Tag Archives: Horror

It takes guts to build something like this

I have resorted to cheap puns to grab your attention with that title but now that you’re here, you’ve got to admit this is pretty cool. You’re looking at (or looking through) a new LEGO creation by Tino Poutianen called Glass Cerberus. The traditional guardian to the gates of hell is fearsome enough as a three-headed dog but the mythical creature has now seeped into nightmare territory. We’ve seen a lot of gutsy creations lately, what with it being close to Halloween and all. Now if only I could gain this hound’s favor perhaps we can find a favorable end to this post. Who’s a good boy? Who’s a good widdle boy? Just kidding! It all ends in unspeakable horror.

Glass Cerberus

A very heart-y tree

Spooky builds don’t have to be all black to get their point across. Anthony Wilson has created a LEGO-based human-tree hybrid called the Aortis Bloom that instead leans into the crimson side of the spectrum. The medically-inclined among us might not even find it creepy – the heart is just a biological necessity, after all. The twisting veins and arteries made from dinosaur tail elements may be a little disquieting, but they’re also very vital to good health. And the blood-red and dark-blue leaves suggest the flowing of oxygen through the system. I’m not sure what those little bits of “fruit” are supposed to represent, though. And just what is the tree sitting in? Dirt? Dried blood? And while really elegant looking, I think that table is actually evil, too. (Just trust me on that.)

Aortis Bloom

If you’d like your October to be a bit more direct with the disquieting images, just take a scroll through our horror archives.

The cards you were dealt

A jack and an ace. In blackjack, this is a winning hand. In the hands of Ivan Martynov? They’re something a bit more scary. The Jack of Clubs, here, is full of twisty organic shapes that lure the eye towards the center of this digitally-created image. There you find that the red highlights are actually a demonic figure (Jack, I presume) entwined into the larger club shape. Is Jack on some sort of throne? Are those wings? Is this a torture rack? Ivan doesn’t give us any firm answers. I have a feeling we wouldn’t like them anyway.

Jack of Clubs

But that’s not the only card in this deck. You also get get the Ace of Diamonds. I’m even less sure what’s going on here. But suddenly I’m very glad that some of these parts don’t exist in our reality. Yet.

Ace of Diamonds

Ivan excels at creating nightmares out of digital LEGO. Don’t believe me? Go look at our archives.

 

Here’s looking at you, kid

This creepy build by Bart De Dobbelaer combines great LEGO part usage with eldritch horror. Or maybe this creature from beyond just wants to borrow a cup of flour. Who are we to judge by appearances? I mean, sure, the mouth full of tentacles ringed by dozens of teeth does seem a bit aggressive. But the multiple claws forming a spiky head of hair might just be a fashion statement. You know, like those DOTs bracelets that ring those not-at-all-evil eyes. The outer frame is pure evil, though. The gold accents may be shiny, but the expert use of brown organic curves of different thicknesses is unsettling in the extreme.

The abyss

Bart excels at finding just the right balance between craftsmanship and horror. Take a minute to check out some of the other creations that we’ve featured.

Come to the dark side. We have cookies. And octopi.

Upon reflection, this warm and cozy den build by Krzysztof may not be as warm and cozy as you first thought. But take a moment to appreciate the great details in this LEGO scene before you get worried. I like the use of crates to give the table legs a bit of texture, and this is the first time I’ve seen a Chima mask used as part of a bear-skin rug. I also like the small details like the blue 1×1 tiles for chalk on the pool table. And the mirror is pretty swanky, too.

On the other side

However, through that looking glass, another pair of eyes looks back, and they’re nowhere near as friendly.
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Dr. Phibes has great vibes

Tons of horror movies are hitting the box office these days, but if you’re ever looking to opt for a classic, it’s worth taking a look at The Abominable Dr. Phibes. This 1971 British dark comedy horror film is the subject of Mark Hodgson‘s latest LEGO build. Set in 1920s London, the film’s set design features some gorgeous examples of Art Deco throughout, most notably the grand ballroom of Dr. Phibes’ mansion which has been recreated here. The campy color scheme is well-replicated in Mark’s build. The bubblegum pink, olive green, and purples are spot-on to the original colors of the set design. And as we ascend the staircase, the mechanical masked musicians fill the air with ominous jazz and Dr. Phibes serenades us at the organ. Just like the opening scene of the film, everything in this build screams DRAMA!

