About Luka

Luka is a Slovenian LEGO builder and a member of Kocke Klub. He is most well known for building dragons, but does not shy away from other themes when time is right. In the community he goes by Deus "Big D." Otiosus (D. stands for "Destiny") and has been around for quite a few years. He is one of those builders who went through their life without a dark age. Besides LEGO he is a biology student that wastes a lot of time in the local forest or in interesting urban areas. MOC Pages Flickr Bricksafe Youtube

Posts by Luka

Living metal encasing dying flesh

Nobody likes to die horribly at the hand of a horrifying flesh and machine amalgam, such as this Remade inspired by the criminals and other undesirables sentenced to such an existence in British author China Miéville’s Perdido Street Station. This LEGO version by AdNorrel invokes a strange kind of morbid curiosity that just will not let you look away — as long as the incomprehensible thing is not coming at us…

The Remade

There is a lot to love (or fear?) about this creation. The organic parts are very well done, using minifig arms and sausages and even a dark red scarf to create flowing rounded shapes, highlighted by blue rubber bands representing veins. If you look closely at the head, you might recognize a tiny bit of a shrub piece peeking out of a red flower element, making for a good structural part in a build with this many crazy angles. With the mechanical parts, the Remade combines gore and the fear of technology into something nobody wants to see, yet one that we’re unable to stop staring at.

Time is money, friend! This LEGO Goblin Shredder from World of Warcraft won’t back down

World of Warcraft is still a remarkably popular game considering its age, and it’s no surprise that the millions of players worldwide overlap with the millions of LEGO fans somehow. A case of this combination is Chris Perron with his Goblin Shredder.

The mech piloted by a crazy little green guy seems ready to fell some sacred trees, and it is equipped for the job. The circular sawblade is very well incorporated into the arm and the little chains in the elbow joints give a convincing impression of a fantasy machine. I love the dark red lines at the ankles, but by far the best part is the “face” of the mecha, sculpted with all sorts of polygonal pieces. Its mouth, which uses a cowcatcher piece in front of various translucent orange pieces, even lights up!

The slimiest rat on the ship

Slimefoot the Stowaway is a Magic: the Gathering character that is most definetely not a rat, but his presence on an airship must have been much like a cross between a fungal rot and a rat problem with all the little saprolings he spread aboard the Weatherlight. Not sure what a saproling is? Me neither, and to be honest, nobody really knows anything apart from the fact that they are either of plantal or fungal origin and that there is a lot of them. Eero Okkonen has faithfully created Slimefoot and his pals.

Slimefoot, the Stoaway

With a mastery in human shape, Eero has done a great job of capturing what is basically a deformed humanoid with a mushroom top for a head and overgrowth all over his body. The colours are expressive, and the tentacles, while not present on the original art on the card, add a lot to the character and make for a great transition in the neck area. A great addition is all the little saprolings at the mushroom man’s side, whose various shapes really capture the mystical and magical appeal of the original art.

Enter the fanciest crossroad in the kingdom

Magical swirls, bright colours, and mysterious runes might impress you in this portal hub scene by LEGO builder Chris Perron, but with a bit of thought you realize it is just a glorified crossroad, which seems as magical to us as cars would to someone using a portal transport system.

Portal Wizard

There is so much to love in the scene. The swirling, colourful portals are highlighted in post-production to give an immersive magical feeling. The green runes on the floor add a bit of mystery, along with the eye symbols and other decoration on the walls. The real star is the forced perspective castle in the central, blue portal and how it is lit in beautiful sunset colours.

Arise, arise, Riders of Théoden!

LEGO castle scenes are generally static pieces of landscape with some kinds of structures or a little sprinkle of life in the form of a handful of minifigs. This is a tested formula that works best in most examples, but the latest scene by h2brick is not one of them. The builder faithfully recreates a piece of the battle of Minas Tirith from the third Lord of the Rings movie.

Ride of the Rohirrim MOC

The landscaping is nice to look at with flowing layers and colours, as well as some well built yet subtle rocks. One would expect the LEGO horse to start feeling repetitive, but the variation between colours, mold types and posing keeps it fresh. The touches of clutter on both sides give a feeling of an anxious anticipation of battle.

Take a luxury cruise straight into the enemy fleet

The latest creation from Quy Chau is an intense and visceral spaceship with an interesting backstory of a luxury cruiser redesigned into a military spaceship. While I do appreciate the imagination, this begs the question of why anyone would perform such a refit.

