Tag Archives: Castle

Dragons! Knights in shining armor! Trebuchets & ballistas! From enormous LEGO castles buttoned up for battle to peaceful village market scenes, we’ve got your LEGO Castle needs covered right here.

Needle Town...sew perfectly balanced

The  Colossal Castle Contest continues and  Polish builder crises_crs brings us this perfectly balanced creation entitled Needle Town.

Needle Town

Needle Town is an entry to the Microscale Medieval Life Microscale Castle MOC category, in which entries must be built on a 16×16-stud or smaller plate.

Crises_crs has balanced this entire castle town on a tower of 1×1 light blue grey plates that rise up from an island. I love this unique take on building within a 16×16 plate, certainly an eye-catching entry.  In addition, the angled wall that encircles the town has a fantastical feel, like one of Saturn’s rings around the ‘planet’ where Needle Town rests.  The coloured houses and touch of greenery gives plenty of detail although my eye is constantly drawn back to that foundation tower of 1×1 bricks!

The roof, the roof, the roof is afire...

Following on from Jennifer’s recent post on waterfalls, here are some more creations with brick-built “special effects”. This ramshackle Laketown house by David Hensel features a convincing fireball rolling up from the roof…

Fire and Water

It’s difficult to depict fire with bricks without it looking like a pixellated explosion from the 8-bit era of gaming. I think David has pulled it off here, with the outer layer of transparent bricks and the darker colors at the edges simulating an expanding ball of flame.

I recently spotted another brick-built explosion which used very different techniques but created a similar sense of energy and motion. This fantastic tower explosion was part of Marc Gelaberto‘s pirate display at a show in Barcelona…

[MegaMOC] Fortaleza de Santa Catalina

It’s like a still from an action movie – the fireball blossoming, shattering the tower’s masonry as soldiers are flung into the air. Check out the priceless expression on this unfortunate soldier’s face!

[MegaMOC] Fortaleza de Santa Catalina

I’ve always shied away from building scenes like these, worried they wouldn’t live up to the image in my head. Seeing these great examples of fiery disaster, I feel some explosive action coming on in my building!

Don’t go chasing waterfalls

I’ve always found water to be particularly difficult to portray with LEGO. And waterfalls? Forget about it! But three builders over at Lands of Roawia have recently created stunning LEGO waterfalls. Each one has a sense of serenity and of course, falling, frothing water.

First up, aardwolf_83 created a lush waterfall using translucent pieces.  The “wet” rock under the falls are an excellent touch that adds to the overall realism of this build. And the bridge has a fantastic amount of detail. Be sure to zoom in and check out those columns.
Linvale Falls

Next up on our waterfall tour is Joshua‘s heavenly lagoon. The falls are constructed with your standard translucent pieces, but look close at that lagoon and you’ll see that Joshua utilized the jewel piece to create a sparkling body of water. And, if you view this build from the back, you can see that his cave contains stalagmites and sleeping bats.
Heaven's Lagoon, Lenfald LC 20

Last, but not least, Xymion created his waterfall with the “SNOT” (“studs not on top”) technique. Even with a completely smooth surface on the water, Xymion captured movement in his build by cleverly utilizing color gradation and strategically placing a few cheese slopes at the crest of the falls and on the shore lines. My favorite non-waterfall detail is (sorry fishies) that yellow daffodil plant.


Drop in, restless traveler! (if you’re brave enough...)

Seems like dark blue color is in command on The Brothers Brick this week: not only is it the tinge of time-travelers, but also stands for sapphire. Jaapxaap made a great decision by choosing it as the prime color for his latest Haunted Inn, which was created for this year’s Colossal Castle Contest. I must admit these flat tiles with eye pattern make me feel as disturbed as I do from that “friendly” ghost in the doorway.

CCC XIII - Haunted Inn - The Sapphire Inn

A distinctly British castle

As someone who likes to build castles out of LEGO, I know how tricky it can be to effectively construct round towers. It’s also a daunting challenge to find the perfect balance between too much detail in the build and not enough. Isaac Snyder posted this great example of how to achieve both of these delicate techniques earlier this week for the 13th Colossal Castle Contest.

LEGO Bodiam Castle by Isaac Snyder on Flickr

I’m not familiar with all the castles they have over in Europe, but I’ve seen Bodiam Castle in Britain, in picture books and websites many times. I think it’s especially neat when someone goes the extra mile and builds a close-to-scale model of a real piece of architecture.

I also liked this shot of the very detailed back with the towers and doors going every which way.

LEGO Bodiam Castle by Isaac Snyder on Flickr

The overall effect is very impressive.

Tested video features “Best Castle Building” from BrickCon

Tested made a visit to BrickCon this year and interviewed David Frank about his award-winning Manor House, which we featured here a couple of weeks ago. Check it out for some great background on a wonderful build!

The tiny city of Acrine

Most builders will admit that it’s much more difficult to build a small scene than a large one. But soccersnyderi makes it look quite easy with his 12 x 16 stud microscale castle. With an eye for detail, soccersnyderi has eliminated repetition in the building styles of his castle walls, houses, and foliage. The tiny waterfall even flows into a pool that gradates from choppy white waters to calm blue ones with the help of the always handy cheese slope.


And if you like this build, then you’re in luck! It’s up for grabs as one of the many prizes of this year’s Colossal Castle Contest.

Rowing home aboard the Anglo-Saxon ship of Sutton Hoo

Two things that I really like are history and LEGO. The combination of the two makes it all the better! James Pegrum, creator of the long running LEGO series History of Britain shows us his latest awesome historical LEGO build portraying King Rædwald returning home after a battle.

The Journey Home

Apparently the battle didn’t go too well. His dead son is on the same boat heading to the burial mounds. Better luck next time, Rædwald! The builder says his longboat was inspired by the 4th-century Nydam Boat excavated in Denmark and the 7th-century ship-burial at Sutton Hoo in England.

On a side note, this is an entry to the Medieval Ships category of this year’s Colossal Castle Contest.

Fantasy town is ratty but not too tatty

When Luke Hutchinson burst on the scene, he seemed to single-handedly reinvent how LEGO Castle should look. His creations introduced a level of detail, weathering effects, and off-the-grid angling unlike anyone else’s builds. I was lucky enough to see some of Luke’s stuff “in the brick” at the Great Western Brick Show in the UK a couple of years ago — it’s even better in real life than in pictures.

Skavenport Furriers

The style has rapidly become something of a standard for Castle, and for me, it now takes something special to catch my eye. This lovely build by Jacob Nion did exactly that. Jacob brings us a furrier’s yard – the latest in a great model series of Skaventown, a fantasy town with a mixed population of humans and the Skaven, Warhammer gaming’s rat people.

Aside from the obvious fun usage of hair, hats and capes as furs, what I like here is the feel of actual work being underway. All too often Castle scenes look over-posed and artificial, the figures little more than dressing for the buildings. As for Jacob’s buildings, the roofing and woodwork are excellent, and are set atop walls which actually look like weathered stone, rather than an emptying out of the builder’s brick bins.

Too often a desire for texture and detail can end in a messy creation, the eye pulled this way and that by unnecessary clutter. It’s a tricky balance, but I reckon Jacob has nailed it. What do you think?

Fall in a sky of floating rocks

Here’s a cheery little scene from Brother Steven, full of vivid colors and and delightfully simple skyboat. I love the fascinating mix of characters interacting here; they’re far more diverse than scenes like this usually dare portray, and the build is better for it, lending it credence as a festive autumnal market.