Tag Archives: Hot Rod

Church of the Holy V-8

When I saw this image I said to myself-there’s something vaguely hot rod-ish about that church. Then I said, maybe I’m just a crazy car-guy instilling my crazy car-guy values into everything I see. Quit being weird and move on with your day! Because that is the kind of dialogue I have with myself. Then I read the title “Mechanical Church” and thought, “the fact that it looks kinda-sorta like a hot rod was totally Alego Alego‘s intent!” Who is crazy and weird now? Still me, probably, but at least in this case I have been validated. By using two engine cylinders and a radiator grille for a door it looks like the builder could lift the church from the grounds and install it in a hot rod, and the results would look pretty cool. If you do this Alego Alego, I suggest you call it “Holy Roller” or “Holy Roadster”. Brilliant idea or no?

Mechanical church

Get your motor running, head out on the highway

Having built a car or two(hundred) myself, I get a kick out of it when someone else does this good a job showing the automobile some love. This one may be unique because we might be dealing with a young builder here, or at least someone with a cool, supportive mom. Carrie Kokoska is not the builder, however, she just created a new Flickr account to showcase these photos on behalf of her oldest son. “The Bend City Auto Garage” gets its inspiration from an old pharmacy in their local town. We are looking at a builder who is passionate about LEGO and working at his grandpa’s garage, where he restores vintage cars. The posters and stickers both inside and out were designed by the builder’s mom, making this truly a family project.

Side view hot rod on lift

See more of this highly detailed garage and vintage car

Hey pal, where ya going?

Next to towering skyscrapers and the Statue of Liberty, New York City has also long been identified with streets full of yellow taxicabs. LEGO car builder Pixeljunkie chose to represent a classic Checker cab, complete with its characteristic black and white checkerboard-style trim. While the car itself looks great, it is further enhanced by the gritty scenery which includes a knocked over trash can. Meanwhile, the irritated-looking minifig driver sitting cross-legged adds an extra dash of personality.

Mini Taxi

If you love the Checker cab, you will probably also enjoy Pixeljunkie’s chopped Model A Ford hot rod. It packs some serious muscle in the engine and behind the wheel, and the whitewall tires give it a strong sense of style.

1930 Ford Model A Pick Up Hot Rod "1 HMRD A"

Ride the roads in a really radical rat rod

In American car culture, the rat rod has come to symbolize rugged individualism. You might think of it as the automotive equivalent of a cowboy. Over the course of seven months, Manuel Nascimento built a LEGO Ford Model A rat rod. Manuel’s Model A oozes personality, with its “rust brown” patina, chrome trim and chopped, lowriding body. His model captures the subtle curves and angles of the real car. I’m particularly impressed with how the sides slightly slant upward.

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Manuel’s rat rod is as impressive mechanically as it is visually. The car is equipped with power functions motors for moving, steering, and the ability to raise and lower the rear. Because the engine is exposed, you can also see it in action. Manuel chose to highlight these features in the following video.

See this gorgeous Model A rat rod in action

The restoration of a hot rod

Builder Pixeljunkie’s latest creation is a charming old auto shop where a group of builders works to restore a classic car to from its barn-fresh state to a splendid showpiece. A series of images transcribe the journey, beginning with the mottled and rusted car and a simple blueprint of what might be.

Vintage Garage Diorama Scene 4

Throughout the scenes, the workshop is packed full to bursting with intricate details that bring the scene to life. Surrounding the crew is all the detritus common to a mechanic, from tools and dusty equipment to overflowing waste bins and parts shelves. This shop truly feels lived in. Continue reading

You can practically hear this baby growl

Who hasn’t imagined cruising down the main drag in a custom hot rod? Whilst doing it for real might prove beyond most people’s budgets, maybe we can take a leaf out of ianying616‘s book and at least create a LEGO version of our dream automobile. This black and silver vehicle is an intimidating beast, all hunkered-down suspension and gleaming chrome highlights amidst the black and grey. The monochromatic colour scheme doesn’t just look mean, it reduces distractions, keeping the focus of attention on the smooth lines of the bodywork and the details of that hulking engine.