Archangel

There are so many insane angles on this vertical spaceship, achieved with slopes and wedge slopes oriented in all sorts of ways. The builder leaves many technic elements exposed, which feels very realistic and dirty, without a trace of a luxury cruiser design mentioned in the builder’s description. The vertical shape and cylindrical parts pointing in all directions are an especially welcome breath of fresh air in a world (in a universe?) full of needlesly aerodynamic spacecraft.

When our inner schism stops destroying and starts creating

By now, LEGO bricks’ place among other art media should be obvious, but it still seems to be more of an exception than the rule for builders to express their emotions through bricks. But some times, builders do feel the need to express themselves, as in the case of Malin Kylinger in her latest build. Malin states that the dual theme of the creation represents a range of emotions she went through in the recent times. What at first glance looks like a simple struggle between good and evil hides countless possible interpretation. Is this a chaotic whirlwind of changing emotion or is it a fine balance? Or maybe there is no struggle, just coexistence of light and dark?

Worlds inside of me

Whatever the interpretation, there is no getting around the fact this is a great build. The face is technically a somewhat flat build, but from the photos, it looks very realistic. The hair is built using an interesting technique using strings with bars as the flexible basis for the white and dark red leaves. My favourite part by far are the eyes built using pieces as crazy as feathered minifig wings. The landscaping might look chaotic to some, but I see it as a stream of consciousness in LEGO.

Transparency in business

Builders tackle the LEGO Castle so often, I sometimes wonder if it has been completely exhausted. At times like that, builders such as Jonas Wide prove me wrong. When people move away from the military aspect of castle, they can find an endless well of inspiration beyond just castles and battles.

Glass Works in Barqa

This glass-blowing workshop scene is as much artful photography as it is a LEGO build. The lighting through the windows and from the kiln is quite immersive, and the build itself is not bad at all. The textures on the walls are just enough and the tiles on the floor use related colours that actually look like variable clay bricks. What I really love is the attention to detail with the minifigs – a little drop of sweat on a minifig’s face is enough to show just how hot the workshop must be.

Home grown, healthy and fresh

If you haven’t had your daily dose of vitamins yet, this creation by alego alego might satisfy your needs — provided you can digest ABS plastic, of course. There is anything you could wish for in this fruit and vegetable stand, from peppers to onions, eggplants and lettuce.

BPChallenge

What is a street stand without a street? The background scene is detailed and realistic, with ingot tiles as bricks on the house and a kitty looking out the window. The hydrant and candelabra help the sidewalk avoid being plain or empty. Obviously the vegetable stand is the best part, with all sorts of unique parts uses, like joker’s hair as lettuce and frogs as peppers. Minifig arms are used all around as various fruits and vegetables in different colours – eggplants, chili peppers, bananas…

We are the forsaken!

A few months ago, russian builder Timofey Tkachev has uploaded a photo of his latest build in progress on his Flickr photostream. In said photo, the two versions of the same face threw me off from what I should immediately have guessed to be the beginning of the bust of Warcraft’s Sylvannas Windrunner, the banshee queen.

Sylvanas Windrunner (instruction available)

The facial features are captured perfectly, displaying a beautiful woman turned into a monster. Her characteristic features like the slender pointy ears, elongated eyebrows and a heavy eyeliner smeared by tears are immediately recognizable, but it is the more general details of a humanoid face that are really amazing. The lips are very realistic, using a double feather piece on each side and the nose is not only realistic, but looks like something a model would spend a lot of money on at a plastic surgeon. Timofey adds a few extra pieces of information in the photo description: the build consists of 855 pieces, measures 24 cm in height and her eyes light up!

Tax collection by the river bank

If there is a place where even medieval tax collection would look picturesque, it would be Arylego‘s latest scene, depicting a wooden water mill. This unpleasant task is quite often depicted escalating into violence, so Arylego’s creation comes as a breath of fresh air, showing a civil conversation.

Ambarvale Mill

The colour scheme is muted, but quite realistic, with a tree in autumn red colours as a contrast to lighten up the scene. My favourite parts have to be the textures and mixing of colours on the roof and timber walls of the building. Welcome uses of parts are the hinge plates with fingers used in the wheel, which makes the shape much more flowing than any other hinge system.

Wisdom as your sword, knowledge as your shield

In a world where castle means intense textures and exotic part uses, Henjin Quilones brings a breath of fresh air with an all-LEGO library scene.

The Library of Druidham

While there are a few unique techniques like the huge armchairs and nice angles on the roof’s underside, the real quality of the creation is its atmosphere. The composition and posing of the minifigs really set up a great mood. The best part has to be the lighting, with warm sunlight shining through the windows and a lit fireplace. This is one of those cases when a creation is as much a build as an artistic photograph.