Tag Archives: Markus Rollbühler

It’s a fairy tale in microscale

We’re all familiar with the story of Jack and the Beanstalk. Probably everyone reading this can sum it up in just a few words: Magic beans, giant’s castle, golden goose. But how many of us could tell the story in brick form as well as Markus Rollbühler has? Considering this vignette sits on just a 12×12 footprint, it’s amazing how much technique is packed into it. From the books and their detailed pages, to the microscale farmland, to the magic castle in the clouds. I’m particularly enamored with the use of Clone Trooper helmet antennae as a windmill. And that brick built “J” replicating a medieval drop cap is the sort of detail that makes this small vignette a giant-sized success.

Jack and the Beanstalk

More than a room with a view

In a world where steampunk hot air balloons and sky-pirates exist, there is a need for sky-based communication and supply stops. This cozy LEGO “Cloud 9 Outpost” built by Marcel V and LEGO designer Markus Rollbüler is just the place. It may be cobbled together, but it’s home-sweet-home to its humble inhabitant and his trusty pup. He also has to be picking up all sorts of reception with so many satellites and antennae! There’s lots of funky and fun parts usage here, but I particularly like the minifigure goggles used as bench legs.

Cloud 9 Outpost

This could be a place for a weary traveler to find respite or just a solitary lookout. Who knows? But what I do know is that there are many more builds to see by Markus and Marcel!

Elvish minstrel serenades woodland creatures

This fun LEGO build from Markus Rollbühler was created as a reward for the fan challenge Summer Joust 2021. The color choices work well together, and there are some creative parts used, like minifigure hands and feathers for the birds, and the cat tail piece used for the squirrel’s tail. I especially love the orange/white balance between the tree and the minstrel.

Summer Joust 2021 Prize: Creating an Atmosphere | Woodland Minstrel

A duel for the ages

This epic showdown of martial prowess comes to us from Markus Rollbühler, and it’s chock full of drama, action, and enough clever parts usages to keep your eyes busy for a long while. There are so many to love, but don’t miss the minifigure armor for the torso on the left character, or the big figure arms used as legs on the right character, or even little things like the rounded end of Harry Potter wands for knobs on the dresser in the background.

Broken Peace

In fact, we love this build so much we’ve made it our social media cover image this month! Be sure to check out how your image could be featured for a full month.

TBB Cover Photo for July 2021: Broken Peace

It doesn’t matter how many martial arts-based fantasy films you may have seen… or how deep your understanding is of the deep worlds within the stories of speedy fight scenes, this build by Markus Rollbühler brings a new dimension to the iconic fight scenes we all instantly recognise with LEGO bricks.

Broken Peace

From the illusion of flowing costumes through to the dynamic poses, we are all sitting on the edge of our seats, awaiting the infamous “KLANG” of the weapons colliding in the mid-air showdown. And to add to this technical build, once your eyes have absorbed and comprehended the central figures, you will find yourself looking deeper. It is then at this time that you will begin to notice the background. The intricate details of embellishment that have gone into each wall, table and window piece. Take a step back from this moment in time and sit on the edge of your seat once more… preparing for the battle that is about to explode. Lucky for us, Markus has ensured that this build has it all immortalised in this frozen dynamic scene of pure beauty, energy and storytelling.

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Carrot Top, Idol of millions

Idols are meant to inspire, but all too often they’re shown after centuries of wear and neglect, stripped down to the wood or stone that serves as their core. But Markus Rollbühler shows us a totem in full splendor in Jungle Idol. The bright colors are all sourced from uncommon parts like red paddle-ends and wakeboards, blue wrenches, and, yes, a halo of carrots. There’s also a splash of teal in the central disc and arms that makes me grin.

Jungle Idol

Markus notes that Emil Lidé came up with the technique for the palm trees – a gracious touch that speaks to how the LEGO community can inspire each other, even at the highest levels.

