Posts by Ryan Wood

Star Wars outpost introduces us to the dregs of the galaxy

Star Wars’ used-universe aesthetic is a trove of inspiration for minifig diorama builders like Aubrey Breelan to mine, skilled world-builders who can populate layouts with all manner of diverse ne’er-do-wells and wannabe heroes. We recently saw Coruscant’s underbelly on Level 1313, and now we’re plunked down onto a bustling street on an unnamed outpost world.

An outpost in a galaxy far far away

Troopers from the Empire and Rebellion are in close proximity with normal folk, and just as Rogue One showed us on the cusp of A New Hope a violent clash feels like it could break out at any moment. Everyone here is sure to have a story, and the builder invites you to take a closer look at the motley array of characters eking out a living.

Outpost Figbarf

Shall we play a game?

Builder Joe is back and this time he’s built a technically and technologically impressive LEGO desktop complete with a window into a virtual world. The entire scene is a practical-built exercise in forced perspective as an off-screen player manipulates characters in the medieval game with her mouse and keyboard setup.

The Quest

There are several instances of nice parts usage in this scene including minifigure legs as keys on the keyboard and balistraria. I’m also quite keen on the warm, swirling sunset built into the background. There’s also an adorable duck with brick separators for a bill.

Microbot squad reports for colorful duty

Only 9 bricks tall but Marco De Bon‘s tiny squad of microbots pack a detailed punch! This colorful trio of bots knows how to make maximum use out of minimal space. Each has a unique assortment of nice LEGO parts usage that exemplifies the saying “good things come in small packages.”

First up is grey microbot mkI using hand armor for its head and a ladder holder for a shield.

Lego "microboT"

Next is the red microbot mkII which has some scuba breathing masks tucked against the chest for some added texture. I guess Marco’s been dipping into their nautical pieces because there are also some frogman’s feet/flippers on either side of the bot’s face and a lifeguard’s rescue float for a codpiece. I love the huge chunky shoulders on this one.

Lego microboT mkII

Lastly, we’ve got blue microbot mkIII, who is a little trickier. The bottom of the head is an upside down Nexo shield which stumped me at first. He also has a really neat use of Hero Factory badge for his chest paneling. It’s also got all sorts of munitions for taking out whatever it is microbots encounter.

Lego microboT mk-III

LEGO Rogue Shadow brings Darth Vader’s enemies to justice

Behold a ship worthy of a Sith apprentice as Kirk Haksever completes his path to the Dark Side with Star Wars: Force Unleashed’s Rogue Shadow. There is much more to discover within the studless LEGO bulkheads of the spacecraft which boasts a fully recreated minifigure-scale interior layout in this masterful build effort.

3 Port1

Explore more of Starkiller’s Rogue Shadow after the break

Want to know how I got these scars?

Gifted LEGO wizard Timofey Tkachev is a master of character work both large and small. If you’re not familiar, we interviewed him a couple years back. Last summer he shared an 80th anniversary Batman bust and now he’s the delivered the Caped Crusader’s most famous archnemesis, Joker. He even left a calling card.

Why So Serious?

It’s an arresting model, clearly modeled after Heath Ledger’s take from 2008’s The Dark Knight complete with smudged makeup and that oh-so-striking smile. This particular wicked grin is made up of crowbars and horns. The shocks of hair are, of course, a bounty of olive-colored limb elements.

Need more of the Clown Prince of Crime in your life? Be sure to check out Vincent’s recent Joker film take and George Paneteleon’s animated series-inspired rendition.

Zip up your fly!

Models don’t get much betta than this. This fintastic creation is by Marcel V who nails the avid fisherman look. Prominently featuring a plaid shirt, with two custom fly lures dangling from the pocket. Sideways treads make a sofishticated zipper. Getting really down into the accurate details, our intrepid fisherman’s chest hair is exposed (horns) and he’s sporting a chain necklace. And what’s a fisherman without a rod? Perfect use of the chakram piece along the length.

