Tag Archives: Corvus Auriac

A box full of nightmare fuel. How jolly.

Spooktacular builder Corvus Auriac is back with another creation determined to haunt your dreams. I’ve never liked the concept of a Jack in the Box – to me, they were always a thin veneer of playfulness over a dark core of “who hurt the toy designer as a child.” As such, it’s kind of refreshing that this one isn’t even trying to pretend to be friendly. There are plenty of complex techniques in use here, but the most chilling has to be the use of minifigure epaulets to form those terrifyingly real teeth.

Evil Jack-in-the-Box

The picture above is a computer-generated render, meaning this doesn’t exist for real. Yet. Corvis has said that a real-world version is on the way soon. We can’t wait. (Oh, wait, yes, we can.) If you’re looking for other builds that cross the line between reality and imagined, check out our render tag.

Aye, there’s a castlehead for you

There’s trainheads and castleheads, but usually it’s meant to refer to fans of the various LEGO themes. However, here’s a build that takes it quite literally. Designed by Corvus Auriac, this 5,400-piece microscale model depicts a castle built on a rock that might be a little more alive than its builders suspected. It’s packed with lovely details from the dragon burninating the town to the tiny wizard tower sprouting out of the side of the castle’s tallest roof. Do yourself a favor and give this one a close look, as you’ll be rewarded with lots of clever parts usages. One of my favorites is also the one used most here: most of the trees are made from dark green minifigure epaulets stacked on each other.

Fantasy Diorama

A darker take on the concept of “Through the looking glass”

When you’re looking for a dark or spooky creation, you know you can count on Corvus Auriac. H.P. Lovecraft Tribute is another prime example of that. It’s a digital render that uses only real-life pieces, a nicely meta “twist on reality.” Seems thematic, anyway.  I love the textures in play, and the way the transparent energy effect pieces around the opening portal have shapes the echo the bat wings and organic curves in the frame. Oh, and also echo the organic curves that appear in the elder god who’s reaching through that mirror.

H.P. Lovecraft Tribute

Check our archives if you’re in the mood for even more horrific builds!

This spirit painting is a Ghostbusting nightmare

Keep your eyes on the prize, the prize painting to be exact. It’s alive! Corvus Auriac keeps true to his recurring morbid theme and shows us an angry, green-haired figure being pulled out of the picture frame. The diorama sets the scene of an archaic manor, home to the artwork, hanging on a peeling burgundy wall, next to a statue nightstand. Still, there’s nothing to fear because a trap is set to capture the spirit by none other than the Ghostbusters.

Complete entry of my Ghostbusters LEGO Ideas contest

The eighty hours Corvus spent crafting this build shows in the details and the myriad of different LEGO pieces. The pattern of sausage elements, frog, leaf, and cheese wedges in the ornate gold frame is hypnotic. The figure’s claws are also reminiscent of a previous Corvus Halloween-themed project. Then the three-dimensional perspective between the spirit and the moon in the background appears to be a nod to impressionism. It’s like one work of art within another. Check out more creepy Corvus builds here.

The heart wants what it wants

If you’re not that into this new LEGO creation by Corvus Auriac then here are some cute doggies for you. However, you know how some people have a tennis ball hanging in their garage that indicates that sweet spot to park your car? Well, in my household that aforementioned tennis ball is a severed doll’s head because, as it turns out, I’m one of those people. So, you can come to the logical conclusion that I’d be way into this. And if you’re even just a bit like me (you know who you are!) you’re probably way into it too. Corvus calls it Heart Artifact. This builder tends to like things on the creepy side, which is just the thing to make my dark heart go pitter-patter. If you’re like me you should still also check out the cute doggies though because even dark and brooding weirdos love puppies.

And up from the ground came a gumblin’ dude. A Ghoul, that is. [Instructions]

Spooky builder extraordinaire Covus Auriac is back with another creepy Halloween scene. The bony arm of a skeleton bursting from the ground may be a farily common trope, but this is one of the best LEGO renditions of it that I’ve seen. I’m particularly fond of the construction on the hand – the combination of white lipstick tubes and a cow horn works disturbingly well. The minifigure hands on the bones give a hint of rotting flesh, and a minifigure skirt is a great way to suggest tattered clothing.

