About Richard Dryden

Richard Dryden was the inspiration for Will Ferrell’s character in The LEGO Movie. Just kidding, the only thing these two guys have in common is their escape to a brick-built sanctuary. Before Richard immersed himself in writing for TBB in 2020, he spent his free time casually collecting themed sets from LEGO Batman to The Simpsons. His first discovery of LEGO began with 1994's Hot Rod Club set. During Rich’s dark period, he was a staple of New York nightlife’s music scene. DJing at parties was routine. And for a few years, he toured internationally or at random wedding gigs. Connecting with new audiences is a consistent theme for Rich (a.k.a. Treats) whether writing about music, playing at events, or researching creative builds throughout the LEGO community. Some samples of his work can be found on djtreats.com.

Posts by Richard Dryden

Batman busts creativity for charity

Batman movies are synonymous with being blockbusters, but rarely ever a “bust.” Now Tim Lydy makes that uncommon instance all the rage through the reveal of The Batman bust. Tim’s creation displays the cold stone-faced expression of Robert Pattinson, who is the latest actor to portray Batman in the forthcoming film. Since the film’s announcement this year, details around Batman’s cowl and suit have been a hot topic of conversation on social media.

The Batman

The long ears are back after their short stint on the caped crusader in Justice League and Batman vs. Superman. Tim also uses two pairs of elements on each side of the chest’s silhouette. The medium barrel automatic pistol and the black pistol revolver both reflect how firearms shape the new logo in The Batman. Around the base, the placement of the black cat, question mark and umbrella reference the film’s villains: Catwoman, Riddler and Penguin, respectively.

Starting today through November 30, Tim’s The Batman bust is for sale to benefit 2020’s Creations for Charity event. Four copies of the bust will be available for purchase, and all of the sales fund LEGO sets for underprivileged kids this Christmas.

Poultry Pinball

2020 being the first year in a long time without a licensed LEGO video game is a disappointing moment for fans. It is yet another faction of business affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, according to GameRant. While there is still hope for the tentative release of LEGO Star Wars: The Skywalker Saga in 2021, this might be a good time for The LEGO Group to develop pinball game sets. Sure, this screams old school. But TLG already notched success when they captured the nostalgia for Super Mario and the Nintendo Entertainment System. Let’s also not forget the brick-built retro games, plus 2016’s Ideas Maze (21305). Just one look at the Chicken-Pen-Ball machine, made by Eli Willsea, has us stuck on tilt.

Chicken-Pen-Ball

Eli’s fifth creation in the Iron Builder competition used the Track Switch 9V in yellow 19 times. He continues to outdo himself going up against Jonas Kramm, another gifted builder. Eli’s use of the Track Switch 9V balances function and form. They serve as the flippers, the flowers (dandelions?) in front of the barn, the handle on the ball shooter, and even the cabinet’s feet. It’s an egg-citing creation that takes our cheap chicken puns to the next level in this demo video. Check it out.

Metamorphosis Falcon

In the movie Solo: A Star Wars Story, the Millennium Falcon lands on a coast, somewhere on the planet Savareen. The view of the ocean behind the Falcon is a brief, peaceful rest stop for the weary yet indomitable ship. While its stay is temporary in the 2018 film, we now have new vision of the Millennium Falcon as a house. Lmcpicture‘s creation makes the most recognizable parts of the Millennium Falcon livable. The starboard side airlock serves as the entrance, which leads either to a bedroom or a back deck. The blue 1×4 tiles are visual references to the beaming blasts on the original ship’s rear drive units.

Millennium falcon house

Read on to see the interior of this tastefully appointed spaceship

The happiest place on your desk

You can just feel your five senses firing at the same time by looking at Jonas Kramm‘s Micro Scale Fairground Series. The self-professed LEGO obsessive from Germany shrinks down the joy of amusement park rides into mechanical MOCSs that bring the fun indoors. His addition of a concession stand offering french fries, a hot dog, and popsicle also complete the experience. Let’s face it, we could all use a trip to an amusement park after the roller coaster year of 2020. So, for now, we’ll settle for the these three (l to r): Acku’s Adventure Ride, Guitar Top Spin, and Sunshine Ferris Wheel.

03 - Micro Scale Fairground Series

Without a doubt, Jonas’ Barb’s Disappearing was my favorite build from 2019. He consistently takes the parts we love from sets like the tree supports from Stranger Things and uses them to elevate his creations. In the case of his Fairground Series, or even Painting a Peacock each creation is an accurate portrayal of their real life counterparts. Each ride hides the mechanics inside the base. It might as well be a feat of magic in the way it all works through the simple turn of a crank. Each ride’s fluid movement is an upgrade from the similar LEGO Ideas Space Rocket Ride (40335). Watch these amusement rides in motion in the video below.

Wake up, time to hide

The tag-team effort of Brickleas and Si-MOCs produced a scene to give science fiction fans a double take. They created a two-tier MOC of an intergalactic manhunt. Topside, a space police officer is in pursuit of an outlaw, meanwhile below, the suspect lurks through the sewer. The collaboration was a standout submission for this September’s Rogue Bricks contest. Teams of two picked either side of a “space gangster” or “space sheriff” to depict their story.

Intergalactic Hide and Seek

In a strange turn of events, Brickleas and Si-MOCs teamed up at the last minute after their original partners dropped out of the contest because their parts were unfinished. The result worked out with Simon Liu (Si-MOCs) building his version of a Spinner from Blade Runner, and a space police minifigure outfitted in Barbara Gordon‘s ceremonial uniform from The LEGO Batman Movie CMF (Series 1) and the LEGO Star Wars Wedge Antilles helmet. Elias Hübner’s (Brickleas) contribution looks as dark and desolate as any subterranean waterway with an underground tunnel as the escape. Check out a photo of the Si-MOCs’ take on the Spinner below.

