Tag Archives: Cyberpunk

Tokyo’s Nakagin Capsule Tower in LEGO – a real-life cyberpunk building

Recreating Japanese architect Keisha Kurokawa’s Nakagin Capsule Tower in Tokyo’s Shimbashi neighborhood, Stefan Formentano has created a LEGO version of this iconic structure. While the capsules are similar in design, Stefan has added unique details to the individual living spaces, such as clothes hanging out to dry and signs of aging on the exterior. The lettering at the top of the tower is excellently portrayed and barely even looks like LEGO. At the bottom of the tower there appears to be a shady deal going on while peculiar characters roam the street. The stacked construction of the building is also oddly reminiscent of the LEGO House in Billund. This model is perfectly suited for a cyberpunk display while suggesting congested living conditions for the inhabitants of a futuristic city.

NEW HASHIMA(端島) - Sector 08 - Nakagin Capsule Residental Tower

Salvaging the Speedorz wheel

Sometimes a build comes along that makes you scratch your head. Some parts are just obscure enough that they’re hard for everyone to recognize. Of course, builders like Daniel Church like to go the extra mile to use an element that might not technically be its own element. Such is the case of these bright blue wheels, salvaged from the housing of some Chima ripcord bases. These Blue Bombshells are the latest Hyperious Choppers. Wonderfully compact and brick-built, these motorcycles are the perfect addition to a futuristic or cyberpunk-style build. Those hubless wheels and greebly engine sections contrast nicely with the smooth, colorful upper bodies.

Hyperious Chopper - Blue Bombshells

Loopy loopin’ teal devil

Teal and purple? What’s this, Technic battle bots from the 90s? This bright racer by Djokson is a rebuild of something just as old, if not more obscure. Continuing his rebuilds of the Xalax racers, he this time pays homage to 4568 Loopin, with a look that borrows design elements from popular pieces of pop culture. For example, the racer and pilot is a perfect blend of cyberpunk aesthetic with a bit of rugged and spiky Mad Max flair. It also uses the unique front wheel design of the spinners from the Blade Runner films and the Tumbler from Christopher Nolan’s Batman: Dark Knight trilogy.

Track Devil Loopin

Djokson is a master at NPU, especially with Technic and construction elements such as Bionicle. Loopin has less of that but is still old and obscure. Transparent orange electronic sensor piece from the LEGO Dimensions toys-to-life style videogame cover each wheel, bordered by a basketball rim from the LEGO Sports theme. Djokson also incorporated the printed pieces from the original Loopin set, which give this racer fun decals. The fairly new purple-coloured headphone pieces works well as a chin guard for the pilot’s helmet, as do the red accents. Djokson also achieved the small red rings in the tail and wrists of the pilot via unconventional ways: by cutting a ribbed hose. It’s not exactly an illegal building technique, as the instructions of some LEGO Technic sets do require you to cut ribbed hoses as well as pneumatic tubes.

Lastly, because I just have to gush about teal LEGO pieces: the Technic parts in this colour are fairly limited, but work perfectly in this build. I’m just wishing for more pieces.
Big teal Technic supercar when?

1-upping my childhood memories

When I was a kid, the closest I ever got to a real arcade was the game room in the back of the local bowling alley. Dirty carpet, a change machine that wouldn’t accept my crinkled dollar bills, and neon beer signs illuminating the TMNT machine that I could never get a turn at. I always imagined that somewhere there were kids living it up in a real video game paradise, and Brick Grayson has brought that paradise to life. Just looking at it, you can hear the cacophony of music and laser fire and cries of “hadouken!” that must echo through the place. The choice of colors does a great job of implying neon without there being any actual lights. And I particularly like the Pac-Man and Ghosts on the side of the building made mostly from sausages. If I could just get inside, I bet I could finally take a turn as Raphael.

Forget about cicadas! Watch out for the Wasps!

