Tag Archives: Castle

Dragons! Knights in shining armor! Trebuchets & ballistas! From enormous LEGO castles buttoned up for battle to peaceful village market scenes, we’ve got your LEGO Castle needs covered right here.

The untamable beast of the underworld

This mythical scene by Henry F. evokes cold dead lands, riven with streams of smoking rock, populated only by those too unlucky or too cursed to be elsewhere. Here, a mighty beast lurks, and a band of hellish warriors surrounds it, hoping to catch a prize? Or perhaps unwisely seeking to tame it. Whatever their intentions, I cannot think this will go well for them.

Börzerk's Journey

Look closely at the stonework, for it is masterfully done, with just the right amount of profile “brick” bricks sprinkled with other pieces to create a crumbling edifice. The uneven base, which doesn’t sit flat, also lends to this vignette’s otherworldliness.

Börzerk's Journey

Soaring towers are the pinnacle of LEGO castle-building

Fresh from wowing us with his banana-roofed treehouse, alego alego has been building a range of microscale castles. This one is my favorite — a wonderful fantasy castle with soaring spires, surrounded by a crystal clear moat and a pleasant greenwood. This fortress wouldn’t look out of place in Hyrule, or the Magic Kingdom for that matter. Very nice use of the new “weapon spear tip with fins” part from Nexo Knights for the tower roofs too…

Micro castle

I’d recommend checking out alego alego’s photostream for more microscale castle goodness, like this one fit for any prince or princess.

Untitled

A blessing in the old chapel at Marbury Village

As we start wrapping up our coverage of the various LEGO Castle creations that were part of the Ye Old Merry Battleground collaboration by “InnovaLug” at Brickfair VA, we would be remiss in our duties if we failed to highlight this beautiful village by TBB alum Mark Erickson. Mark’s village includes two half-timbered houses and an excellent church in unconventional tan (sandstone, I presume). The church has sculptures in the same color as the structure — though in fact these would likely have been painted garishly when carved originally in the Medieval era — as well as a graveyard and a red roof with some subtle texturing.

Marbury Village

Mark’s extra pieces of rounded landscaping that sort of “drip” off of his main diorama illustrate the interesting approach that the InnovaLug team took to their collaborative display. Rather than integrating the various contributions on a single underlying brick-built landscape (as we did with our Battle of Bricksburg display), the team used white space between the builds to highlight each build separately. We tried this approach with TBB’s “ChronoCon” display at BrickCon a couple of years ago, and it’s not generally a style of collaborative display that I think works all that well — though InnovaLug seems to have pulled it off quite well by spanning the open space with little details like the smaller landscaping pieces here. What do you think of this display style?

Ye Old Merry Battleground BrickFair VA 2016

71040 The Disney Castle available now for LEGO VIP members [News]

It’s time to make all of your Disney dreams come true: 71040 The Disney Castle is now available to LEGO VIP members. The set has 4,080 pieces, 5 minifigures, and costs $349 USD.

71040 The Disney Castle

The set will be available to the general public beginning September 1, but the LEGO VIP Program is free to join, so you can just join and then order the set immediately to earn 349 points. That’s $15 toward a future LEGO order, and 49 points toward the next 100-point threshold for another $5.

Angry Birds are instantly recognizable in micro form

In a testament to the insane popularity of Angry Birds and the amazing skill of the builder, this microbuild by Letranger Absurde is instantly recognizable.

Despite the tiny size, the birds and slingshot are brilliant. I count nine pieces, and they perfectly encapsulate the birds. My favourite part usage here is the minifig slingshot which becomes supersized thanks to the scale of the scene. There are many more details, and I highly encourage you to scan the pig castle to see all the other little details for yourself.

