Tag Archives: Tree

A very heart-y tree

Spooky builds don’t have to be all black to get their point across. Anthony Wilson has created a LEGO-based human-tree hybrid called the Aortis Bloom that instead leans into the crimson side of the spectrum. The medically-inclined among us might not even find it creepy – the heart is just a biological necessity, after all. The twisting veins and arteries made from dinosaur tail elements may be a little disquieting, but they’re also very vital to good health. And the blood-red and dark-blue leaves suggest the flowing of oxygen through the system. I’m not sure what those little bits of “fruit” are supposed to represent, though. And just what is the tree sitting in? Dirt? Dried blood? And while really elegant looking, I think that table is actually evil, too. (Just trust me on that.)

Aortis Bloom

If you’d like your October to be a bit more direct with the disquieting images, just take a scroll through our horror archives.

Something to ponder

I’m old enough to remember when things were simpler, and LEGO Tensegrity builds were all the rage. This sculpture from Bendrig evokes the calm and peaceful state of a nearly forgotten age. Arch bricks and curved slopes create an organic trunk, and there’s just the right amount of foliage. I also like the simplicity of the two-tone base where a layer of loose 1×1 round plate makes for a nice zen-garden feel.

Tensegrity Bonsai

It’s nice just to take a break and ponder the natural levitation of this sculpture. Maybe one day more things will be in balance like this.

Those who live in glass houses

You’ve heard of treehouses. Now Aukbricks presents something that is a tree…in a house. This LEGO creation is like a childhood dream, a four-story modern home that surrounds a tree. The inspiration is a concept by A. Masow Architects. Incidentally, this LEGO creation and its real-life counterpart are both renders that don’t exist in real form but AuKbricks tells us he used about 4500 bricks, all of them utilizing real colors and legal connections.

Tree in the House

Click here to tour the house

Destiny Rules

Call it fate, call it karma, call it luck…whatever name you hang on it, destiny is a force to be reckoned with. And while it can be a scary thing, it can also be beautiful. I mean, just look at First Order LEGO‘s Hand Of Destiny. This monochromatic vision in bluish-grey LEGO may not evoke feelings of giddiness, but it still is a lovely thing to behold.

There are a lot of great textures in play in the base and fingers, but to me the real star of this build is the tree’s foliage. Those are hundreds of 8mm wheel rims. If you look very closely, you can see that they’re attached using various 1×1 clip plates. There has to be some very interesting architectural support hiding under those rims, too.

Hand Of Destiny

I’m always struggling to find good uses for all the LEGO wheels that accumulate in my parts bins. Maybe the techniques in play here can help inspire some creations of my own. And if not, that’s got to be the case for some other builder. Destiny demands it!

A cabin in the woods

LEGO creations often make me want to experience what’s built but in the real world. Carter Witz’s Mountain Cabin really makes me want to get out into the wilderness and go hiking. Sure, you can’t really feel the temperature of what’s depicted in a photo, but the hue of the green grass and the orange leaves on the trees peg this as an autumn scene. The trees tell me there’s a slight breeze too. And for some reason, I think it’s an overcast day. If I slip and fall into the cold mountain runoff in that stream, I’ll have no problem warming up in the snug little cabin. Aside from all the wilderness feels I’m getting, I need to also take a moment to appreciate the quality of these birch trees. The technic pins take them to a whole new level, making it look like the bark is falling off along with the leaves.

Mountain Cabin

Welcome the lunar new year with this festive LEGO tree

Vietnamese builder Khang Huynh is welcoming in the lunar new year with a beautiful LEGO bonsai apricot tree packed with new ideas. One of the best things about LEGO is that its elements can be repurposed nearly endlessly, limited only by your imagination. Here Khang has used several propeller pieces to sculpt the large, delicate petals of the yellow apricot blossoms that dot the tiny tree. Don’t stop looking there, though, take a close look for other wonderful reimaginings, such as ski poles, horns, and even a stud shooter.

Chậu mai 30 - Apricot Blossom in Lunar Newyear days

A LEGO bonsai to admire

The art of bonsai, or tray planting, much like LEGO building can be a very meditative process. Hours and hours can go into the finished product, and meticulous study and practice can lead to a true masterpiece of patience and careful work.

In this wonderfully detailed tree by Know Your Pieces that combines both, there are some small details worth pointing out. I love the use of tiny cherries as small berries under some of the leaves. The twisted brown whip wrapped around the middle is also a nice choice. And the bowl and stand work very well together to provide the perfect display. Altogether, it’s just how a beautiful bonsai should be.

Have yourself a very classic Christmas

If Hallmark decides to get into the LEGO holiday card market, Aukbricks has created a warm and inviting scene that would be welcome in any mailbox. The hardwood floors, white molding, and candles on the wall offer us a nostalgic vision of an old world home. Meanwhile, the holiday decorations are color-coordinated in classy white and gold – right down to the gift boxes under the tree. According to the builder, this digital render utilizes existing LEGO elements and consists of nearly 4,500 pieces. Try packing all of that in a holiday card!

Merry Christmas!

Happy little trees

You know about Bob Ross, right? If not, the short version is that he was an amazing painter, best known for his peaceful and calm teaching method. Quite often, he would fill his canvasses with “happy little trees,” conjuring entire forests with just a few elegant brush-strokes. Builder Emil Lidé (Full Plate) has a similar talent, creating trees with a flair and minimalist style that evokes nature with just a tiny selection of LEGO elements.

Not satisfied with just one tree, Emil has created seven distinct varieties for us to enjoy.

Microtrees

All seven are great, but there are a couple of standouts that I wanted to take a closer look at. (All seven are detailed in the builder’s Tree Techniques album on Flickr.)

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The amethyst bonsai

Purple treeze all in the ground. Don’t know if they’re growing up or down. Is it crystal or purple ice? Whatever it is, Duncan Lindbo built a tree that’s nice. Queue Jimi Hendrix guitar solo – Duncan’s magical-looking tree is constructed from transparent purple Bionicle elements, which are lit throughout to give it a sparkly, crystalline appearance. If something could be grown from a shard of the Dark Crystal I’d imagine this would be it!

If you’d like to see more of Duncan’s work in purple, be sure to check out his loathsome worm we featured back in September.

Finding peace with plant pieces

Nothing says peacefulness like a bonsai tree. And what better way to cultivate the perfect tree than to use LEGO to make it just the way you want it? From it’s beautiful base to the winding trunk, Brent Waller‘s bonsai is a picture of serenity. The shape is gorgeous, especially paired with the clean rockwork. The bridge and little fisherman are cute too!

LEGO Ideas Zen Bonsai

Brent is also the creator of something completely different, but also 100% epic. He’s the fan designer of the LEGO Ideas set 21108 Ghostbusters Ecto 1. Additionally, you’ll need to zoom in on every detail of his incredible Wayne Manor and Batcave.

Just the LEGO tree you were looking for

When it comes to fun landscape techniques, Emil Lidé has you covered. This tree made out of slopes is whimsical and creative. For me, it’s a little mesmerizing. It almost looks like it has been turned into 3D fractals!

slopetreeBut this is just a small sample of Emil’s handiwork. He’s not only an expert at building unique flora, he is gracious enough to create instructions on how to build them. His free instructions for both the trunk and canopy of this tree are on his personal website fullplatebuilds.com. You can also check out our article about one of his part experimentations, or another featuring multiple techniques in a single build.