CrocRod_TBC14

Not content with furnishing this beast with working steering and suspension, the builder has also given it a pristine interior, complete with nicely upholstered seats, dashboard instrumentation, gear stick, and handbrake…

CrocRod_TBC43

These classic hot rods are totally tubular

Throughout America, a trip to the beach can often go hand-in-hand with a classic car show. People love the warm summer sun, the smell of the surf, and feeling the breeze blowing through their hair as they drive down coastal roadways. Taking this as inspiration, Norton74 has created a beautiful beach setting for two equally gorgeous hot rods. Early Fords are popular with hot rod enthusiasts, which is probably why Norton74 went with modified versions of a 1930s Ford V8 (left) and 1920s Model T (right). Thanks to the combination of curves and exposed engine details, the cars look both sophisticated and mean. They’re like the classic bad boy with the soft heart. A sign warns surfers to watch out for sharks, but I would probably be more worried about that sand washing up on the tile-built boardwalk. Scratch attack!

Totally Tubular!

Showdown on Biker Street

Austrian LEGO builder Sanel Lukovic has been building a large-scale diorama depicting hot rod culture. The scene has a lovely vintage vibe, and Sanel displayed it recently at LEGO exhibitions in Slovenia and Croatia.

Biker Street Final Picture

The diorama includes a fully brick-built street surrounded by a diner, hot rod garage, biker bar, and gasoline station. Let’s take a closer look!

See more of this detailed LEGO diorama after the jump

Technic Pneumatic V8 Hot Rod, 1/8 scale

Consider, for a moment, if you will, the not-so-humble hot rod chassis. Builder Green Gecko Lego Technic Workshop certainly did with their “Lego Technic Pneumatic HOT ROD Chassis.” This Technic model features independent front suspension, precision pneumatic steering, solid axle rear suspension, and even a working V8 engine with realistic sound and revving.

Green Gecko has posted a video of the complete hot rod that includes body panels, a mean-looking front grille, opening doors, and chromed pipes. This video also shows the custom controller for the full remote control car, which includes a pair of cylinders that control the steering and a pneumatic switch to control the engine.

Take a look at Green Gecko’s YouTube channel for more detailed custom Technic models.

A totally traditional and completely unconventional car

There are fast cars, classic cars, utility cars and many other kind of vehicles depending on their purpose. But hot rods are all about making an impression. This is exactly what this beauty by red 2 does; it makes an impression. This 1931 Ford Rat Rod has it all; it’s loud, low, chopped, with giant rear tires, open pipes. What is especially impressive about it is its sand green body; to be honest, it took me a couple of minutes to recall each of these pieces in sand green in official LEGO sets.

1931 Ford Rat Rod

’32 Ford Deuce served in true vintage style

This classic hot rod, built by Andrea Lattanzio, doesn’t have a bright red or racing green paint job, but a rather more drab shade of tan. Officially known as Cordoba Tan, it was a colour used almost exclusively by Ford, and the actual vehicle depicted is a 1932 Ford Deuce 3 Window Coupé. The hot rod is awesome, but for me the background workshop with its vintage details draws the whole image together. I love the vintage Coca-Cola bottle vending machine, the palate with Esso oil spilling onto the floor, and the retro radio on the window sill.

'32 Ford Deuce 3 Window Coupé (a.k.a. the Takehito Yamato Coupé)

This particular Deuce was built in California and shipped to Japan where its new owner lives. Takehito Yamato contacted the Walden Speed Shop in Pomona, California, to order a traditional hot rod.  Andrea has also captured this hot rod’s details in LEGO as you can see from the broken-down view showing the red Chevy ZZ383 with aluminium heads in all its glory.

'32 Ford Deuce 3 Window Coupé (a.k.a. the Takehito Yamato Coupé)

Hit the beach in this stripped-down rat rod

Austria may not have any ocean beaches, but that didn’t stop Austrian builder Sanel Lukovic from building this lovely scene featuring a rockabilly dude hauling his board from his heavily customized “rat rod” to the inviting blue surf. True to the rat rod aesthetic, the vintage car has an exposed engine and what I’m assuming is a rust-bucket body — truly lovely. The surfer features a pompadour hairstyle and a rather hirsute custom torso from Citizen Brick. Sanel completes the scene with little details like a trash can and pilings with tree rings.

Going to the Beach....