Tag Archives: Town

Towns in the world of LEGO have everything cities in the real world do — police stations, fire engines, trains, hairdressers and veterinarians. Check out all the beautiful buildings and vehicles we’ve featured here on The Brothers Brick.

A place downtown to meet your Friends

I love seeing Friends colors and sets incorporated into awesome builds, and Allan Corbeil has done a magnificent job with that. He’s given us a lovely Cafe Corner modular building, based on 41035 Heartlake Juice Bar.

Black and White photo of my Lego Modular Building MOC

While I love the black and white old-timey pictures, I have to share the stand-alone shot, too. The Juice Bar looks just lovely built into the ground floor of this brick building. The detail for the top floor is quite lovely and very reminiscent of the details that LEGO puts into other modular sets, particularly 10243 Parisian Restaurant and 10251 Brick Bank.

Lego Building #8

Pop into the Top Slice Bakery for a delicious pastry

There’s a longstanding tradition — especially here on the West Coast of the U.S. — of novelty architecture that often reflects the specific purpose of the building, from teapots to root beer barrels. Andrew Tate has built a lovely bakery in the shape of a toaster, complete with slices of bread popping up. And the coffee stand next door is, naturally, in the shape of a coffee mug. Andrew makes great use of rounded bricks and slopes throughout his scene, which even includes a brick-built street.

Top Slice Bakery

Udine, Italy’s Piazza San Giacomo in LEGO

Luca Di Lazzaro and the Italian LEGO club ItLUG have built a minifig-scale model of San Giacomo square in Udine, in northeastern Italy. Featuring over a dozen buildings surrounding the square and populated by numerous minifigs, the model even includes a row of Italian supercars for the minifigs to drive away in.

Lego San Giacomo Square

The model was on display in Udine at an event last month, where the mayor of Udine posed with Luca and the LEGO version of their home town.

25725674464_d5d1d887dd_o

Click to see more photos

LEGO cones make perfect Spanish roof tiles

I’ve been waiting for more people to utilize o0ger‘s roof building technique since it was posted last December. As o0ger showed us then, when you alternate the direction of stringed one-by-one cones they make a pretty snazzy-looking Spanish tile rooftop. At least one other builder has incorporated o0ger’s technique into a build of their own. And now the technique’s inventor himself has decided to show us how it’s done, with this fantastic harbor scene:

The Harbor

While the cone roof is the standout feature of this build, the entire scene is simply terrific! The harbor itself looks sturdy and lived in, with just the perfect amount of clutter and detail. I also love the dangling water plants.

If you want to incorporate new building techniques into your own builds or share some of your techniques with the LEGO community, I recommend checking out the LEGO Techniques Flickr Group for inspiration.

Roof technique

Raise a glass to this LEGO brewery

Rick Bewier has built a fantastic LEGO brewery scene, complete with an old-school dray lorry picking up its next delivery. The truck itself is a nice little model, but what makes the scene for me is the excellent use of color in the building itself, and things like the sliding warehouse doors and the lights.

Brewery_1

I work for a brewery “in real life” and so I appreciated the other touches Patrick has added. The roof is obviously pretty cool, but what I particularly liked was the chimney — a spot-on detail for a compelling recreation of a classic redbrick Victorian-era brewery.

Brewery_3

Das alte Gewächshaus

FiliusRucilo brings us a wonderful glass house, or green house. This lovely little building is chock full of plant life, with keepers caring for the beautiful flowers and catching things outside. I am fond of the colors and the approach to the windows, which give the building a nice “old” feel. The vines up the back are a nice touch.

Das alte Gewächshaus
  

Where ill minifigs go to get better

If you’ve been feeling a little under-the-weather, this hospital room model by BrickBuilder7622 is bound to cheer you up. The bed and the other hospital furniture are all spot-on, and I’m enjoying the little touches like the angled TV mounted on the wall. But the best bit of this creation is that IV drip — a clever combination of bottle and welding equipment pieces which somehow ends up looking perfect.

Hospital Room

This first class lounge is so luxurious, you won’t regret missing your flight

Airport has been one of the coolest subthemes of LEGO Town sets since the 90s. But while planes have become bigger and better, airport buildings have become more crowded and basic. Andrew Tate rectifies the situation with an outstanding luxury lounge right from the 1950s.

First class lounge - Terminal One - Idlebrick Airport

Sharp lines and plain colors are the most memorable features of architecture from that golden age of flight, and Andrew recreates that style perfectly with basic and curved lines. Even the minifigures in this scene fit right in: notice two charming flight attendants in their chic uniforms, taking a break before their next flight.

First class lounge - Terminal One - Idlebrick Airport

It’s a Dutch world after all

The People of Laaf is an exhibit in the Netherlands amusement park Efteling, which is older than Disneyland. It’s a fairytale land of animatronic puppets who have their own language and architectural style, and the whole thing is accessible by a small monorail. Koen‘s giant representation of the park captures the unique turrets and rooflines of the park quite nicely. But what I love about this model are the cobblestone paths and the towering trees. Make sure to click through the photostream for a full tour, including some side-by-side comparisons to the real park.

The People of Laaf

Polk Library of UW Oshkosh in LEGO microscale

Microscale master Paul Wellington recreated the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh’s campus library at the University’s request. Paul used approximately 4800 individual LEGO pieces to achieve a convincing scale replica of the building and surrounding greenery. Some of the excellent microscale techniques on display here include vertical tiles set into the base as columns, and the trees (a similar style to those seen in Rocco Buttliere’s Palace of Westminster).

Polk Library

See more of Paul’s microscale work on his Flickr page.

Cuda Dragster is a slick LEGO car

ER0L has brought us some fantastic vehicles in the past, like a police tumbler and the famous submarine Lotus from The Spy Who Loved Me, but today’s model may be my favourite. It’s a dragster version of the classic Plymouth Barracuda. Althought the real car is known for its curves, this models seems to pull them off with long tiles. It truly is majestic.

Cuda Dragster

Little LEGO flower cart is overflowing with nice touches

de-marco has built a cute little flower cart which wouldn’t look out of place in an official Town set…
flower cart
There’s good use of different varieties of LEGO flower stems and petals here, and the baskets and hanging buckets are nice touches. But it’s the canopy and the handles/stand which are the best bits for me – nice and simple techniques which do a great job in the minimum amount of space. Just goes to show a model doesn’t have to be large to showcase quality building.