Intergalactic Space Police

Headphone masterpiece

Audio accessories made from LEGO sounds like music to my ears. It’s the best of both worlds wrapped up “neatly” thanks to Stefan a.k.a. Bricks by Stfn, a prominent member of Swebrick, Sweden’s RLUG. The original wired earphones are byStfn’s latest entry in the monthly Swebrick challenge. The key element is the flex tube (part 27965), also used to represent ropes in the Creator Pirate Ship and as the lead on the Dewback in the newly released LEGO Star Wars Mos Eisley Cantina. The contrast of the silver flex tube with gold-colored accents on the round 1×1 bricks make it look as flashy as a pair of trendy earbuds. Now, if we could just find a way to pump up the volume.

[MOC] Everyday Entanglement

Baking outside of the box

Pastries on Netflix’s Nailed It never look as tasty as this LEGO IKEA BYGGLEK cake made by Milan Sekiz. To be fair, the builder has the advantage of using uniformly shaped plastic to craft the frosted layers, instead of fumbling with a piping bag. IKEA Serbia commissioned Milan to build the unique creation before the BYGGLEK’s October release. The two candles are very apropos marking the celebration of LEGO and IKEA’s collaboration.

LEGO IKEA BYGGLEK Cake

Using the BYGGLEK for the actual purpose of storage is still a big part of this creation. The boxes also contain a plate, silverware, and a sample slice of the cake all built from LEGO elements. With stacks of detail, Milan completes the confection with a reference to “the cake is a lie” meme in his Instagram post, made famous by Portal. This sweet taste of ignorance is bliss!

When nature calls, build bricks

Plants are nature’s greatest display. The cathartic feeling of seeing a tiny jungle is alive in Dave Kaleta’s LEGO plant box. Using the new IKEA BYGGLEK, Dave fills the inside of the base with some loose brown bricks, representing the soil. The small garden is made of green studs, slope-shaped bricks, and leaf elements. The real life plants, accompanied in the photo, contrast the plastic counterpart.

LEGO x IKEA Countertop Planter

Dave’s 26x18x12cm BYGGLEK is a picturesque centerpiece mirroring the realism of indoor plants. The installation of a grow light gives some hope that these babies will sprout into trees. We’re just kidding. Notice the three button elements on the front of the BYGGLEK planter. They symbolize various power functions (left to right): bright light, water, and night mode (possibly a dimmer). This smart build puts the theme of sustainability at the forefront as we’ve seen in recent years from The LEGO Group, as they’ve rolled out plant-based elements (40320) in an effort to lower their carbon footprint. We’re digging this!

Water, water, everywhere

This summer, I’ve had watercraft on the brain. Moana’s Starlight Canoe is the latest LEGO build by Letranger Absurde that follows my stream of reality shows I am currently addicted to watching. Below Deck Mediterranean and Below Deck Sailing Yacht are in heavy rotation. This fantastical route inspired by Moana, the 2016 Disney film, is a nice change of pace. Letranger Absurde does another solid job at modeling her figures with realism, adding stylish details of the character’s dress. This is the sixth installment in her Once Upon A Time series that recreates iconic scenes and characters from the annals of Disney (i.e. The Little Mermaid and Snow White). Building a real-life canoe is a feat unto itself. So the recreation of the bamboo deck along with other wooden-like textures gives off the appearance of a watercraft ready to take on the elements. The kicker in the canoe’s rigging is the string of beige battle droid arms supporting the mast. I’m already over my head in nautical terms. Ahoy!

Once Upon a Time VI - Aquamarine

Check out more cool creations by Letranger Absurde (vitreolum).

The stars align for a classic space nova

Bionicle Day, 8/10 (810nicle), is behind us, and we’re catching up by celebrating some builds that incorporate the popular buildable figure elements from LEGO’s past. Blake Foster found inspiration to use Bionicle elements such as Macku‘s helmet and Hero Factory feet (ball and socket configuration) for the side of the hull. The standard blue LEGO Classic Space hue is an obvious homage to the 1986 LEGO Cosmic Fleet Voyager. Just don’t expect to see Benny fit into this space fighter, because it is micro-scale. After some quick research on novae, I get why Blake Foster named it “Nova Class.” It is akin to nova, the astronomical event where new stars form and explode, shining bright and slowly fading, just as Blake described how the build constantly came apart during its construction. For now, bask in its glow.

Nova Class Heavy Fighter

The BATSUB explores the depth of Batman’s vehicles

Batman’s watercraft mostly played second fiddle to his main vehicles in The LEGO Batman Movie. It would have been great to see a submarine from his fleet explore the deep seas of Gotham City. Stevenpavan created the BATSUB, modeled after the Yellow Submarine, with some major upgrades, and of course in black. The BATSUB’s specs are imagined with the type of realism you’d expect from some tinkering by Lucius Fox. According to the builder, it’s armed with electromagnetic harpoons (on its sides) and EMP blasts (not visible). We’re just happy to see that it has dual propellers and a removable roof to place a few minifigures in the cabin.

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Street Fighter minifigures battle toe-to-toe

Street Fighter II in an arcade cabinet is the ultimate trap. Once you get your hands on it, you’re hooked. Now, Capcom’s iconic fighter video game from 1991, known for attracting crowds from pizzerias to amusement parks, now exists in miniature LEGO form thanks to _pixeljunkie_. The cabinet looks close to the height of the 8-bit mini arcades by Basic Fun, but _pixeljunkie_ recreated Street Fighter II‘s key gameplay through minifigures of Ryu and Ken.

Street Fighter II

Click here to see the fighters in action