEGO Technic cars like this Honda CRZ by Lachlan Cameron never cease to amaze me with their complexity. The build is chock full of excellent techniques, my favorite of which must be the headlights, which are accomplished using transparent black vehicle windscreens with chrome 2×2 dishes inside as the individual light reflectors.

Eagle-eyed viewers may notice what looks like red tape covering the roof and the hood of the car. This is likely because the technic panels used on these parts of the car were never produced in red, so red tape had to be used to make black ones match the overall color scheme–a simple and smart solution to the problem of part availability.

Honda CR-Z - final rendition -

This is not a TV commercial for the Landrover Defender....

Krzysztof Cytacki’s Technic version of a Landrover Defender is an excellent version of Great Britain’s gift to the world of 4×4 offroading. While the model itself is nice, the photography is what first attracted me to Cytacki’s work. By taking pictures of his Landrover in the wilderness, Cytacki perfectly captures the feeling of a televised auto ad. You can almost hear the roar of the engine and smell the earthy aroma of mud kicking back as the vehicle scales the rugged terrain. The natural setting does better justice to Cytacki’s model than a plain background could achieve.

IMG_0947 1500px

See more photos of this gorgeous LEGO Technic Landrover

LEGO Technic 42083 Bugatti Chiron: the world’s most luxurious supercar now a premium LEGO set [Review + Video]

When you’re a kid playing with LEGO bricks, getting a new LEGO set for your birthday or Christmas is exciting beyond belief. There’s so much hidden play value trapped inside that colorful box–yellow, with the words LEGOLAND stamped on the front, if you grew up in the 80s–that you can’t wait to tear it open and begin building. Chances are, if you’re reading The Brothers Brick, you’re like me and still feverishly tear into new LEGO sets, no matter your age. But every once in awhile a set comes along that makes you slow down and just admire the box for a bit. Not that you’re less excited to build it, but rather that there’s something about this set that makes you want to savor it. Ask the butler to bring you some champagne. Settle into your yacht’s white leather couch, and pull up the Swarovski crystal coffee table. This set is going to be epic, and you can already feel it. LEGO’s second premium Technic set, 42083 Bugatti Chiron, is the best set of this kind yet. It’s based on the French ultra-luxury brand’s newest supercar, a 1,500 horsepower 2-seater that can rocket you to 261 miles per hour in pure comfort, provided you can afford the starting price of $2.7 million. The LEGO version is a bit more modest, however, including 3,599 pieces and retailing for $349.99 USD ($399.99 in Canada£329.99 in the UK). It is available now.

Click to the read the full hands-on review of the Bugatti Chiron and watch the video