Tag Archives: louis of nutwood

Kingdom for a handful of dark bluish gray slopes!

Besides sharing fantastic creations through the front page of the Brothers Brick, I like collecting building ideas to use in my own models sooner or later. No kidding, I have a ton of folders with pictures and links to my favorite ideas in numerous genres. Castle is one of the genres I’m planning to explore, but I’ve been in search of a perfect vision — until today. Kallstark Stronghold by Louis of Nutwood might be exactly what I was looking for. The way the castle merges with the landscape puts this build on par with modelmaking masterpieces; obviously, a LEGO version lacks weathering, but the texture of the walls adds so much character. The towers’ and walls’ proportions may be questionable, but I’m a fan of the current composition. The castle looks a lot bigger than it is. And this is precisely how it gets a little bit of magic — I need to know what is happening inside!

A winter bonsai in isolation

In my experience, bonsai trees are kind of fragile. But this sturdy specimen from Louis of Nutwood isn’t phased by harsh weather.  With a snowy covering on the autumn-hued leaves, this tiny tree is ready for a long winter’s nap. I really like the evocative colors, the twisting trunk, and the tiny lantern on the edge of the pot.

Winter Bonsai

This bonsai started life as part of a larger build, Louis’ Toro Nagashi Temple. It’s a great example of how removing a section of a larger creation can completely transform how its seen; in the temple scene this is “just” a full-sized tree.  But recontextualize it and suddenly you’ve got a desk-sized botanical that could go head-to-head with LEGO’s own 10281 Bonsai Tree. Check out our bonsai tag for even more pint-sized greatness!

Miniature tree inspires an even more miniature LEGO model

Sometimes smaller is better, building with a limited selection of parts can lead to creative outcomes, like this simple but beautiful bonsai tree by Louis of Nutwood built around the curved animal part. The planter sits on a wooden tray just like the official LEGO Bonsai tree set, albeit using a mere fraction of the brown tiles.

Bonsai: Element experimentation (1/6)

Check out another tiny tree by the same builder

There’s something fishy about Skaldar Port

What is better than a nice medieval building made out of LEGO? An entire medieval city! Louis of Nutwood created Skaldar Port. A place that apparently is salty, damp and a bit stinky. It’s supposed to smell like fish. Even though it smells, it’s a place of hope for a lot of people who want a fresh new start in life. What makes this build amazing isn’t just its size. Each little building could perfectly work as a stand-alone creation. The stonework on the little houses is made with great attention to detail. There are a lot of different bricks used to depict the crumbling bricks of the building. From slopes to tiles to bricks to wedges. Using the same technique for the roof and the Tudor style throughout the build creates a uniformity to the creation that is really nice.

A not-quite fortress of solitude

Sometimes we all need a quiet place to rest and recharge from our hectic lives. LEGO builder Louis of Nutwood has imagined and built just such a place. With a cottage by the river and a nearby windmill to help with the chores, I can’t think of a better place to lay down under a tree and read a good book until you drift off to dreamland. Smoke billowing gently from the chimney is a sure sign of a warm hearth, maybe some freshly baked rolls, or a tasty pie are waiting for you. The detailed rock work and the outward-facing transparent tiles and plates round out this lovely little scene.

Quietude

Mitgardia should be beautiful this time of the year, all that snow.

This snow-covered tower from Louis of Nutwood was an entry for a contest on EuroBricks.com. For a scene that could be very typical, there are some fun and creative touches here, like the textured gray walls and archway on the lower right. One detail I didn’t notice right away is the use of green and yellow minifigure arms for the flag on top of the tower.

Build aside, it’s great seeing people who take pride in crafting a story that ties in. Here’s an excerpt from the Flickr description:

Before reaching the arch of stone that divided the two worlds, he looked over his shoulder, beyond the path that brought him thus far. He glared beyond the mountaintops and the grey sky.

The Last Eye

Is this Maleficent again or one of her cousins?

Making LEGO brick built animals is something I always struggle with. Especially when they have to be minifig scale. Louis of Nutwood has no problem with brick built animals. His creation features an amazing brick built dragon. Which has been done before quite a couple of times before. Louis used bricks to build the wings, which I’ve never seen before. Builders quite often make the skin between the fingers of the wings out of a different parts. Fabric, cloth, or plastic with a pattern. The wings look great and are quite poseable. The face looks absolutely divine and the action posing was done exceptionally well. The fire effect looks better than most tv-show CGI fire bursts which makes the water near the dragon ripple.

The Black Dragon, Svart Dyr

Microscale mission of mercy

A friend in need is a friend indeed, they say. Who is they? Probably Louis of Nutwood, for one, since he built this microscale LEGO scene of a relief ship unloading its supplies to help save a city near destruction. The ship itself is small and sleek, elegantly color blocked, and the harbor is great, too, with its large cranes to unload the supplies. The water deserves some extra attention, with the subtle variation in colors and the studs being used for waves near the shore. But more than that, the whole piece has an elegant composition, with the rocks, uneven edge of the water, and the clear central focus on the ship. What kind of ship? Friendship.

A sailor's solitude

Tear it up with these hard suits

Do you like traditional Japanese folklore? Do you like hard suits? Then, by golly, you can set your squeal-holes to positively delighted with this LEGO trio by Louis of Nutwood. The desert hard suit, aka “The Camel” has a strategically placed saw I would not want to tangle with in an alley, dark, or otherwise. The R.A.M.B.O. jungle suit is just the thing to tear it up in the underbrush while the low-temperature suit, known as “The Snowflake”, has a rocket launcher. You know, for the cold. Which is your favorite?

Hard Suits (Shinrai-Do)

Open the gates!

Builder Louis of Nutwood packs a lot of story in a small space in this snow-covered castle scene. This is part 8 of a wonderful ongoing series by Louis, and not only is it visually interesting, but there’s a written component that accompanies each part of the heroes’ journey.

Svalg Keep

In this chapter, a pair of weary travelers, one in dire circumstances, arrive at Svalg Keep to seek help from its residents. The castle is nicely sculpted and I really like the way it seems to spill off of the confines of the base. The small wooden structures are a fitting addition and do a great job of breaking up the mostly gray and white color palette of the castle. Adding more color to the proceedings are the snow-laden trees utilizing fall colors on their branches. It can be hard to work in a limited number of colors, but Louis excels at it here.
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