Tag Archives: Ship

Out on patrol

The stripped-back colour scheme used in this model could easily have seen it turn out as a big lump of grey bricks — a common problem in LEGO creations depicting modern maritime vessels. However, this offshore patrol ship by Luis Peña has a really pleasing level of detail. The depth of texture around the bridge is excellent, and the microfigures on the forward deck create a sense of the appropriate scale in which to consider the model. The isolated splashes of colour offered by the helicopter and the flags manage to break things up a bit, and the use of Technic bricks for portholes down the hull may be obvious, but it’s also effective.
Offshore Patrol Vessel "Piloto Pardo" 1:200 scale LEGO model Patrullero de Zona Marítima "Piloto Pardo" Modelo LEGO escala 1:200
It’s a cool model, however the white backdrop for the photography is a little stark. Might have been nice to set the scene with a “sea” of loose trans blue 1×1 plates or something?

Ta Davy Jones’ locker with ya!

There is no doubt that William Navarre is one of the best and most active LEGO builders out there, churning out build after build of great quality almost every week. This one and his previous creation were built for the Colossal Battle Contest.

Down to Davy Jones

This naval battle has a lot going for it; the positioning of the ships is very expressive and dynamic, not to mention how well they are constructed. The scale is deceiving and the details are amazing — from the burning elements of the sinking ship to the rigging on the victorious side, each vessel is worth looking at individually. What I like best though, is the surrounding water, achieving a realistic look with two layers, a top textured one, and the bottom for colour (and a great look from the side!). William’s creations seem to have a theme of their simpler environment ending up capturing my attention even longer than the build’s focal point…

Ship In A Bottle: The Flagship Leviathan and Voltron – Defender of the Universe are the two next LEGO Ideas sets [News]

LEGO has announced today that Ship In A Bottle: The Flagship Leviathan by Jacob Sadovich will be the next set in the Ideas line. This project was selected from a group of 12 ideas that had gathered 10,000 supporters by January 9, 2017. The project was originally submitted to the LEGO Ideas platform in November 2016, so it took the ship only 48 days to gather fans’ support. Pricing and availability for this set are yet to be announced. The LEGO Ideas Blog interviewed Jacob back in May 2017, where he talked about the challenges he faced creating the model.

The Flagship Leviathan

And after being held over from a previous review stage, the Voltron – Defenders of the Universe project was also approved to become an Ideas set. You can find the interview with the author of that project, Leandro Tayag, on the LEGO Ideas Blog tool. As usual, pricing and availability will be the subject of a future announcement.

Voltron

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The LEGO Ninjago Movie’s 70618 Destiny’s Bounty [Review]

Initially designed with the help of a focus group of adult LEGO builders, Ninjago has been one of LEGO’s most popular themes since its inception in 2011. Rumors of its impending cancellation circulated a few years ago, but the theme has stayed strong and become one of the longest-lived homebrew licenses for LEGO. Now having spawned a feature film due for release September 22, the line is as robust as ever with more than a dozen sets and a minifigure series from the film in the latest wave. This year’s lineup contains the several of the largest Ninjago sets ever, such as 70617 Temple of the Ultimate Ultimate Weapon, which we reviewed yesterday. Today’s focus is 70618 Destiny’s Bounty, which at 2,295 pieces edges out 2015’s Temple of Airjitzu (2,028 pieces) and loses only to the as-yet-unreleased Ninjago City (a whopping 4,867 pieces) to come in as the second largest Ninjago set ever. 70618 Destiny’s Bounty retails for $159.99 and is available now from the LEGO Shop Online.

70618 Destiny's Bounty

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125,000 piece scale model of the RMS Titanic

On the fateful night of April 14th, 1912, the RMS Titanic steamed into an iceberg in the North Atlantic, resulting in one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history. Discovered on the ocean floor by Dr. Robert Ballard, immortalized by James Cameron in the 1997 film of the same name, the historic ship has now been created using about 125,000 LEGO pieces by Ben Macleod. I have seen a couple of LEGO versions of the Titanic, But Ben’s is the first I have seen with a full interior of every deck. 

Taking approximately 2,000 hours over 3 years, the dimensions of this thing are amazing, at a length of 9 feet 7 inches (2.9 meters or 364 studs) a width of 1 foot 8 inches (0.5 meters or 62 studs) and a height of 2 feet 8 inches (0.8 meters or 84 studs).  It is currently on display at “Wax World of the Stars” in Cavendish, Canada.