Dr Phibes MOC Lego

Translucent pink 1x2x5 bricks in a cascading formation surround the organ and the lights beneath add an enchanting neon glow to the scene. The translucent black curved windows add a dark overcast feel in the background. Two dead trees and stuffed owls perch on each side of the center stage, fitting the macabre theme. The arch bricks and macaroni tiles throughout the build make this a solid Art Deco build and captures the likeness of Dr. Phibes’ ballroom.

Dr Phibes Lego MOC

In the mood for some more spooky builds? Check out our archives for some more horror-themed creations!

Worm-ridden figure is a creepy delight

LEGO isn’t all cheery minifigures and bright colors, sometimes builders conjure up imagery guaranteed to haunt your nightmares. VB‘s latest — The Red Death — is one such creation: a lurking horror surely deserving of its own chapter in the Cthulhu mythos. The overall frame is a wonderfully creepy form, the shape immediately evoking a hooded figure, with skeletal claws offering a deadly embrace. But then the eye is pulled in, we are powerless to resist, and we become aware of the egg clusters and the black tentacle form nestling within the red worms. The puckered purple mouths at the end of the red tubes provide a final, disgusting, glorious highlight to this sinister figure.

Red Death

I want to play a game

Only one thing pops in my mind with a scene like this, a creepy scene that Jigsaw would put one of his victims in. This one looks a little harmless compared to the more complex contraptions that we’ve seen in the sequels, but a reminder of the classic cult film Saw, that took the world by surprise with a tiny budget and making big headways. This scene by Douglas Hughes, pictures a classic man-tied-to-the-chair movie trope, but what makes it stand out as a LEGO build are the details. They say the details bring a scene to life. The closed-circuit camera, the air vent, that electrical outlet plug outlet, and the old school looking heater all lend the weight to the sense of reality. What’s the story here? Well, for me, reality kicks in for Saw movie is when the director yells “CUT!” and everyone gets a break and grabs a sandwich and coffee, and that’s my secret on how I get through watching a horror flick.

The Interrogation

Frightful floaters are fluent in fear

When it comes to things that inspire nightmares, balloons don’t usually make the list, unless there’s a murderous clown attached to them. This wonderfully crafted balloon cart by #1 Nomad may not have the scariest balloons you ever saw, but they are definitely one of the most unusual.

Balloon Cart

The inside-out tires make amazing eyes. And those teeth! I love the random yellow fangs mixed in. Oh, and let’s not forget to mention… is that a person in that cage? Maybe I need to reevaluate this scary balloon list. At least the builder didn’t include the balloon vendor.

He knows when you’ve been naughty...

Santa Claus rewards good behavior with gifts, but what about the children who have been a bit naughty this year? Forget the lumps of coal in your stocking; you might just receive a visit from the half goat, half demon named Krampus. Sounds like a pleasant experience, right? Letranger Absurde has drawn upon holiday horrors to a LEGO version of the character from the campy 2015 film, Krampus. While Krampus is decked out in a festive “jolly red suit,” the rest of him is pure nightmare fuel. Krampus sits hunched over with lengthy horns protruding, all while his face is creepily hidden behind the veil of the robe. Think about how you treat people this year, or you might find yourself trapped in an eternal snow globe of terror.

Krampus (2015)

Build your own baby

I love a bit of creepy LEGO, and this scene by Leonid An is probably as unsettling as they come. The Scala baby figure is a perfect foil for this grim tale of genetic experimentation. Lit from below in its artificial birthing pod, the infant’s eyes are covered, as it is slowly infused with whatever vile substance lingers in the second dome. The control panel has a retro-futuristic feel, with its rainbow displays and offset cartridges; an ominous bin of discarded limbs at its side. It’s just another example of the LEGO brick’s untapped uncanny potential.

Infusion

Living metal encasing dying flesh

Nobody likes to die horribly at the hand of a horrifying flesh and machine amalgam, such as this Remade inspired by the criminals and other undesirables sentenced to such an existence in British author China Miéville’s Perdido Street Station. This LEGO version by AdNorrel invokes a strange kind of morbid curiosity that just will not let you look away — as long as the incomprehensible thing is not coming at us…

The Remade

There is a lot to love (or fear?) about this creation. The organic parts are very well done, using minifig arms and sausages and even a dark red scarf to create flowing rounded shapes, highlighted by blue rubber bands representing veins. If you look closely at the head, you might recognize a tiny bit of a shrub piece peeking out of a red flower element, making for a good structural part in a build with this many crazy angles. With the mechanical parts, the Remade combines gore and the fear of technology into something nobody wants to see, yet one that we’re unable to stop staring at.