Tag Archives: outhouse

A rural office location for a different kind of paperwork

Brick or human, when you need to go, you need to go. We humans have a place to go around every corner (the less hygienic take “every corner” a bit too literally though), but the plastic brick people have a much harder time to find an outhouse. Or at least they would, if SuckMyBrick had not built this outstanding LEGO outhouse.

Outhouse 1

The build is visually simple, well photographed and composed. The ramshackle style is captured perfectly with tiles pointing in angles just odd enough to not be 90 degrees and the front door uses a few closely related colours to give a fading impression – but according to the builder, the creation is not as fragile as it looks. The base completes the build with details like fragrant flowers in the back and curved slopes that really add to the cartoony style.

Got a magazine? This might take a minute.

When men get older, skin becomes a bit thinner and gravity affects and elongates certain features of the body like ears, jowls and…other things. This wreaked havoc in the old days when outhouses were all the rage. A fella would walk out to the pit latrine in the dead of night, have a seat, then promptly get a spider bite right in the dangly bits! Thankfully deadly spider bites have steeply declined in the US since the 1950s, according to records kept by national poison control centers. Changes in how people live have helped as the switch to indoor plumbing sharply decreased black widow bites. (And you were worried I was going to crack a litany of poop jokes with this.) Despite my delivery on the matter, you have to appreciate when someone like Chris Goddard has the gumption to…boldly go where not many LEGO builders have gone before.

MOC: Outhouse

Weathered details abound with the use of reddish brown and the similar-but-not-quite-the-same dark red. Corrugated bricks here and there offer up some texture while round plates denote knotholes or perhaps where termites have chewed through the wood. Traditional folk art such as the animal skull and the crescent moon cutout completes the rustic feel. What’s the story with the moon? Legend has it that it dates back to when the general populace was quite illiterate and the moon shape denoted that ladies were welcome while a sun or star signified a loo for the gentlemen. Having two separate outhouses often proved to be impractical and difficult to maintain, so many properties went with only one and the traditional moon shape remained. And now you are (ahem)…privy to information you may not have had before. Aren’t you glad you dropped by? You ought to celebrate your new-found knowledge by lighting a match before you leave.