About Luka

Luka is a Slovenian LEGO builder and a member of Kocke Klub. He is most well known for building dragons, but does not shy away from other themes when time is right. In the community he goes by Deus "Big D." Otiosus (D. stands for "Destiny") and has been around for quite a few years. He is one of those builders who went through their life without a dark age. Besides LEGO he is a biology student that wastes a lot of time in the local forest or in interesting urban areas. MOC Pages Flickr Bricksafe Youtube

Posts by Luka

Mechanical master of the arena

Gladiators had to face all manners of dangers in the arena, but as Mitsuru Nikaido shows, sometimes the gladiator is scarier than any beast that could be pitted against it, and the builder has made quite a few, many of which featured on the Brothers Brick.

LEGO Robot Mk16-01TT

Nothing says “dangerous” like black and yellow stripes, showing which parts of the mech should be avoided–which here is basically all of them. The builder uses lots of new elements to achieve very flowing shapes of the armour, as well as intensely detailed mechanical parts. The best part use is probably the sword, made out of a helicopter rotor blade.

Imperial AT-ACT walker patrols the tropical paradise of Scarif

A warm, sunny and pleasant tropical paradise was an odd choice to place the plans for the sinister Empire’s Death Star in Rogue One: a Star Wars Story, but this very choice is what made the final act of the film so unique and memorable. While most of the action was focused on small operations and personal stories of the Rebellion, the Empire’s side was all about large plans and large machines, much like this LEGO UCS-scale AT-ACT by yoshix.

AT-ACT UCS

As can be seen by the palm tree and the bunker besides the AT-ACT, the walker is made in minifig scale. This scale is quite rewarding for Star Wars vehicles, either due to many specialized parts designed for them in the nearly two decades of the official LEGO Star Wars line or because some designs from the films simply happen to be blocky. Yoshix’s design mixes studless and studded surfaces to create fine textures and details. My favourite parts are the little splashes of white on the orange section, which give the AT-ACT a great detail of character.

Obey the monolith, slave people of Earth!

From the hands of our otherworldly overlord Rat Dude comes a glorious machine to see our every movement and feel our every emotion, so that we can serve our master with utmost efficiency. Love the Monolith. Trust the monolith. Thought of rebellion is punished by immediate execution.

The builder says that the Monolith’s four mechanical legs each think independently and work together to overcome any terrain and its organic tentacles can feel slaves’ emotions. The sharp angle of the main body reminds its followers of the Monolith’s sharp wit and its white colour of the purity of its purpose–justice. Not only does the glorious Rat Dude bring us a sight of the Monolith, but he even graces us with every aspect of its magnificent construction.

By what do we measure a man if not by his beard?

We recently noted in an article about RADIANT EXERT IV by Eero Okkonen how quickly the builder is producing his human figures, but then he comes back with a double-whammy and shares another one, but with a much longer beard. And beards make everything better. Just to emphasise how fast Eero actually is, you can check some dates of when his latest creations were photographed! And if that wasn’t enough, the builder reveals at the end of his personal blog post that he still has six more figures waiting to be uploaded!

Hans Langseth

But if we focus on his build instead of how Eero is a LEGO building cyborg monster who never sleeps, we can see quite the figure of Hans Langseth, the record-holder for the longest beard in history. The scale really opens up many possibilities for details, like cheek-bones made out of 1×1 round plates and a handlebar moustache made out of… handlebars! The beard is a simple technique of stacking 1×2 plates on one another on one stud only, forming a chain that pivots on these individual connections, forming a rugged and easily formable shape. All this is put into a more real environment with the ornate chair Hans is sitting on.

A beautiful LEGO baroque cathedral emerges out of nowhere

Every now and again, a mysterious builder pops up, presenting amazing creations, often with little to no additional information in tags, groups or descriptions. Italian builder Giacinto Consiglio is one of such examples, as his Flickr photostream is a hidden gem that was just waiting to be discovered. The builder has been around for many months, mostly focusing on modular buildings. His latest creation is a bit of a deviation from that style, but some of Giacinto’s skills from modular buildings have translated into classical architecture very well.

Baroque Cathedral

What will probably be the first thing to impress most people is the grand scale, with its base measuring 96 studs in length and width. It is built in minifig scale, but is not a recreation of any particular cathedral.

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Mew gave birth. We named the new Pokémon Mewtwo

Whether Mewtwo or Lukatwo is a good name for a baby is an open parenting debate, but DanielBrickSon‘s LEGO Mewtwo is a powerful and undebatably expertly built. In public perception, this Pokémon has a strange place. Die-hard fans will love it, but people with passing interest in the franchise may be scratching their heads, as it was difficult to obtain in the games and was a plot device in a few episodes of the anime, as opposed as some better known Pokémon (looking at you, Pikachu!), which were proper characters.

Mewtwo_2

Daniel has captured Mewtwo’s curved shapes perfectly, using constraction armor parts and round system elements. The purple stripe and tail deserve some attention, as the curve on the belly appears to be made out of Bionicle masks. The build is mostly Bionicle and constraction based, but includes just enough System bricks like minifig helmets and horn pieces, to smooth out some rough edges. The builder even added some light-up features to make Mewtwo’s psychic attacks even more intimidating.

