Tag Archives: Power Functions

The next evolution of walking LEGO dinosaurs [Video]

We’ve been following the ongoing evolution of a series of mechanical LEGO dinosaurs built by Dan Schlumpp. Each iteration has become more and more streamlined, and the latest addition to his Mesozoic menagerie is no exception. The body-shaping is excellent, as well as the color choices.

Walking Lego Stegosuarus -01

This stegosaurus not only looks great, but lumbers around beautifully! It’s amazing to get such an organic body while still trying to create and hide all the right mechanical components.

If you’re curious about the previous iterations, check out our feature on one of Dan’s previous dinos.

Ride the roads in a really radical rat rod

In American car culture, the rat rod has come to symbolize rugged individualism. You might think of it as the automotive equivalent of a cowboy. Over the course of seven months, Manuel Nascimento built a LEGO Ford Model A rat rod. Manuel’s Model A oozes personality, with its “rust brown” patina, chrome trim and chopped, lowriding body. His model captures the subtle curves and angles of the real car. I’m particularly impressed with how the sides slightly slant upward.

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Manuel’s rat rod is as impressive mechanically as it is visually. The car is equipped with power functions motors for moving, steering, and the ability to raise and lower the rear. Because the engine is exposed, you can also see it in action. Manuel chose to highlight these features in the following video.

See this gorgeous Model A rat rod in action

The wrath of Hurricane Maria descends on the island of Puerto Rico

A little over a year ago, Hurricane Maria devastated the island of Puerto Rico, killing thousands of residents and leaving many more without power, water, and basic necessities for many months afterward. Contrary to the words and actions of some American politicians, Puerto Rico is no less a part of the United States than Washington, D.C. itself is, but recovery efforts have been hampered by racism, callous politics, and name-calling. LEGO builder Nathan C. lived through Hurrican Maria, and recently created a LEGO model that illustrates the fear, terror, and destruction he experienced as the storm passed over him.

Hurricane Maria LEGO MOC (With Notes)

Not only does his detailed LEGO diorama capture the destruction that Hurricane Maria caused on the island, Nathan has animated his model with LEGO Power Functions — the tree and satellite TV dish sway in the wind, roof boards flap, and more. Also be sure to click through to the photo above to read Nathan’s detailed notes about the specific ways in which Maria affected the people and buildings of Puerto Rico, ranging from the implosion of concrete walls to broken water mains.

This isn’t the first time that we’ve featured a strong political statement in LEGO about a terrible storm. Back in September 2005, I commented on the Federal government’s poor reaction to Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans with a much smaller LEGO vignette.

This LEGO piano is taking baby grand to a whole new level [Video]

Donny Chen is a musician, piano teacher, and piano tuner. That would explain the epic mastery behind this phenomenal LEGO instrument. I’m a piano player myself, and grew up fascinated with the inner-workings of our own (life-size) grand piano. I must say, this little marvel is basically the complete package!

Lego Piano

While it doesn’t have all 88 keys that a real grand piano would have, it does have a very similar mechanism.

Lego Piano

Click to read more about this incredible model and watch a video of it in action!

LEGO opens vault to re-release 10268 Vestas Wind Turbine on Black Friday [News]

LEGO has announced it is going green with the re-release of an old fan-favorite set currently owned by very few: the 10268 Vestas Wind Turbine. The original set (numbered 4999) was released a decade ago as a limited production run for Vestas, a sustainable energy company, and never saw wider availability. That changes on Black Friday.

Following in the path of the last year’s re-released 10256 Taj Mahal, LEGO is “opening the vault” once again with a slightly updated rendition of the Creator Expert Vestas Wind Turbine. The set comes with 826 pieces (11 more than the first version), three minifigures, a dog, and Power Functions motor and lights, as well as the first spruce tree element made from plants available in a retail set.

The set is slightly more than three feet tall (one meter) and will retail at $199.99 USD from LEGO (coming in at $249.99 CA and £159.99 UK respectively). It will be available for purchase by everyone starting Friday, November 23 (also known as Black Friday).
Click to take a closer look at the Vestas Wind Turbine

Do the Technicolor Yawn with this Technic theme park thrill ride [Video]

Builder Shadow Elenter dubbed this the “3D Dizzy” and subjected Technic figures to do the Technicolor Yawn (aka barf). This is an imagined thrill ride at a theme park that spins ever so smoothly like a gyroscope and will surely induce nausea and leave anyone vertiginous with the constant spinning and rotation.

