Tag Archives: Fairy Tale

I’ll huff and I’ll puff!

As a kid, I always loved Disney’s version of the three little pigs. Alego alego managed to capture the big bad wolf in all its wickedness. I am always a fan of a creation that looks as if it is in motion. This LEGO creation is a wonderful example of one that evokes movement. A couple of things attributed to the idea of motion in this creation. Let’s start with the Wolf. His pose is very dynamic as if we caught him mid-action. The builder use of the boulder bottom for inflated cheeks is quite clever. The rock fingers and the polygon wedge top mimic fur brilliantly.

Book The three little pigs

But not just the pose of the wolf evokes movement. We’re at the first little pig’s home. The one who has built his house with straws. The wolf just delivered his iconic lines about huffing and puffing and blowing houses away and he is now in the middle of the process. The straw flying everywhere sure looks amazing! All of the vegetation is bending in the same direction as the straw is flying. Even the books pages are moving along with the huffing and the puffing of the wolf.

A scraggily troll lives under a scraggily bridge

When I think of building with LEGO, the first thing that comes to mind is building with bricks. Jessica Farrell has taken that to the next level, and built a bridge out of bricks, that themselves are built with LEGO bricks.

Troll Bridge

And these brick-built-bricks ain’t your standard sized bricks either – they’re all kinds of odd shapes, cobbled together to build a bridge with character. Some have moss growing on them, there are even weeds poking out through the cracks. The vast array of different parts used give the bricks and bridge a quite amazing texture. Underneath the bridge you’ll find your standard bridge-hider-under, an ugly troll, ready to eat whatever goats go trip-trapping over his bridge. Luckily both sides of the river are quite lush. I really like the healthy-looking lime and green grass, as well as the custom-cut lengths of flextube for reeds and bulrushes.

Rapunzel, Rapunzel, let down your…long chain of bricks

A classic fairy tale gets the LEGO treatment with this towering six foot tall brick-built minifigure-scale structure created by Martin Harris and inspired by the Disney film Tangled. Not only do we get the famous tower in this work, we also get a nice landscape – the forest in which Rapunzel was tucked away, complete with colorful trees and a nice riverbed utilizing many nature-inspired elements including flower pieces, plants, and tree-limb elements in varying colors.

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The better to eat you with!

We all remember the tale of Little Red Riding Hood, right? There’s a part where Little Red says to her wolf grandmother “my, what big eyes you have”. To which she retorts “the better to eat you with”. Wait, that didn’t turn out right. Anyway, the point is old people are scary! PaleoBricks mixes Bionicle with “regular” LEGO to build the wolf in grandma clothing quite nicely. The shawl is a great touch as well as the…um…grandma hat. Grandmas still wear those, right? The wolf’s expression looks like he really does want to eat you…with his eyes. It has been a while since I’ve read the story but I’m sure it also involved doilies and a dish of Werther’s Originals. And a ticking clock, a VCR, and one of those creepy pictures of Jesus that moves when you walk. Old people! Am I right?

"The better to eat you with!"

Unsettling figure will haunt your dreams

Sometimes the most effective LEGO creations are those that skillfully employ a sparse economy of parts. This creepy figure from Cezium does exactly that–building genuine character from a handful of pieces. Whilst this (blind?) old lady appears to be only gathering herbs, her eyeless visage and the skull-bearing staff create a real sense of unease. I suspect there’s nothing but a frame beneath the cloth habit, but it doesn’t matter, as what is visible is well done. The face (built from an upside down Raptor body no less!) and the skull are excellent, and the use of spider leg parts for the staff’s tips is perfect. Couple the model-building with atmospheric photography and you have a wonderfully unsettling LEGO creation.

Baba Ludmila

Baba Yaga’s black woods

Baba Yaga is the enigmatic mistress of eastern-European folklore, haunting the forests and bestowing spells of good or ill on those bold enough to seek her out, or foolish enough to stumble upon her. Finding Baba Yaga’s home takes a striking amount of bad luck, though, as her home runs about on chicken legs. In Bricksom Parsom‘s LEGO scene, however, a small girl has done just that by wandering into a section of woods gone sour.

Baba Yaga's garden (better quality)

The twisted trees and blackened plants are excellently wrought from a variety of elements, on the most interesting being the Nexo Knights mechanical spiders used as grey flowers and a flail as another. The rickety cottage also looks great, with a mix of round tiles for a sickly, bubbled roof.

My, what big eyes you have Grandma

Built around BrickHeadz style figures, this lovely sketch of Red Riding Hood by Cindy Su features an adorably ferocious wolf and a strikingly vibrant granddaughter. The little scene is mostly a setup for the characters, who have some great techniques, and thankfully Cindy has some pictures of the characters on their own, too.

小紅帽(Little Red Riding Hood)

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Which raven do you choose?

Most of us are familiar with princesses kissing frogs in fairytales to save their beloved from a curse, but this build by Revan New introduced me to a different, unique story, in which the girl is tasked by a sorcerer to guess her lover amongst four of the sorcerer’s apprentices, turned into ravens.

Quest

The creation is not a perfectly “realistic” recreation of the fairytale scene, as Revan adds expressive, artistic accents to the build. The snow on the edges of the beautifully constructed walls seems to have little logical relation to the scene itself, instead capturing the atmosphere and emotional aspects of the story. A few splashes of brown help to break up the build colour-wise without making it inapropriately cheerful, and the window is especially well integrated into the wall. The figures are well built too, with great details like the sorcerer’s boots and belt buckle, but most importantly, they are very expressive.

Take your seats, folks – it’s time for a fairy tale!

The traditional fairy tales my parents read me and some of the old Basic LEGO sets are probably the biggest impressions of my childhood. And when these two things meet, it really touches my heart. As did this simple illustration of a traditional Russian fairy tale Emelya and the Pike by Dwalin Forkbeard. The story tells of an ordinary fellow named Emelya who was notorious for his indolence. Once he was lucky enough to catch a fairy pike who made all of his wishes come true. My favorite episode of this tale is Emelya riding his self-driving stove around his village. And here is the traditional stove exactly how I imagined it as a kid! Bricks with masonry profile work just perfectly for this kind of build, not to mention smart use of handcuffs as a shoulder yoke.

Emile and the Pike

Baba Yaga and her Chicken-Legged Hut

Captainsmog presents a wonderfully illustrated scene, telling the story of Baba Yaga and her chicken-legged hut. There are many versions of the fairy tale, and like any good story, the details are where the weirdness begins. Is there one Baba Yaga? Three? Why do all of these stories involve cannibalism?

I invite you to look long and hard at this wonderfully constructed witch’s hut and check out the wonderful details.

Chicken-legged hut

Fee, Fi, Fo, Fum

Brother Steven artfully captures the moment a home intruder breaks in and steals the owner’s valuables, before subsequently escaping and murdering the wronged homeowner. I never quite got the moral of that story.

I particularly like the expression on the giant’s face in the picture above, but be sure to check out the full shot for the fantastic details.

Seeing Red

This edgy version of Little Red Riding Hood, by Evan B., depicts her in the midst of an anti-wolf vendetta. This build is quite striking. I think this is a case where the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. The girl is nicely done, the landscaping is good, the wolf and the blood effect are well-thought out but when all the elements are put together something special emerges. I get a real sense of the character and her pain when I look at this build. Well done, Evan, well done.

Little Red.

This was built as an entry for the annual MOCathalon on MOCpages