Mewtwo_6

Conducting research on modular science

Everybody loves modular buildings! Whether it is original sets or fan creations, modulars just seem to connect with people, Łukasz Libuszewski included, judging by his recent build called Victor’s Lab. The building is made in a Victorian style that fits well with many official LEGO modular sets like the Parisian Restaurant 10243 on the right side and Łukasz’s older original creation on the — Old Town Pub.

Victor's Lab

I love the little “LODDI” logo above the door of a clothes shop and the angled wall in the corner, nicely finished off by slopes around the door. Elegant is the keyword here, with window ornaments and a steeply sloped roof that screams “classy!” If you want to see just how good Łukasz is, check out the concept art (which is beautiful in its own right) after which Victor’s Lab is modeled.

Slowly, magnificently, the ship rose out of the water

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the first in its series to truly delve into darker themes and atmosphere. It seems this mysterious and gloomy tome is what inspired Simon NH to build his latest creation, a microscale scene of the Durmstrang ship’s arrival at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft & Wizardry.

Durmstrang and Hogwarts

It seems Simon has a phobia for normal bricks, as there are hardly any throughout the build. There are a few used as the lake and some plates visible here and there, but everything else is built from “specialized” parts and more or less exotic tiles and slopes. Of course, the inner construction probably has a lot of basic bricks, but here the looks are probably the most important. The best details have to be the tower’s roof and the wings used as waves. It is not all just in the cool parts used and in the combinations of bricks most people would never think to put together; a big impact is made by the lighting, photography and the subtle background added in post-production. I can almost hear the wind howling and waves crashing!

This LEGO model was built as an entry for TBB’s Microscale Magic contest. Coverage on TBB of an entry will not be taken into consideration during judging, and will have no effect on its ability to win, either positively or negatively.

Femme fatale can be interpreted in many ways

We have seen many top-notch character builds from Eero Okkonen over the years, including his recent recreation of the Finnish band Circle, and it seems Eero has nailed the human form in bricks so well that he can pump them out with an (ironically) inhuman speed, with each better than the last!

RADIANT EXERT IV

The builder often takes inspiration from Japanese videogames and cartoons and his latest creation, RADIANT EXERT IV is no different. While there is no specific source material that Eero has tried to recreate, the bulky armour, bunny-ear ribbon in her hair and a miniskirt are unmistakably Japanese. There is a strange yet perfectly balanced mix of bulk and elegance, with eye-catching details like a sword with a laser blade made of Clickits string and wings on her boots.

He is horrible—horrible beyond anything you can imagine—but wonderful

This dark and mysterious figure by Fedde Barendrecht represents a powerful evil from H. P. Lovecraft’s horror stories. While not as well known as Cthulhu, Nyarlathotep is just as terrifying. In the stories and poems he is said to have a thousand forms, and Fedde has decided to build possibly the most sinister of them in LEGO; a tall, slender man with coal black skin and clothing, with tentacles spreading from underneath his robe.

The Black Man

Most of Fedde’s builds are small with a funny theme, generally centered around an imaginative new use for an exotic brick. Every now and again, however, a nightmare-inducing creation like this one pops up. The build itself is simple, or at least it uses very few pieces, apart from the numerous tentacles. My favourite part usage is the octopus used as Nyarlathotep’s mouth and the tentacles behind his head.

The gelatinous wonder from space

We may sound like broken records here at The Brothers Brick every year when SHIPtember rolls around, but I really do believe that spaceships people build are getting more and more imaginative. Inthert‘s contribution to this year’s event is a prime example of that.

Pleurotus Flight - Poster Shot

The spaceship looks almost alive, like a mix between a jellyfish, a mushroom and pure mechanical evil. Shapes are nothing LEGO bricks naturally support, but the builder has managed not only to make the dome at the front look good but also to make it open, with a beautiful mechanical interior. General consensus for conservative spaceship colour schemes suggests fewer colours used, carefully separated by clean lines, but somehow Inthert has managed to make his build look great even with multiple grays, black, brown, gold and green used in very intense combinations. The secret here is that each colour has a strongly defined role and makes sense in the build. As far as details go I could not even begin to cover all the ingenious little parts, but my favourite by far is the central section, where mechanical tentacles can be seen through transparent panels.

Pleurotus Flight - Open Dome

The two staves — awesome life-size LEGO prop replicas from The Lord of the Rings

Staves may be little more than glorified sticks, but they have managed to work their way into the very heart of fantasy symbols. Some of the most famous examples are found in The Lord of the Rings, wielded by some of literature’s most famous wizards. Jon & Catherine Stead have recreated in 1:1 scale a pair of the wizard staves seen in The Lord of the Rings films.

The staff of Saruman the White is a remarkably clean model built around the Star Wars planet elements for the orb. Unless you zoom in, it might be hard to recognize the staff is actually LEGO. This is even more impressive if its mere five hours of build time are taken into account. The builders also share the exact piece count, which is 831 for this particular model, and it measures 91 inches in length.

Saruman's Staff - 1

The staff of Gandalf the Grey is an impressive creation in a completely different way. It is not quite as accurate to its movie representation as Saruman’s staff, but the complexity of the source material makes its recreation a much more impressive achievement. The spiraled headpiece is created using multiple arch elements wrapping around the shaft. The build was completed in an impressive four hours using 938 bricks. It measures 61 inches in length.

Gandalf's Staff - 1