Tag Archives: W. Navarre

The legendary duel between bright Fingolfin and dread Morgoth

Long before Sauron plagued Middle Earth, there was the evil Morgoth. W. Navarre presents us with the Dark Lord’s duel with the shining Elven king Fingolfin in a lovely LEGO scene. Fingolfin stands before Morgoth, his blade gleaming in the darkness surrounding them in Angband, the Dark Lord’s stronghold. Morgoth prepares the first strike, commencing the legendary duel that will ultimately claim the Elven king. The figures possess a beautiful craft speaking of a great love for J.R.R Tolkien’s legendarium. Fingolfin’s figure is splendid indeed, but Morgoth’s is where my eye is drawn. There’s an amazing amount of greebles adorning the Dark Lord, and some amazing parts making up his armor. One such piece is the drill bit in the center of his face, a piece that’s more versatile than I expected at my first encounter with it.

And Morgoth Came

Smaug brings fire and ruin to Lake-town

From The Hobbit: Desolation of Smaug comes a scene of fiery wrath by W. Navarre. This build exists for the Middle-earth LEGO Olympics, bringing an iconic scene from the movie to life. Bard the Bowman pauses a moment as his home is set ablaze by the vengeful dragon Smaug, his determination to save his family and fellow townsfolk set by the heat. The fire illuminates some wonderfully crafted LEGO building and buildings. The homes have great details and features, though those sconces are no longer necessary with Smaug’s flames lighting the place. Some of the roofs have printed tiles, but others have the textures of Technic tread pieces. Of course, the town isn’t the only cool thing in the scene–the ice floating in the water is pretty neat too. The ice is brick-built sideways with slopes and wedges to give it those angles and edges. Though, I think most of it will melt until Smaug stops throwing fire around everywhere.

The Desolation of Lake-town

You’ll have a hauntingly good time aboard the Flying Dutchman

The Flying Dutchman has been haunting the minds of those who enjoy a good maritime legend for centuries. The ghost ship no doubt haunts W. Navarre‘s mind, inspiring this cool LEGO creation. This build is for the Iron Builder challenge, specifically the use of giant green minifig hands. The use of them here is subtle and cool. Can you spot them? They’re the cannons! Their bright green color is perfect for a ghostly vessel doomed to roam the seas for all time. Speaking of subtleties, I really like the hints at otherworldliness on the ship. Those details don’t overwhelm the structure of the ship itself, allowing it to pass as an old sailing vessel–until you’re up close and personal. The ghostly touch I like the most is the curved flame piece at the top of the central mast. It’s the perfect part for that tattered, ethereal flag look.

Ghost Ship: The Flying Dutchman

Continue on, if ye be brave enough

Ancient Egyptian amphibian with hands for feet

Builder W Navarre has taken inspiration from the latest LEGO Architecture set and travelled to Egypt for his latest Iron Builder salvo. The centrepiece is a rather jolly-looking frog, cleverly using the bright green hand piece for the eye stalks. It also sees apples repurposed as big toes on the front legs. This little amphibian does go some way to deceive regarding the scale of the build though! The rest of the build gives slightly more clues, and is worth investigating in its own right as there are some great techniques on display. Much of the background is brick-built in microscale and blurred to add some forced perspective, even the water of the river Nile below. The best bit might just be the hieroglyphs on the frog’s plinth though! A mish-mash of parts, together with some gaps naturally created by the geometry of LEGO pieces, gives them a terrifically authentic weathered feel. Another of the seed part hands even makes an appearance, although it is well hidden – can you spot it?

Premonition: Nile Frogs

You’ll fall for this Assassin’s Creed LEGO scene

In his latest LEGO build, W. Navarre posits an Assassin’s Creed video game set in Spain circa 1398. Our roguish hero is taking his hallmark “leap of faith” down to the streets below. But, while the assassin minifigure is clearly the focus of this build, I can’t help but admire the excellent buildings making up this Spanish city. There’s some excellent stonework displayed on the balconies, and of course the iconic terra cotta rooftops of Spain. And, while the vast majority of the build is sepia-toned, I love the pockets of bright color dappled throughout. A hint of light bright yellow on the side of a building, a splotch of turquoise visible through a window, and the occasional dark red roof tile all stand out, even in the fuzzy background.

Assassin's Creed: Spain 1398

Click here to watch the video!

The black knight always triumphs!

“‘Tis but a scratch!” If I didn’t know any better, I would’ve thought W. Navarre built a large scale figure of that black knight. Yet, this formidable figure inspired by Dark Souls has no dismembered appendages at all and is actually threatening. While Navarre hasn’t shown the full figure yet, we see just enough. Leaning on his sword after a day of battle, the knight’s weary position conveys so much character. Navarre’s detailed build is not too cluttered, and we can easily tell what is what, and it works so well.

