Tag Archives: Modular

LEGO released 10182 Cafe Corner in 2007, setting a new standard for large-scale modular buildings. Since then, LEGO has continued to release new structures in the modular building series — 10190 Market Street, 10185 Green Grocer, 10197 Fire Brigade, 10211 Grand Emporium, 10218 Pet Shop, and 10224 Town Hall as of 2012. Meanwhile, LEGO fans have adopted the “Cafe Corner standard” and built hundreds and hundreds of beautiful buildings that fit with the official sets. See some of the best here on The Brothers Brick.

The corner bookstore on Modular Street

If you’re in search of some excellent LEGO literature, then head on down to this corner bookshop modular by Flickr user thilo.schoen. I can’t quite put my finger on it, but this build reminds me of my many shopping trips through downtown Minneapolis in college. The façade of the building makes excellent use of depth. The insets of the arches, the windows set a half-stud in from the wall, and the grooved sand green bricks help break up the monotony of those repeated patterns. I love the detailing on the fire escape, displaying some strong work with bars and clips. But my favorite detail in the build has got to be the lampposts. Such a simple design, and yet it feels unique, and especially fitting given the style of the bookstore in the background.

City Books

The builder also provides some shots of the interior, showcasing the details of the bookstore, art gallery, apartment, and rooftop garden. The use of the art gallery’s logo on the interior and exterior is a great touch.

City Books

This is how the prose build

This modular LEGO bookstore from Lorddan413 is one I’d love to spend some time in! The unassuming storefront welcomes you in with the bright flower barrels and lit sconces. Once inside, the store expands and envelopes, not unlike a story at the opening of a book. The many windows give plenty of light for exploring the shelves full of books and knick-knacks. The books! Were this a shop I could visit, I’d be looking through each and every one of them. Lorddan413 creates the motley tomes by varying the use of plates, tiles, and slopes. The cat in the basement and the mouse hole it watches are a nice touch! In fact, the whole basement area is intriguing, what with the private stash of books and those bottles that seem rather scientific–or even magical. Maybe the shop owner dabbles in arcane physics? A mystery to explore with future visits. As if I needed an excuse to return to a bookstore!

8x32 Modular Bookstore

Taking nice part usage a bridge too far

Eero Okkonen isn’t a stranger when it comes to using LEGO parts in an interesting way. For this episode of LEGO nice parts usage the star is the rope bridge. A part first used in 1989 that only appeared in 13 sets. In this case, Eero used the rope bridge as an architectural detail over a gateway. Using trans clear 2×2 slopes for windows is a really smart little detail. We often see trans bricks used for windows but never slopes. Mostly because the side of the slope that is placed at an angle isn’t as clear as the rest of the brick due to its texture. Also, the tube in the middle of the brick is quite noticeable. Something you do not want if you are looking for a piece to represent glass. But not all glass is transparent and smooth. Sometimes glass is textured and semi-transparent or decorated in one way or another. The brown tower rooftop looks like an absolute hell to construct and it is nice to see how it matches the other little turrets with its sand green tip. I can not finish this article without mentioning the ingot bars used for brickwork.

Mesilinna

LEGO Monkie Kid 80036: The City of Lanterns – The Monkie Kid city we’ve been waiting for [Review]

Ever since the Monkie Kid theme first launched, there have been many amazing sets, featuring huge mechs and mech-like figures, bright and colorful fully over-the-top vehicles and accessories, and a whole host of villains and minions. But aside from a few small buildings, and a headquarters on a cargo boat, there has not been much in the way of shops or restaurants to populate the world the characters live in. All that is about to change with LEGO 80036: The City of Lanterns. A stacked city scene consisting of eight individual buildings attached to a two-level structure complete with an elevated train. I am super excited about this set, and can’t wait to break it all down for you.

The City of Lanterns comes with 2,197 pieces and will be available on January 1st, for US $149.99 | CAN $179.99 | UK £114.99

The LEGO Group provided The Brothers Brick with an early copy of this set for review. Providing TBB with products for review guarantees neither coverage nor positive reviews.


Read on for our full review of this dazzling city set

Maybe it’s a Donut Shop franchise.

I think it’s cool when LEGO builders are inspired to take elements of existing sets and spin them into their own creations. Alex Eylar began by surgically removing the Donut Shop from the 10278 Police Station, striving to keep the modular aspects intact. They then added an adorable bookstore to make the place even more inviting. It feels like the perfect corner to spend a chilly autumn morning exploring. Even if the replication of the Donut Shop suggests it’s more of a chain than a mom-and-pop operation.

Donut Shop & Bookstore

The interior of the bookshop is worth a closer look, too. Can you almost smell the scent of used books mingling with the baking from next door? I know I can.