Angry Birds

A dangerous race into new lands

I’m very excited to join the amazing group of builders over at the castle-themed, role-playing forum: Lands of Roawia. Castle is one of my favorite LEGO themes and lately I feel like I need a little push to actually sit down and build something. This chariot scene is my first LoR build and I had a lot of fun coming up with the main character. She’s extra grumpy and uses dark magic. The First Annual C.R.A.S.H. Games jumped out at me as interesting because it combines LEGO building with character creation using stats (along the lines of Dungeons & Dragons). The “Games” include a chariot race, archery, hurling, and a stealth maze run. I highly recommend checking out the forum yourself.

Helaine waits for the Chariot Race to Begin

Rumble at Cordington Courtyard

This excellent LEGO courtyard scene by David FNJ reminds me of an ancient Greek temple. Probably due to those amazing round columns and the open air design of the building. All this scene is missing to complete the Grecian theme is a couple of nude sculptures. In addition to those great columns, the roof on this structure is also quite nice. I’m not sure how David constructed it. But maybe you can figure it out by looking at the bird’s-eye view photo for the roof details.

Cordington Courtyard

Like a troubled bridge over water

On a bright spring morning, troops from two nearby castles converged at one of the bridges of County Madison. Fat trout could be seen swimming in the creek below, and all agreed that it was a prime spot for fishing. But no one could decide who should make the first cast. As things often went in the era of Castle, violence ensued and blows were traded. By the time the melee was finished, all the fish had been scared away. The moral of the story? Isaac S. makes pretty awesome medieval bridges.
Aindrea Bridge

A tall tower stands alone in the woods, looming

Farwin Castle by Brother Steven is one of the most striking pieces of castle architecture I’ve seen recently. This exceptionally tall, spindly tower still manages to capture an elegance of proportions, looking mysterious yet stately. Unlike many contemporary medieval themed builds, Farwin Castle doesn’t employ much of the precariously complex stonework that’s in vogue. Instead, its strength lies in its solid geometry and fascinating dimensions. You have to wonder what purpose this tower serves. The home of a lovesick, ascetic prince? The prison for a lunatic mage? The guard tower on a dangerous border? Whatever it is, we like it.

Farwin Castle

Brother Steven says this castle is part of a larger collaborative display, where multiple builders created locations from the same world, so don’t miss the fantastic stable from the collection that we already highlighted.

Farwin Castle

Medieval stable in a classic Castle-style

Isaac S. proves Castle models haven’t all moved into a world of ramshackle angled walls and twee color-schemes. Ignoring the prevailing fashion pays off wonderfully in this excellent little build — there’s great landscaping, a lovely depth of texture in the walls, and even a nice splash of color which manages to look realistic. To top it all, it looks like this model might stay in one piece if you turned it upside down — something you couldn’t say of many of the “wonky-style” Castle builds.
Cerulean Stables
The model looks almost as good from the rear. Check out that smart little stained-glass window…
Cerulean Stables

Duelling LEGO Knight with spurious shield

These duelling knights are clearly having a medieval difference in opinion, perhaps a pretty damsel in distress is the source of their angst? This vingette by DavidFNJ is a lovely little scene that has been photographed very well to demonstrate depth of field  and a perfect angle to make the viewer part of the action.  The colours used for the surrounding woodland and rocky areas are both realistic and attractive.

The Duel

Look at the anger on the Knight’s face, he means business. I imagine the other chap is actually distracted by his opponent’s unusual shield decoration, its not often you see the sprue (a piece of extra plastic holding two elements together as part of the moulding process) used  as an unofficial part!

I’ve got 3 cheese in my bag, good Sheriff!

This enchanting little scene of a medieval market and town gate is packed full of great little details and vibrant colors. I love how builder Bricktease has captured the feel of a bustling crowd on a bright morning, and I can’t help but be reminded of one of my favorite bluffing games, Sheriff of Nottingham, in which the Sheriff sits at the market gate and inspects merchants’ bags for illicit goods. “Honest, good Sheriff, I’m only bringing in chickens! No contraband here!”

The Market Gate - Overview Left

The Market Gate - Market 1