The Black Knight

“Alright, we’ll call it a draw.” Check out more amazing builds by W. Navarre here!

A mysterious warrior takes a moment to reflect

This mystical scene comes from the creative mind of W. Navarre. In the build, we see the silhouette of a figure perched on a rooftop, with the roof tiles cleverly portrayed through the use of ball joint plates. The warrior is overshadowed by a bright moon, which has a great variation of textured pieces representing the rocky surface. Waves crash against the house surrounded by a bamboo forest, featuring the use of tan Technic pins as bamboo stalks. The odd angle of the house mixed with the mystical aesthetic makes this one unique display.

Moon Blade!

What do you get when you cross an elephant and a fountain?

Sometimes you just want to have fun, like LEGO builder W. Navarre clearly did when building this amusing vignetter of a hunter getting his comeuppance from a delightfully chibi elephant. The scene playing out here is great, but I’m mostly enthralled by the excellent elephant, who is completely adorable right down to the toenails. I’m also loving how good those grey Mixels eye tiles work turned sideways.

The Risks of Elephant Hunting

TBB Cover Photo for September 2021: A sense of peace and tranquillity

There is something special about a scene that not only tells a story but triggers your imagination to see the entire world beyond what you are looking at. Heavily understated and humbly set, this scene is masterfully staged by builder W. Navarre.

Asia

Once your mind recalls that you are looking at a LEGO creation, you will feel the need to explore further and look deeper. This is when you will notice the technicality that is cloaked by the emotional connection to the scene. The bridge that draws your focus is indeed one amazing build on its own. With parts facing in just about every angle on the protractor and the clever placement of the slopes aids the design, ensuring a great visual aesthetic to the bridge. The technical candy does not stop there! For those hungry for more, your eyes soon move beyond the bridge and over the fields… then onto the mountain range in the background. It is here that you see more creative usage of curved slope pieces to help form the chiselled yet visually pleasing features of the distant mountains. The colour choices only build this further creating a clever and realistic sense of depth.

You can see the original TBB article on this build here

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Conquistadors clash with Aztecs in a night of fear and greed

Sometimes, imagined history can be as colorful as the real thing (which I typically find more surprising than fiction). Talented historical builder Josiah Durand is no stranger to the Aztec and early colonial period of history — we’ve featured his ruined pyramid of Tenochtitlan and Mesoamerican ballgame scenes previously. But in his latest scene inspired by Pre-Columbian civilizations, Josiah imagines what might have happened if a smaller group of Spanish Conquistadors had attempted to wrest riches from the Aztecs decades before Columbus sailed the ocean blue. Things do not appear to be going well for the Spaniards…

La Noche Triste

Josiah incorporates elements from the Aztec Warrior minifig in the Series 21 Collectible Minifigures, mixing the pieces so each warrior is unique. Behind the minifigs, microscale palaces and temples provide a forced-perspective background, with a mountain range behind them. Beneath, transparent bricks arranged on their sides serve as a highly textured water surface. But my favorite detail is the pair of Aztec statues on the lift side of the scene, with distinct noses and feathered crowns. Titled “La Noche Triste” (“the sad night”), I’m personally rooting for the indigenous Aztecs, and won’t be especially sad if the invading Conquistadors meet a sticky end atop those distant pyramids.

Peace and tranquility and some forced perspective

When I stumbled upon this creation by W.Navarre I had to look twice to confirm it is made out of LEGO. I recognize the minifigure and the cow as LEGO parts but the total shot looks like it’s straight from National Geographic. W.Navarre created mountains as a backdrop. For the mountains, they used different shades of blue which creates the forced perspective in this picture. The dark blue mountains represent the nearest mountains. The further away the mountains are, the lighter the shade of blue of the mountains appear to be. Just like in real life. Using a mirror as a surface to place the build on creates a reflection of the mountains and mimics water perfectly. The total shot of this creation is so realistic it is absolutely stunning! My guess is there are a lot of parts not connected in this build and that gravity plays a huge part in keeping this together which is perfectly fine!

Asia

A medieval winter wonder-castle

Winter wonderlands are a fairly common theme with LEGO builders, and not just houses and villages, but castles as well, like this cozy castle by W. Navarre. I hope they have plenty of tiny logs to burn in their tiny fireplaces. The model features a nice mix of newer and older gray parts for the perfect weathered look and speaking of weather, the scene includes several patches of snow on the roofs and the surrounding grounds. One of my favorite details is the little tower near the left side, which is attached using 1×1 rounded tiles on their side, stuck into the underside of the larger 2×2 rounded plate.

Iære Castle