Builders love to show off their anime-inspired robots, mech-suits, and vehicles. Who can blame them? They’re just so cool! The classic Cyberpunk anime Ghost in the Shell sports tons of futuristic designs for inspiration. Last year, Marius Hermann showed off his model of the anime’s popular spider-bot, the Tachikoma. This year, he decided to bring us the wasp-inspired Jigabachi.

Jigabachi (from "Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex")

As always, Marius was quite selective with his parts to remain faithful to the original design. A white Bionicle mask is used to model a specific version of the Jigabachi’s cockpit. Minifigure hands in yellow and black provide detail on the tail as well as on the rotor mast. The color choices really pop! I mean, sand green is always a personal favorite but seeing the surfboard smoothing out the main body of the model is a treat! Printed 1×1 tiles add extra detail to the wing sections while bars and rubber bands come together as the Jigabachi’s turret gun.

Jigabachi (from "Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex")

The chase is on! It’s speeder bike versus speeder bike!

What’s better than one speeder bike? Two speeder bikes so that they can race against each other! -Disty- built a dynamic duo of hovering bikes with distinct styles and colours to match their pilots. They may be vengeful arch-enemies hellbent on destroying each other or just racing rivals here for the thrill of the chase. With the opposing styles and colour schemes, these two speeder bikes remind me of the old Technic battle bots from the late 90s.

Shinrai Technologies 'Orca' - Sport Bike

The tropical-themed Shinrai Technologies ‘Orca’ is a green mean speed machine piloted by a surfer dude. I love its lime green paint job that compliments azure waters and bright sands it flies above. Disty uses very clever parts usage with Hero Factory armour plates and robot minifigure legs as the secondary booster engines. I particularly like the usage of the transparent blue Bionicle eye/brain stalk as the headlight. It reminds me of the wheels of Legends of Chima Speedorz and even some Roboriders.

Rascal Motors 'DBL 790' - Urban Cruiser

The black and red Rascal Motors ‘DBL 790’ rules the night with furious speed. Despite the large Hero Factory spikes jutting out at all angles, this speeder bike retains aerodynamics to brave even the most congested cyberpunk air traffic. I love its angled look and greebly details; it looks like some creepy-crawly monster of the dark.

Surfer bike pays homage to a pioneer in LEGO racing

As a 90’s kid, I have an unironic love for early 2000’s LEGO products. The classic trendsetters, Star Wars and Harry Potter are well-liked. Others, like Bionicle, may be questionable by some but have their niche following. And then there are Galidor and Jack Stone, which most of the LEGO community looks down on. I love it all since it shaped my childhood and adulthood, and I’m thankful that builders like Djokson feel the same way. His latest creation, Smog Ocean Surfer, looks like just an ordinary, colourful sci-fi bike and rider. It doesn’t have anything to do with the themes I mentioned, right? Maybe a reimagining of Roboriders? Or maybe it’s more obscure…

Smog Ocean Surfer

I hope I wasn’t the only one who recognised the blue and yellow colour scheme with the grey, monster-like, and cute rider. I’m surprised I remembered the long-forgotten Xalax racers… This build is a reimagining of 4567 Surfer, a set from the first wave of LEGO Racers back in 2001. These small Xalax racers were LEGO’s answer to Hotwheels and similar McDonald’s Happy Meal toys with their outlandish nature. With their element and weapon-themed colour schemes, They felt like a non-Technic successor to Roboriders. The pilots were small, goofy chibi monsters were head and shoulders, and the cars had a slammer system to launch them.

I am the robot walrus

When I first heard about Mitsuru Nikaido‘s LEGO mecha walrus, I pictured a cyberpunk Beatles nightmare. But when I looked at how well-built and detailed it was, I was only impressed.

LEGO Mecha Walrus_09

What really sells this as a mecha walrus are the green eyes. They give off a ghostly computer-like glow that is creepy and makes the rest of the build look metallic. The tubing also helps, but without the eyes, I would have thought it was just a LEGO Technic-style sea mammal.
LEGO Mecha Walrus_11

The skin even looks like armor plating! Well done, Mitsuru!

Lighting up the bad guy, in the future

While the future sure looks bleak in cyberpunk LEGO builds, and the entire genre of cyberpunk in general, it still looks awesome. There are all the greebles a space-lover could imagine, atmospheric lighting, folks with strange hair; what more could you want? Sebastian Bachórzewski delivers a great example of this, using some third-party lighting elements in a brilliant way (yes, that pun was deliberate) to set the mood. And the posing of the minifigures is excellent, with the two of them in mid-leap, blasting away with their guns. It reminds me of a still from The Matrix, which makes sense, since that was also cyberpunk.

The Duel

It looks even cooler cropped closer, filling the screen with all the LEGO awesomeness and revealing the cinematography behind the build. And while you’re here, you should look at our collection of LEGO Cyberpunk builds.

The Duel

There’s more than a trace of creativity here.

The creator of this nightmarish image, Bart De Dobbelaer, has combined cinematic inspiration from Hackers and Tron Legacy with 22 meters of EL wire in Trace initiated – a chilling image of cyberspace done right. I’m not sure exactly what’s happening here, but it doesn’t seem to be good news. Is the creepy central figure reaching out with a red data probe to track a hacker? Or is the trace running the other direction? Could this be a friendly cyber guardian about to be compromised by the outside world? We may never be sure.  Where’s Flynn when you need him?? Either way, though, it sure is a spectacular scene.

Trace initiated

At that glorious greebling makes me want to break out my collection of tiny parts and get to building myself. And I’m pretty sure I still have some light kits around here somewhere…

Taking cyber-speed to the next level

There are fast bikes. Then there are superbikes. This cyberpunk styled “Warpwheeled Cryptobike” by Eero Okkonen sits atop the list. The brightly-colored, space-age racing bike is poised for domination, and those wheels – the back being circles of banana gears and the front being tiles fixed tightly to some medium tread – are slick. The newer version of the 90° elbow (macaroni) element, which is used on both the bike and biker more than once, has to be one of LEGO’s best in recent history.

Dedofiktion Racing Unlimited Warpwheel Cryptobike

When she’s not on her bike, the rider is flying high in her rocket suit. That’s right; those boots aren’t made for walkin’. She’s killing it with the color combo! The old-school elements used in the futuristic jetpack and shoes are my favorite part. Shoutout to the Avatar/ExoForce projectile on the hips.

Dedofiktion Racing Unlimited Warpplasm Turbothrust Rocketsuit

As always, we have loads of exceptional builds from Eero you can check out. This addition sits among so many awesome bikes and characters, it’s hard to choose a favorite!

Do you feel lucky? Well, do you, cyberpunk?

Some people like horror movies, because they like being terrified by monsters and gore. I don’t. I hate horror movies, in fact. Instead, I go in for cyberpunk, because I like being scared by a desolate tech-heavy future. Bleak metal buildings, an utter dearth of plant life, and gritty scrappers with doctorates in electrical, aerospace, and mechanical engineering (how else could you keep such sophisticated tech running, kitbashing decrepit robots and speeders on the fly, right?), are all the things that give me nightmares. And I love it. This LEGO scene by CRCT Productions hits that perfect cyberpunk sweet spot, with the immersive scene, the optimal balance between greebled and smooth surfaces, and the dim light with brightly glowing signs.

LEGO Cyberpunk Industrial Zone

I love the pipes on the left and the roller coaster track on the right, and that little orange-lit shop down the street gives the scene so much added depth and realism. The builder resisted the temptation to overpopulate the street, and instead carefully chose a few well-placed soldiers to give a dreary, not-quite-but-almost deserted life to the scene. Ok. Now that I’ve looked at this for a bit, I need to get outside for a walk in the park or read one of my many leather-bound books to get that future of technological horrors out of my mind.

Do you like this kind of stuff too? Then check out the cyberpunk archives of TBB!