Flyfishing

Hello there, General Grievous

TBB newcomer VelociJACKtor has built the dastardly leader of the Separatist’s droid army from Star Wars. I dig the textured dark grey legs and ribs juxtaposed against the smooth tan armor plates. The arms also split as appropriate for the General’s main gimmick. As expected for a model depicting one of the most nefarious — if incompetent — villains in the Star Wars films, General Grievous has several fine lightsabers in his collection from hunting Jedi after being trained by Count Dooku. Maybe the next LEGO Grievous will have a new one.

General Grievous

Not getting enough Grievous in your life? Here’s a model from Marcin Otreba from last summer, or check out the official sets from 2008 and 2015.

The real treasure was the LEGO pieces we collected along the way

Caleb Saw digs deep into LEGO lore with Johnny Thunder’s mansion which is filled with more treasure than you can believe. The complete scene is a roomy, comfortable construction filled with custom warm lighting and a literal treasure trove of LEGO mementos and easter eggs from the old Adventurers line and beyond.

Thunder's Mansion

Click through to see a list of all Johnny Thunder’s treasures. Can you spot them all?

Did someone order a bowl of ramen?

A frequent staple of the Brothers Brick, LEGO Designer Markus Rollbühler knows his way around the LEGO kitchen. He’s dished up a hearty broth containing soft flex hose noodles, minifig leg mushrooms, some yolky eggs, and a white and pink spiraled narutomaki. Gotta say the photography really helps the model shine as well. I’d order this in a restaurant.

101 Bricks: LEGO Ramen

Hungry for more? We’ve got you covered for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Why not have some dessert while you’re at it?

Tiny tank has a leg up on the competition

LEGO Master Tyler Clites, fresh off a nationally televised victory, is already jumping back into battle with a not-so-tiny tank.

Tiny Tank

With deceptively chunky proportions (hearkening back to Metal Slug, Advance Wars, and other video game renditions) this new offering is impressive for it’s economical use of olive green pieces which aren’t available in as wide a variety of molds as many other LEGO colors.

This beauty is also notable for a unique tread technique made by stacking minifig legs. Besides LEGO’s own tread pieces, there have been a bevy of alternate techniques used by builders in the past including binoculars, coupling plates, and even behemoths so big the treads are entirely original builds.

Torpedo Roadster pedals its wares

Idahoan Jake Sadovich, fan designer of the LEGO Ideas Ship in a Bottle, returns to the pages of The Brothers Brick with a retro throwback pedal car.

Before Power Wheels hit the streets, pedal cars ruled. This one heralds from the early 1950s, a pitch-perfect recreation of the Murray Torpedo roadster’s apple red curves.

Murray Torpedo Roadmaster Pedal Car

Click through to see its kinetic function and a 360 view

You came in that thing? You’re braver than I thought

Thomas Jenkins is the latest in a long line of LEGO builders trying their hand at one of -if not THE– most famous ships of all time. While others go for shocking size with accurate interiors, others like Thomas have opted to go pint-sized and adorable.

We’ve seen Han Solo’s pride and joy in this scale before in 2009’s 7778 Midi-scale Millenium Falcon. But in the 11 years since that release building techniques in the world of LEGO aficionados have evolved.

The way Thomas built the forward mandibles, for example, is a departure from every official rendition of the Falcon we’ve seen to date, and in fact many fan creations. The closest I can recall is Gol’s sleek version from late last year which also used slopes to achieve the acute angles. He’s also smartly used a smaller version of the wedge plate flap techniques of it’s larger siblings, and I also genuinely appreciate the effective choice to simply alternate between two different molds of the jumper plates to achieve The Force Awakens-era rectenna.

This isn’t even the first Falcon we’ve featured in a month or even in a week, but you can trust that as long as savvy builders keep coming up with fun and interesting ways to reinterpret the YT-1300 Light Freighter, we’ll share it with you.