Tag Archives: Furniture

Just take apart to make some truly “flat pack” furniture

No, this isn’t a product shot out of an IKEA catalog. This is a LEGO creation by Heikki M. If you’re like me, though, you had to look twice to be sure. The construction may be straight forward, but there are lots of details that really sell this as a human-scale object. The variation on the heights of the candlesticks, the well-chosen seams on the metal shelving, and even the hand-hold of the storage crate match what the eye expects to see. My particular favorite is the potted plant. Those are nested Technic wheels and 3-leaf plants. Recognizing those elements made me realize the smaller-than-actual-size scale of this build, which was a moment of mental adjustment. And let’s not neglect that abstract-art print. Ribbed 1×2 bricks create interesting textures, but still “read” as a flat image thanks to that tiled frame. It’s really clever building all around.

Shelf

This isn’t the first time we’ve featured amazing miniature architecture from Heikki, and I doubt it’ll be the last.

You’re so vain, I bet you think this model is for you

The Victorian era saw a celebration of the gothic, the elaborate, the ornate, across everything from architecture to wallpaper, from calligraphy to crockery. The period saw a revival of the baroque and rococo styles popular a century before, and furniture design was no exception. This Victorian Vanity Set is a collaborative build by brothers Tong Xin Jun and J.J.Tong. It delivers an amazing recreation of typical rococo styling. The black structure provides an excellent backdrop to the gold detailing, and the white top gives plenty of space for some well-built beauty “equipment.” Don’t miss out on a closer look at the make-up gear, particularly those perfume bottles and the flowers — lovely designs. The seat upholstery is an easily-overlooked highlight of the build, and it’s a great bit of work. Yes, this is a digital build, and I’d be worried about the stability of that mirror frame in “real life,” but it’s a beautiful creation all the same. Great stuff.

LEGO mirror beauty retro

Netflix and chill

With a global lockdown in full swing, it’s a sure bet that most of us are seeing more of our TV screens lately. Heikki M. has presented his TV and living space. Here we see a clean, brightly-lit, nicely-appointed modern space with a flat-screen TV, wood flooring, and a handsome accent wall. The stereo system and the low entertainment center are both meticulous in style and design. What is it doing being featured here on The Brothers Brick? Can you spot the LEGO? It took me a minute.

Television

It would seem Heikki is quite adept at building interior spaces.

Tinkle the tiny ivories with this teeny piano [Instructions]

Already built an awesome LEGO pool table with yesterday’s instructions? If you are now looking for the next perfect addition to your LEGO pool hall model, or just want to add a touch of class to any interior scene, why not build this adorable upright piano along with Tiago Catarino?

LEGO Piano

Watch the video instructions to find out how to build your own.

Build your own minifig-scale LEGO pool table [Instructions]

When it comes to essentials for any man-cave, bat-cave, den, rec-room, or game room, the pool table should be high on your list. Now you can build a LEGO one for your next scene using these instructions by Tiago Catarino.

LEGO Pool Table

Click to see the instructions

A smorgasbord of patterns

LEGO builder Peter Ilmrud takes us on a journey to very well appointed baths somewhere along the Mediterranean seaside. Although the model is adorned with all a trove of repeating patterns, the first one to draw the eye is the inlaid tiling in the new coral color, making use of the Friends marine life creatures, which come packaged together in a variety of Friends sets. The tablecloth is also worth noting, with its ornate pattern drawn from Bruce Wayne’s manor. And how many of you recognize the perfume bottle on the table — or for that matter, its light green color?

A countryside cottage to call home

17th Century Europe was a period rife with change, from feudal powers to the birthing stages of parliament. It also brought with it a decline in houses constructed of wood, giving way to stone and brick-built abodes. Benjamin Calvetti has replicated this style with stunning class, and his English Cottage is jam-packed with lovely details. The continuity in stone work, from the bordering fence line to the walls of the cottage, speak more of the local quarry than they do of a random handful of LEGO bricks.

English Cottage (main)

See more pictures of this quaint cottage, including a fully furnished interior!

Rats and spiders and snakes, oh my!

This terrifying vignette by Victor has a lot of phobias on display: arachnaphobia, ophidiophobia and even musophobia! It is titled “Nightmare” and that is quite an apt description. Waking up in a room of creepy critters is pretty high up there on my list of nightmarish scenarios.

Nightmare

The spiders, rats and snakes dominate this little model but it’s the room with its furniture and details that are really the stars of the show. All the furniture is expertly done and gives the room a modern feel. The black and white cabinet on the left with its doors of varying sizes, the white bedside table and the plant stand are particular stand outs. The lamp in the corner is also nicely crafted. The bed is a terrific little build with some creative parts use to make the rumpled blankets and give the illusion that the minifigs are tucked not-so-safely in their bed.

Nightmare - Details

Then there are the little subtle details. The phone charger is a brilliant touch along with the above-bed light switches and glasses on the brown bedside table. They really make the room feel lived in. The use of Olaf’s buttons tile to make an electrical outlet is particularly inspired. The printed tiles used to make the rug have been used in quite a few Star Wars and Nexo Knight’s sets, and the repetition of it makes the perfect floor covering. The attention to detail even extends to the bedhead on the sitting minifigure.

Good luck trying not to think about this as you’re falling asleep tonight. In the immortal words of Elvira, “Unpleasant dreams!”

There was a time when TVs did not have remote controls

TVs without remote controls meant that you had to walk to the TV to change channels. And sometimes you were the voice-activated remote controls–a direct order given by Mum or Dad to ‘change the channels’. Johan Alexanderson transports us back in time with his memories of yesteryears and the unboxing of the new family TV with a nice effect of foam peanuts spilling out. While the TV has the center of attraction, there’s also the box of distraction. What’s not to love about the giant cardboard box that came with it? The box and all those foam peanuts were also a form of entertainment. Fun fact–the cardboard box was inducted into the National Toy Hall of Fame in 2005, not long after LEGO was inducted in 1998. Long live LEGO, the TV and the cardboard box!

A family has bought a new TV during the 70s

A splash of red

Building realistic-looking home decor is a niche that Heikki M has been a master of for years. The use of scale, colors, lighting and the absence of LEGO minifigures all factor into the illusion that you are looking at a real-world space. This latest model is directly inspired by furniture website photograph. LEGO bricks have never looked so comfortable.

A Splash of Red

Take it easy for a little while

Everything appears chill and cozy in Heikki M’s LEGO scene of an attic apartment room. The attic implied with the sloped ceiling and the brick wall in the back of the room are top notch techniques in a scene full of fantastic detail to take in. I also appreciate the use of textured bricks in the rug. Is it suggesting a raised texture, or someone who walked through? You decide, but it’s great either way.

Night in the Attic Apartment

Home of the Brick and Famous

If IKEA ever needs a reference for a builder to lead a creativity department for their recent collaborative announcement with LEGO, I’d nominate Heikki M. in a heartbeat. He has a knack for building and photographing realistic-looking homes that make you take a look at a build twice just to make sure it’s all built with bricks. This particular scene is of a Manor Hall with a grand piano as a central feature. Little details such as the subtle patterns for the cornices give it the subliminal cues of a real home. All we now need is a piano player playing Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata to give life to the room.

Manor Hall