Donut Shop & Bookstore

I was amused to find we had a tag for “donut” already – why not take a moment and check out how to make a donut from LEGO bricks? (Probably not how you’re thinking.)

Jazz to your next trip to the bank

This latest creation by Andrew Tate brings some 1920s style to a staple modular of any LEGO city. Standing at four stories tall and topped with a clock tower, Andrew’s Art Deco bank has both the perfect color scheme and expertly designed architectural details. The light bluish gray concrete facade flaunts a variety of textures and geometric patterns, ranging from your standard 1×2 grille and log bricks to 1×1 pyramids and angled tiles. The use of SNOT with tiles achieves a sturdy look fit for a bank, while techniques like the slightly offset dark green cheese slope detailing and gold accents around the windows break that monotony.

Bank

Click here to see get a closer look at the details of this Art Deco beauty

11/12 Grimmauld Place – transforming Harry Potter build

Accio Harry Potter fans! This Harry Potter LEGO creation from Alan McMorran is a delight. Alan takes Grimmauld Place, featured as a transforming house in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, and expertly reworks the design to fit between Assembly Square and Pet Shop. It really does belong on this street from the dog sitting by the door to the exposed bricks to the white windows. When attention is drawn to the top of the building one starts to suspect that something’s a little…magical about this place. The windows look medieval and the color shifts to a somber combination of black and gray.

11 Grimmauld Place with Assembly Square &

The model is great, but this is where it truly becomes remarkable. The building can be transformed from 11 Grimmauld Place into 12 Grimmauld Place. Watch the transformation here.

Steps in Place Showing Storage

After the transformation. The difference in the smooth and studded walkways is a great detail. The skull and snake are very welcoming, don’t you think?

Harry, Hermione & Ron Arrive

A corner shop to rid all builder’s block

With the closure of shops and buildings, it’s been difficult for some builders to find their architectural inspiration. However, some have found ways to avoid that awful builder’s block. Drawing from both imagination and inspiration from Google Maps’ street view of Amsterdam, Thomas van Urk (aka Utanapishtim, aka Thomassio) has created yet another marvelous city modular. As always, this corner building looks incredibly clean and packed with architectural detail. Its dark tan facade is textured with masonry bricks, with a good balance of light gray bullions in its trim. The symmetry in the building overall is also incredibly satisfying to look at, not to mention the beautiful accented dark red windows at the front.

Corner Shop

Like this builder’s style? Take a look at Thomas van Urk’s Fright Knights tribute, which I assure, you will find frighteningly amazing.

There’s a house on my street, and it looks real neat

There are times when a LEGO fan starts building, gets into the groove of things, then finds it hard to stop. Especially when the build is a small street that keeps growing with each mini modular building placed on it. When I (Mansur “Waffles” Soeleman) attended my LUG‘s (LondonAFOLs) monthly meet-up via Zoom, the theme was mini modular buildings. Every year since 2007, LEGO released a large modular building, each of which can be arranged into a street layout. As a fifth anniversary to the lineup, LEGO created a microscale version of the first few buildings. I started to build a micro modular for the meet-up, and then I couldn’t help but build more. A few days after the meet-up, I ended up with a whole street.

The micro modulars of Jumper Road

Click to see each micro modular building in detail, along with the build process!

Hardware, home, and holiday cheer

When you think of a small-town hardware store during Christmas, this has to be what you think of. At least, this is the exact image that comes to my mind. Excellent at architecture and storytelling, the Midwest Builders have struck again with a modular worthy of LEGO store shelves. The line of detailed buildings is in dire need of a hardware store, and this fits the bill perfectly. If we were looking at images of the newest release, it’d be at the top of my Christmas wish list.

Hardware Store at Christmas

Click to see inside!

Designer Video of the LEGO Modular Police featuring Chris McVeigh and Ashwin Visser [News]

The annual anticipation of LEGO Modulars was unveiled last week with the showcase of a Police Station. We get the rare insights from designer Chris McVeigh and Ashwin Visser on the play features and fun easter eggs in the set.

Click to see the Designer Video

A morning in Paris

Start off the day by taking a stroll through the colonnade, grab a croissant and magazine from the newspaper stand, then head down to the underground metro. Now I could spend an endless amount of time imagining that I’m walking around in this LEGO modular row by Jean Macou. This delightful set of buildings is like Parisian Restaurant meets Assembly Square, but with an unlimited budget. Each building is more decked out than the next. Some of my favorite details include the gold and nougat color palette on the pub and small restaurant at the front. I’ve also been eyeing that sand green masonry brick building to the right and its gorgeous white trim and tan ground floor.

A peaceful street in Paris

Remove the floors to peek into the detailed interiors of the build. Here’s an inside look of the pub– its layout and color scheme achieve a next-level realism for architectural builds.

A peaceful street in Paris