We don’t need a bigger boat

Although a bigger boat is sometimes a necessity, shrinking your favourite LEGO ships into more manageable proportions can be useful. Brick LeKao might have run out of display space, or perhaps he’s just a fan of more petite sets judging by his collection of cute Pirates of the Caribbean microscale ships. Silent Mary, the Black Pearl, and Queen Ann’s Revenge are all built in microscale, but despite their small size, they are completely recognisable as the famous vessels.

MINI Queen Anne's Revenge

Click to see more adorably miniaturized pirate ships

Green and white to sail the ocean blue

What I love most about this gallant old tall ship by Sebeus I is that it’s still distinctly in the style of the classic LEGO Pirate ships I remember from the early 90s. Of course, this one is both much larger and much better detailed, but it still incorporates the large hull elements and distinctive flags along the sides for cannon ports. The custom paper sails add a great look, too.

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Where this ship really shines, though, is in the stern, which is low and sleek and expertly sculpted. The ship manages to capture the deck’s curvature in a way the old sets never could. It looks just perfect to fetch some breadfruit plantings from the tropics.

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I am a leaf on the wind – watch how I soar

Shown at Bricks Cascade 2017 and winner of Interstellar Bella trophy, Jonathan Walker‘s breathtaking Shadowcaster is a masterpiece. At 133ish studs in length, the leaf-like beauty is massive. Inspired by a train station in France by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, Jonathan spent a lot of time building curves, stressing LEGO in ways it shouldn’t be stressed; the results are extraordinary. Each 4 stud section is attached by a single stud to the spine and they are all held in place by the curve of sand green on the edges. I love the colors he has used and the multi-directional engines mounted underneath. A spectacular spaceship to demonstrate the limitless potential of our beloved plastic brick.

Shadowcaster

Mesmerizing kinetic LEGO model of the RMS Titanic

Korean builder Bangoo H has created a nifty little display model of the world’s most famous passenger liner. The repeated pattern of blue and white slopes for the waves is a lovely representation.

LEGO MOC Titanic Automaton

But you must check out the video below to get the full effect. The mechanism of the rolling waves is truely hypnotic and far more peaceful than what passengers would have really experienced on that fateful North Atlantic voyage.

Dreadnought delivers the whale mail

A cute pocket battleship combines forces with a whale, apparently to deliver the mail, in this LEGO creation from Revan New. I genuinely have no idea what is going on here, but I like it. First up, we see the chibi-styled dieselpunk dreadnought sailing into a moody sunset, a companionable whale matching the ship’s course…

Drεαdnϙught

And then the true nature of this partnership is revealed — some sort of oceanic postal service…

"I'll send you a message with the white post whale"

The styling of the little dreadnought is smart — I particularly like the curve of the hull and the maroon striping. Those deck guns are pretty good too. And then the whale itself has a friendly face. Who wouldn’t want this guy turning up at the door with their Amazon packages?

All-in-all, this is nicely built, nicely photographed, and nicely crazy. Just the sort of stuff we like round here.

Final voyage of the Lemuria

There’s something calming, peaceful, and haunting about a shipwreck. It’s knowing that it’s untouchable at the deepest depths of the ocean, where no one can touch the remains of the ship. Built by TBB contributor Luka Vodnik, this is a sombre ship, mesmerizing us with contrasting details and a story we may never know. Smooth tiles form the body of the ship’s hull, with studded elements creating barnacles. Luka has named the ill-fated vessel Lemuria, leaving her tales with Davy Jones at the bottom of the sea.

Lemuria

LEGO Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales 71042 Silent Mary [Exclusive Review]

Last month, we went to New York Toy fair to bring you the first images of 71042 Silent Mary when LEGO unveiled their latest Pirates of the Caribbean tie-in set, 71042 Silent Mary, and now we’re pleased to bring you this exclusive early review of the set.  Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales is the fifth installment in the Pirates of the Caribbean film series and is due for release on 26 May, 2017. Although the official trailer for the movie features the Silent Mary, Armando Salazar’s ghost ship, there may be some very minor spoilers below.

TBB_POTC_71042_Completed_Set-Edit

LEGO 71042 Silent Mary has 2,294 parts and  is due for release to LEGO VIP members on 17 March, 2017 priced at $199.99/£179.99/199,99 € and is listed for ages 14+. The Silent Mary isn’t quite the largest ship LEGO has made, though she does impressively measure over 18” (48cm) high with the main mast in vertical position, and 26” (68cm) long and 8” (22cm) wide. She’s just over 14” (36cm) wide with the main mast collapsed. To give you a comparison, a largest LEGO ship is 10210 Imperial Flagship, which measures 29.5” (75 cm) long and 23.6” (60 cm) tall. 4184 The Black Pearl is a bit smaller, coming in at 21” (53cm) long, 20” (50cm) tall and 5” (12cm) wide.

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