Mission Impossible: Prospector Edition

With a skillful use of only 101 elements, Markus Rollbühler takes a deep dive into adventure with 101 Bricks: Dangerous Descent. There are tons fun details, but did you recognize the rocky Bionicle baseplates (turned on their side) that form the walls? I also love the use of monochrome minifigures as carved statues in the background. Looks like there’s some history behind the golden T-Rex. (Hold on. How did an ancient culture know about T-Rexes? Man, this build is just full of mysteries.)

101 Bricks: Dangerous Descent

This build is actually a continuation of the story Markus started in 101 Bricks: Discovery. The part limit comes from the RogueOlympics, a contest that has lead to a lot of great featured builds. Check our archives out for more compact goodness from the event!

A small guardian of the forest with a big heart

You don’t have to be big to have a big job, as this epic 101 part model of a forest guardian by Markus Rollbühler proves. The flower at the heart of the model is just one of many perfectly placed flower and leaf elements, but there are also some great “building” tricks, like the curved brown sloped parts used for the lower arms, which are gently wedged into the undersides of those wonderfully bulbous sleeves. And the hands and ankles, which use clip plates tucked into the underside of the arms and feet. A soft glow added to the staff give the finished figure a magical finish.

101 Bricks: Woodland Warden

Up, up and away, in a rocket to the moon

If you’re looking for a masterclass in clever parts usage, LEGO designer Markus Rollbühler might be one of the best professors out there. This rocket, which uses 101 parts, is a prime example. Besides the fact that it’s very cute and looks neat as heck, it’s more than that. With such few parts, you have to make an impact. The best details include a fencing foil to cap off the nose, a trophy for the nozzle, and a beard and carrot combo for the flames. Let’s also not forget the clamshells, helmets, and chef’s hat playing peekaboo in the exhaust cloud.

101 Bricks: Liftoff!

If you need another example of Markus’s talent, look no further than 71741 Ninjago City Gardens. That’s right! He designed that too! But while you’re here, why not also check out more of Markus’ awesome “non-work-related” builds, in addition to some more cool rockets and spaceships?

Spires in the Skies

Markus Rollbühler surprises us with a creation that could be straight from a fairy tale. Inspired Terry Pratchett, Markus created this giant turtle with a settlement on its back. The turtle is a lovely build, using owls for legs and acorn tiles for eyes. The best thing about this creation has to be the use of the ninja neck scarf to create the dome roofs of the settlement and the smalles airship (which is cute as a button). The bigger airship uses a combination of the magnifying glass and the barbell weight. After seeing these I want to build an entire fleet of cute little airships.

101 Bricks: Spires in the Skies

Fire burn and cauldron bubble

I personally am a minifigure scale builder. I never tend to navigate to building on a different scale. This does not mean that I do not appreciate when other builders do. Markus Rollbühler made an amazing creation on, what I’d guess is, Belville scale. There are quite a few LEGO parts used in an original way. The cauldron is made by turning a big tire inside out. The bubbling effect is created by using the new cake icing and a sausage doubles as a spoon ladle. The big table uses tree trunks as table legs. Simple yet really effective. However, the best design has to be the mumbo jumbo of parts used to create a beautiful white owl. The chima eagle head was used for the head. The Yeti head was used as the body of the bird and the wings were made out of a combination of the fur collar and the large figure pads. Last but not least, have you seen the globe with sausages used in the globe holder?

101 Bricks: Magical Misfortune

A breath of fresh air. Sorry. I meant fire. A breath of fire.

Transparent LEGO elements are the best LEGO elements. Fight me. Or better yet, fight this amazing flaming dragon by Markus Rollbühler . Using only 64 bricks, this is one build that’s hot hot hot. The flame elements in the wings are easy to recognize, but there are also some more uncommon parts in there, too. Look close and you can spot a saw blade in the base, snakes, more snakes, and a minifigure flame headpiece.

101 Bricks: A Breath of Fire

This is an entry into the third round of this year’s RogueOlympics, a contest that challenges builders to stay under a 101 part count. We’ve seen a lot of really clever creations coming out of this competition, so check our archives for even more  featured builds!