This feat took 14 motors that spans from Power Functions to custom SBrick controllers. It weighs almost 115.8 lbs (7.2kg) and measures 54x24x19 inches (90x59x47cm) in its dimensions.

Don’t let the spinning structure steal the show. The ride actually takes you through the full experience from buying tickets to access paths and ramps for the figures. The safety bars are programmed to secure the adrenaline-hungry humans just like in a real-world ride, and the ramp access automatically moves out of the way. Perhaps this will indeed inspire a real-world theme park ride!

Check out the full video here:

LEGO City 60197 and 60198 will introduce the new LEGO Powered Up smart application [News]

The new City train sets have been revealed last week partially confirming the long-rumored updates of the Power Functions system. With only the pictures of the front of the boxes it was pretty hard to say whether the new system will support Bluetooth connection or not, but now, as pictures of the rear side have appeared online, the answer is “yes”; the new trains can be both controlled with a remote controller (included in each set) or with a smart phone.

Click here to read about the new Power Functions 2.0 system

Never step on a LEGO again with this LEGO Technic “Rumba” [Video]

Builders of all ages struggle to keep LEGO pieces off of the floor. But those days may soon be over thanks to The Brick Wall! Rather than buying an autonomous floor cleaner, The Brick Wall brought us an invention that could revolutionize any LEGO fan’s life. It’s called the Lego Rumba.

This fully motorized and untethered device can sweep up small technic pins, medium plates, large bricks—even minifigs—from a flat service into a holding bin. Two sets of treads provide the business end of the creation, with rubber strips stuck into the grommets for sweeping power. A robotic grabbing arm allows the model to pick up extra-large items like Technic tires. Click the video below to see the LEGO Rumba in action.

While not conventionally beautiful, the open sides of the model provide an unobstructed look at the functional components that make this contraption go. Check out more of The Brick Wall’s marvelous creations on YouTube.

Bacon in space!

In the future when humans have colonized other planets, they still have to get their bacon somehow. Pangeran Panda builds a solution in his meat processing factory where livestock is directly processed into consumable goods.

Bacon City

Bacon City

The transparent walls let you see the motorized conveyor belts in action, but wait, something isn’t quite right. Take a look at the video and see if you get a laugh out of the builder’s sense of humor.

Remote control LEGO Technic Dodge Viper to spin the dyno [Video]

Nothing screams American metal and gasoline-fueled testosterone like the Dodge Viper. This remote control Technic Dodge Viper comes courtesy of MRX Lego.

Dodge Viper ACR Nurburgring Styling

Of course, a model couldn’t claim the title “Viper” without a white body and blue racing stripes. Additional stylistic details include a front air dam (made of SYSTEM plates), racing seats, a moving (but fake) shift knob, and a massive rear wing spoiler. The interior includes an actual headlight switch under the dashboard that operates the front headlights.

Learn more about this stellar LEGO Technic muscle car

Lara Croft lives dangerously in this amazing, animated Tomb Raider LEGO diorama [Video]

With the original Tomb Raider video game released back in 1996 and yet another movie this year, it’s clear that there’s a lot of mileage in the Lara Croft story. The mix of adventure, exotic locations and history also makes Tomb Raider great inspiration for LEGO creations. Kevin Wanner has created a Tomb Raider diorama that has some powered features — a cascading waterfall and a perilously angled B-25 that moves as Lara Croft crosses. The negative space lettering is nicely constructed and there’s a lot of character built into the overgrown crash site.

Tomb Raider:

CLick to see close-ups and a video of the moving features

Three LEGO motors, 17 LEGO pneumatic cylinders and a pinch of engineering magic

Apparently German builder Quanix knows about engineering with LEGO something that I can refer to simply as “magic”. With only 3 Power Function motors (plus 1 servo-motor) he somehow controls 17 independent pneumatic cylinders, which are capable of moving 1200 LEGO basketball/soccer balls around the circuit in an hour. This monstrosity is built with more than 3,000 LEGO bricks including more than 150 cm of conveyor belt.

Not sharing a video of this beauty in action would be a terrible mistake. Make sure nobody disturbs you during the next 10 minutes of this mesmerising performance: