Tag Archives: Nature

Mankind’s gift to the seas from which life arose

It’s easy for LEGO builders to focus on the happy, shiny world of little plastic people surrounded by fake plastic trees, but builder Emil Lidé doesn’t shy away from making a powerful statement with his latest LEGO creation. Did you know that every piece of plastic ever produced (yes, including all the ABS that LEGO is made from) will continue to exist indefinitely in the environment? That there is a floating patch of trash in the middle of the Pacific Ocean hundreds of thousands of square kilometers in size? Emil uses LEGO as a medium to remind us of the impact that our modern lives have on the planet we live on.

Garbage in Paradise (5 of 5)

As much as I love the message that Emil’s creation conveys, it’s also an excellent LEGO build on its own merits. The tranquil beach scene above the water contrasts harshly with the waste beneath the waves, from the usual tires and barrels to bicycles and even a washing machine.

Somewhere over Australia, rainbow birds fly

The Rainbow Lorikeet is a species of parrot found in Australia — unmistakable with its bright red beak and colourful plumage. Gabriel Thomson has built this fantastic LEGO rendition, complete with a tree branch to perch upon, and a little avian friend, a Superb Wren. I love the bright blue plumage of the Wren, a display of colour designed to attract the ladies in real life. Both birds have been well-shaped to give an accurate, natural appearance — no mean feat with plastic bricks instead of feathers.
Rainbow lorikeet and Superb wren - 1
If you want to see this model ‘in the brick’, it is on display in LEGO House — the new LEGO experience over in Billund, Denmark.

Birds in their little nests agree

Builder Josephine Monterosso once again demonstrates her flair for out-of-the-box building techniques with this beautiful bird’s nest. We’re used to seeing builds with no exposed studs, but this one seems to take the biscuit, lacking any normal connections whatsoever! Josephine jokes that “there are a few illegal techniques used here”. However, I don’t see any illegal techniques because this isn’t intended to be an official LEGO set.

We amateurs aren’t bound by same rules as LEGO’s designers. If we were, half the stuff you see here would never have existed. So be thankful that people like Josephine keep pushing the envelope on what’s possible with all these tiny little – and often highly flexible – plastic bricks.

A bloom opens, as the storm begins

One of the most prestigious contests in the LEGO community, the Iron Builder challenge, is once again underway. Grant Davis kicks off this round with a serene scene featuring a cute little bee and a lotus flower. The leaves are near perfect, but the flower looks more like Leontopodium alpinum than a lotus. Grant has apropriately titled his creation The Calm Before The Storm, and I cannot wait to see said storm bringing us more amazing creations to see.

The Calm Before The Storm

We’re gonna need a bigger rolled-up newspaper...

I always love builds that use a specific part to great effect. Case in point is Takamichi Irie‘s utilization of the wings from an Ant Man LEGO set on his macro scale hornet. The shaping of the segmented body and precise colour blocking is expertly done. Not to mention the lovely combination of technic parts and robot arms for the legs.

LEGO Hornet Macro Insect

The model appears to have a fair amount of articulation, allowing for some realistic poses. Couple that with some nicely presented photographs and these shots almost appear to be out of an entomology journal.

LEGO Hornet Macro Insect

LEGO Hornet Macro Insect

It’s time to flamenco with a flamingo

The word flamingo actually comes from the Spanish word flamenco, which came from the earlier Latin word flamma, meaning flame or fire. The name seems all the more apt for this LEGO Flamingo created by BrickBro given that it’s actually built from red bricks rather than pink. The posing of this bird is perfect, with one foot characteristically tucked up whilst the other wades through the shallow water. I love the dual purpose of the clear dish, which firstly holds the bird in a standing position, but also depicts a ripple in the water. Those stick legs look just as fragile as an actual flamingo’s legs.

Flamingo

This shapely bird has some clever, albeit illegal, techniques in the neck area, where the builder has used a short length of tubing to attach the tiles bottom-to-bottom. The model is built only from LEGO parts however,  and stands surprisingly steady on that one little stick leg.

Then nightly sings the staring owl

Owls are mainly nocturnal, solitary birds of prey who are known for their silent flight. Most birds of prey have eyes on the sides of their heads, but the owl’s forward-facing eyes facilitate their low-light hunting. Shawn Snyder has created a LEGO owl with plenty of attitude and a somewhat impudent glare. This is an owl who knows his position, with those piercing, hooded eyes, sharp talons on show, and wings spread wide in an act of defiance.

Owl_front

That’s a lot of character to be displayed by a brick-built owl – I feel watched.

Beautiful and dangerous

This entry for the ABS Builder Challenge by Brother Steven is simply prickle-licious. The dark red and bright yellow of the desert flower really make the creation leap out, contrasting beautifully against the green cactus. And those olive spines are so prickly they almost sting your eyes. This build is simple, elegant, and perfect. I love that it comes with a cheeky note from the builder: “A gift to my competition. Handle with care.” Brilliant!

Desert Flower

Art imitates life with a plastic pine cone

I am mesmerized by this delicate pine cone by Cecilie Fritzvold. I just can’t figure out how she built it! The branch of the pine tree completes this snowy scene. The branch is nearly as delicate as the pine cone itself. I love how this beautiful scene is built using simple parts, including clips and 3-stud long rods. The Nexo Knight’s shield as the pine cone’s scales works very well too.

Pine cone

Flower firepower

Billions of years from now, plants will have evolved numerous defence mechanisms to ward off hungry herbivores, but none as extreme as this hibiscus by Grant Davis. I love the perfect blending of organic and mechanical elements, which makes the creation look very realistic for a robot flower. The builder says this is practice outside the castle theme in which he usually builds. But with the new LEGO Nexo Knights series, the definition of LEGO castle may officially include robots now, too!

Hibiscus Cannon

You’ll remember me when the west wind moves upon the fields of green

Don’t you think there are too many spaceships and interstellar fighters prowling around the international LEGO space lately? Of course, their top-class designs are undeniable, but how about taking just a day off and spending it somewhere in a calm restful rural place? This vast diorama by Piotr Machalski, a talented builder from Poland, is full of soft summer sun and serenity. Even though the actual size of the build is 25 m2, it can hardly contain a huge century-old oak and just a little bit of a field by the farm.

Chronicles of dirt-poor farmer of- dirt,

Hurry up to see some brilliant close-ups of the diorama as the author promises to extend his creation with new territory.

Plow up guy

Towards thee I roll, thou all-destroying but unconquering whale!

It’s been many years since I last attempted to conquer Herman Melville’s masterpiece Moby Dick, and it haunts me to this day. And when I spy that inscrutable thing again on a shelf, to the last page I shall grapple with it. Japanese builder aurore&aube (aurore&aube) has conquered the white whale in LEGO form, with Moby Dick ascending from the deep to harry Captain Ahab and the Pequod. Using wedges and curved slopes, the builder has captured the essential shape of the sperm whale, Physeter macrocephalus. The red interior of his open maw is a lovely touch.

白鯨 010

Oddly perhaps, Moby Dick is a popular subject of LEGO models. Don’t miss Captain Ahab being dragged into the deep by Letranger Absurde and Ryan Rubino’s white whale battling a giant squid.