If you’d like to make your own, Corvus is ready to help you get started with step-by-step instructions for the skeleton arm. If you want hints on the gravestone, you’re currently on your own. Maybe you can find some inpiration in the Hidden Side theme?

Carve out some time for this Halloween pumpkin

Let’s avoid the “pumpkin spice” joke this time, and just take a moment to enjoy this elegant build by Corvus Auriac. The fluted exterior of the pumpkin hints at a complex interior structure – getting those curved slopes to nest that closely is both a trick and a treat. I also like the small touch of adding minifigure hands to the spider web to make it feel a bit more organic.

Pumpkin Halloween 2020

Corvus has been kind enough to share instructions for other spooky builds in the past. Hopefully we’ll get a look inside that pumpkin soon, too.

Build your own LEGO creepy crawlies for Halloween scares [Instructions]

Builder Corvus Auriac brings us this creepy looking spider made of LEGO just in time for Halloween. Just imagine how much fun you could have if you could spare enough parts to make a dozen of these to scare the bejesus out of your loved ones opening the medicine cabinet–or perhaps left on the toilet seat cover after midnight with the lights out. What a lovely surprise to bring joy and scariness to celebrate the season.

Click to see full instructions and parts

Getting pump(kin)ed for Halloween

Some people gripe about Christmas decorations going up in stores too early. (Full disclosure: I’m one of them.) On the other hand, I don’t hear many folks complain about a bit of early spooky cheer for Halloween. Corvus Auriac is one of those ready for the festivities to start, based on Creepy Pumpkin. Made up of only 82 pieces, this Jack-o-lantern has nice curves and an expressive face. And check out that great part usage! The stem is made up of a frog and a Ninjago scarf – truly a combination of elements I never expected to write about.
Creepy Pumpkin
If you’d like to make one for yourself, keep an eye on Corvus’ Instagram, as they’ve promised to share a tutorial soon!

20 pieces to crow over

As those with some knowledge of Latin might expect from the user name, Corvus Auriac seems to have a thing for crows. Crows are among the most intelligent of birds and are often known to make use of tools. Corvus the builder is also a tool user, as demonstrated by this lovely digital render of Arminius, The Crow. Creating a recognizable avian can be a challenge, yet Corvus manages it in only 20 pieces. Among the creative part choices are Minifigure wings, a tooth for a beak, and a flipper for the tail. Even the branch is a nice little build, making use of an elephant tail and carrot top.

Arminius, The Crow

Although this is just a flight of fantasy (brick) at present, Corvus says that a real-world version is on the way. I’m looking forward to seeing it!

Mirror, mirror, on the wall....

What’s the scariest mirror of all? This ghastly-looking LEGO mirror built by Corvus Auriac comes close. While the ornate frame is largely black, pockets of gold and silver peek through in a futile attempt to rein in the darkness. I love the ghoulish hand extending from the mirror, singling out its prey with a pointed finger. It’s a frighteningly good build!

The Mirror of the Covenants

Set sail on a tiny sea of nostalgia

The original wave of LEGO Pirates sets from 1989 have a special place in my heart. They are some of the earliest LEGO sets I remember, so this microscale scene by Corvus Auriac fills me with a warm glow. These miniature renditions of the classic sets Eldorado Fortress, Caribbean Clipper, and Black Seas Barracuda are notable not only for the way they evoke memories of my childhood, but also for some great building techniques.

Eldorado Battle

My absolute favorite detail is the use of red flippers as the cannon bases. I learned of the existence of this modified 1×2 plate with three claws / rock fingers piece when inspecting the details of the miniature “ramp and pit” baseplate. The 1×2 curved wedge slopes also work great on the sails of the ships.

Want more retro goodness from Corvus Auriac? Don’t miss the re-imagined Guarded Inn we recently featured.